Posts Tagged ‘vomiting’

Over the past couple of weeks, we’ve been talking about what you should do in the event of a pet poisoning emergency. (Click the links to refresh your memory.)

Today, we’ll hit upon a topic that likely has many people confused: if a pet ingests a toxic substance, should the pet be made to vomit in order to rid its body of the toxin?

Here is what the experts at Pet Poison Helpline and Veterinary Pet Insurance want you to know:

  • If your pet is already showing signs of poisoning, it’s too late to induce vomiting.
  • If your pet has certain medical problems (like laryngeal paralysis or brachycephalic syndrome), inducing vomiting is not recommended and can make your pet’s condition worse.
  • Certain toxins (such as corrosive cleaners and hydrocarbons such as gasoline, paint thinners and kerosene) should NOT be brought back up. Inducing vomiting after the ingestion of these products may ultimately cause more harm than good.

The smartest thing you can do in the event of a suspected poisoning is to call the Pet Poison Helpline (855-764-7661) for advice and then take your pet to the nearest pet emergency hospital.

Est. 1973Coming Thursday:  If your pet throws up this chemical, it can be deadly to people.

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If your pet ingests a toxic substance, your first move should be to call the Pet Poison Helpline.

Veterinary experts at the Pet Poison Helpline (PPH) will tell you what to do in the event of a poisoning incident.

But it’s important to be prepared with the tools you’ll need in order to follow instructions given by PPH. In some cases, you will be instructed to take your pet straight to the nearest emergency hospital, without inducing vomiting or feeding anything else to your pet. But in certain cases, you will be instructed to prepare your pet for emergency care.

In that event, you should have the following items on hand, in case they are needed:

  • Hydrogen peroxide 3% (non-expired)
  • Liquid dishwashing detergent (such as Palmolive or Dawn)
  • Rubber gloves
  • Triple antibiotic ointment (such as Dermalone or Neosporin)
  • Vitamin E oil or capsules
  • Diphenhydramine liquid or 25 mg tablets (such as Benadryl), with no other combination ingredients
  • Can of tuna packed in water; chicken broth; or some type of tasty canned pet food
  • Corn syrup

Here’s another tip to keep you from scrambling in an emergency: Program your phone with the numbers of the nearest pet emergency hospital (such as Blue Pearl 757-499-5463) and Pet Poison Helpline (1-855-289-0358).

Est. 1973

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Tips taken from “Preventing Pet Poisoning Emergencies” by Pet Poison Helpline and Veterinary Pet Insurance

Check our blog for more tips on handling pet poisoning emergencies in the coming weeks!

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