Posts Tagged ‘vomiting’

Cough, Gasp, Blurp – Causes of Vomiting in Dogs and Cats

White and tan English Bulldog on black rug

Did your best friend get sick on the carpet again? Let’s talk about it! [Photo by Pixabay via Pexels]

By Morris Animal Foundation

Who hasn’t woken up in the middle of the night to the sounds of a pet leaving a gift on the carpet/bed/laundry? If you own a dog or cat (or both), chances are you’ve had to clean up something your pet has brought up.

Although many pets experience an occasional episode of vomiting, it also can be a sign of many serious diseases. In addition, regurgitation can be mistaken for vomiting. The two are not synonymous and point toward different underlying problems. It’s important for owners to know the difference, and to know the various causes of vomiting and regurgitation to determine when a trip to the veterinarian is needed and when it isn’t.

The difference between these two activities all boils down to the problem’s anatomic location; esophagus for regurgitation and abdomen for vomiting.

The esophagus is a long tube stretching from the neck through the chest, emptying into the stomach. No digestion takes place in the esophagus, but it’s considered part of the digestive tract. The oral cavity also is part of the digestive system, but most diseases in this area don’t cause either regurgitation or vomiting.

The main business parts of the digestive tract are contained in the abdomen and include the stomach, liver, gall bladder, pancreas, small intestine, large intestine, cecum and anus. Problems in any of these areas can result in vomiting.

Knowing the anatomy helps understand the signs typically seen when problems occur in a specific area of the digestive tract.

Signs of regurgitation include:
*Passive expulsion of material – usually a pet lowers their head and material comes out
*No signs of nausea such as lip smacking or salivation
*Undigested food or other ingested material is common
*Occasionally frothy, foamy material is noted

Signs of vomiting include:
*Retching
*Nausea and salivation
*Contents can range from undigested to partially digested food, to liquid
*Expulsion is active and contents are often propelled with force
*Presence of bile

While taking a video of your pet can be helpful in guiding your veterinarian toward the best diagnostic tests, owners usually can’t respond quickly enough to catch the pet in the moment (while they are trying to get their pet off the carpet) or the owner isn’t present.

Unfortunately, most pet owners just find a pile of something on the floor and don’t witness the event itself. However gross, it’s important to note the characteristics of the material. This includes:

*The color of the material, paying special attention to the presence of red blood, dried blood (which looks like coffee grounds), bile (which is yellow), or brown, foul smelling material
*The presence or absence of food and if it’s digested or undigested
*The presence or absence of foreign material
*The presence or absence of lots of saliva or foam

Before we move on, we need to make a quick detour and talk about esophageal foreign bodies. As many of us know, dogs often don’t chew things 100 times as our grandmothers suggested – they often swallow food, toys and other objects after just a few bites. Occasionally, items are simply too large to pass through the esophagus into the stomach. Dogs with esophageal foreign bodies will salivate a lot, gag, paw at their mouth and retch – they can look a lot like a nauseous dog but their problem is esophageal.

This brings us to one of the most common questions heard by veterinarians and their staff – when is vomiting an emergency and when can a pet owner wait and watch?

As mentioned above, esophageal foreign bodies are an emergency. The vast majority of owners either witness their dog (cats rarely eat something too big!) eat something and then start gagging, or their dog is so clearly distressed they immediately seek veterinary care.

Other times, owners should seek veterinary care, is if there is blood in the vomitus; if a pet is vomiting and seems depressed, lethargic or has stopped eating; if vomiting/gagging/regurgitating is prolonged and severe; or if vomiting is intermittent but lasts longer than one week. A pet that vomits once or twice and seems bright and alert is one the owner can monitor closely.


Registered client? Contact Us with questions about your pet.


Morris Animal Foundation has funded a large list of studies looking for answers to the diverse diseases associated with vomiting in dogs and cats, including viral infections such as parvovirus in both dogs and cats, kidney disease and cancer. But there are still many unanswered questions. We need your help to find better ways to help our dogs and cats have better, healthier lives. Learn more about the scope of the studies we fund as well as our history and commitment to advancing animal health.

Original article can be found here.

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Over the past couple of weeks, we’ve been talking about what you should do in the event of a pet poisoning emergency. (Click the links to refresh your memory.)

Today, we’ll hit upon a topic that likely has many people confused: if a pet ingests a toxic substance, should the pet be made to vomit in order to rid its body of the toxin?

Here is what the experts at Pet Poison Helpline and Veterinary Pet Insurance want you to know:

  • If your pet is already showing signs of poisoning, it’s too late to induce vomiting.
  • If your pet has certain medical problems (like laryngeal paralysis or brachycephalic syndrome), inducing vomiting is not recommended and can make your pet’s condition worse.
  • Certain toxins (such as corrosive cleaners and hydrocarbons such as gasoline, paint thinners and kerosene) should NOT be brought back up. Inducing vomiting after the ingestion of these products may ultimately cause more harm than good.

The smartest thing you can do in the event of a suspected poisoning is to call the Pet Poison Helpline (855-764-7661) for advice and then take your pet to the nearest pet emergency hospital.

Est. 1973Coming Thursday:  If your pet throws up this chemical, it can be deadly to people.

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If your pet ingests a toxic substance, your first move should be to call the Pet Poison Helpline.

Veterinary experts at the Pet Poison Helpline (PPH) will tell you what to do in the event of a poisoning incident.

But it’s important to be prepared with the tools you’ll need in order to follow instructions given by PPH. In some cases, you will be instructed to take your pet straight to the nearest emergency hospital, without inducing vomiting or feeding anything else to your pet. But in certain cases, you will be instructed to prepare your pet for emergency care.

In that event, you should have the following items on hand, in case they are needed:

  • Hydrogen peroxide 3% (non-expired)
  • Liquid dishwashing detergent (such as Palmolive or Dawn)
  • Rubber gloves
  • Triple antibiotic ointment (such as Dermalone or Neosporin)
  • Vitamin E oil or capsules
  • Diphenhydramine liquid or 25 mg tablets (such as Benadryl), with no other combination ingredients
  • Can of tuna packed in water; chicken broth; or some type of tasty canned pet food
  • Corn syrup

Here’s another tip to keep you from scrambling in an emergency: Program your phone with the numbers of the nearest pet emergency hospital (such as Blue Pearl 757-499-5463) and Pet Poison Helpline (1-855-289-0358).

Est. 1973

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Tips taken from “Preventing Pet Poisoning Emergencies” by Pet Poison Helpline and Veterinary Pet Insurance

Check our blog for more tips on handling pet poisoning emergencies in the coming weeks!

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