Posts Tagged ‘vaccinations’

Attention, Clients of Little Creek Veterinary Clinic:

Mid-month reminder emails have been sent, for pets that are due or past-due for a check-up and boosters.

If you are not seeing our emails in your Inbox, please check your Spam or Junk folder, as they may get routed there when we send notices to many clients at one time.

If you are not sure of your pet’s vaccine status, please Contact Us online or by phone (757-583-2619.)

A lot of changes can happen to your pet over the course of the year. Let’s work together to keep your pet happy and healthy!

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We've missed your pet - it's checkup time!
At Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, we know you’re busy and have so much on your plate – but if we haven’t seen your best friend in over a year, we want you to know it’s checkup time! 

Did You Know? Pets age faster than people, so a lot can change in your pet’s body in just one year. Set up an appointment today so we can be sure everything is A-OK.

Yearly checkups are as essential as food and love – they’re the best way to keep your pet as healthy as possible, because it’s much easier to prevent disease than to treat it.

Contact Us today to schedule your pet’s appointment. We’re looking forward to helping your pet stay happy and healthy!

 

Little Creek Veterinary Clinic 
2456 E. Little Creek Road
Norfolk, VA 23518
757-583-2619

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At Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, we’re praying that Hurricane Irma stays away, but we advise pet owners to have a plan in place if this storm — or any other — should head our way.

Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends that pet owners take the following precautions, whether they evacuate, ride out the storm at home, or head for a pet-friendly emergency shelter:

  • Gather your pet’s vaccine records, especially the Rabies certificate; you may need to show this information at shelters or hotels. (If your pet is not current on its vaccines, Contact Us to schedule an appointment today.)
  • Ensure you have at least a two-week supply (or more) of your pet’s most-needed medications. Drug refills can be difficult to come by if veterinary clinics are unable to re-open right away.
  • Pack a first aid kit. Suggested contents can be found in the booklet “Saving The Whole Family,” available at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic for $2.00.
  • Ensure you have adequate food and water for your pet — typically a minimum of two weeks’ worth, if evacuating. If there is time, order extra Prescription Diet food.
  • Be sure your pet can be identified with a microchip ID, ID tag, or tattoo, if it should become separated from you.
  • Gather leashes, collars or harnesses, and pet carriers, to safely transport your pet.
  • Pack a favorite blanket or toy, treats, and food/water dish to give your pet a sense of comfort and familiarity.
  • Continue to treat your pets for fleas and heartworms, as pests can become more problematic after a storm.
  • For dogs: pack a supply of waste bags. For cats: pack a small litter box with litter or paper towels.

For more information, pick up a copy of
“Saving The Whole Family,”
available now, at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

 

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There is a new strain of Canine Influenza making the rounds in the U.S., and with a nation of travelers, it’s a good idea to protect your dog before the flu arrives in town, according to Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian.

H3N2 Flu vaccine now available at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic!

Both strains of Canine Flu (H3N8 and H3N2) are commonly contracted where dogs are grouped together for significant periods of time or have nose-to-nose contact, such as at boarding kennels, grooming parlors, doggie daycare, and dog parks. 

The original H3N8 Canine Flu vaccine has been available for a few years. Now that a vaccine for H3N2 is available, many boarding and grooming facilities are requiring it for their canine customers. In response, Little Creek Veterinary Clinic has begun making the new flu vaccine available for patients.

The H3N2 vaccine is given first as a two-dose series,  three weeks apart. After that, a single yearly booster is all that’s needed to keep your dog protected against H3N2. [Severely lapsed vaccines may require the 2-dose regimen to be repeated.]

Contact Us to schedule an appointment to get your pet protected against the H3N2 Canine Flu today!

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Dr. Miele will be out of the office on both 
Wednesday, Dec. 9 and Wednesday, Dec. 16.

The office will be open from 9:30 AM to noon both days, 
for retail sales and appointment scheduling.

As always, we regret that we are unable to fill 
prescription drugs in the doctor’s absence.

If your pet needs immediate medical attention,
please call BluePearl at 757-499-5463.

 

Est. 1973

 

(Click here for pet care!)

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Canine Flu vaccine

If you think only people can catch the flu – think again. A flu strain known as H3N8 affects dogs all over America.

Get the facts here, then make an appointment with us to vaccinate your dog for Canine Influenza.

Some quick facts about Canine Flu:

  • Only affects dogs
  • First reported in March 2003, in Florida
  • Highly contagious, especially in kennels, shelters, grooming parlors, dog parks
  • Signs include persistent cough, fever, nasal discharge, lack of energy, lack of appetite
  • Nearly 20% of infected dogs will develop high fever and pneumonia
  • Spread through direct contact; cough or sneeze; contaminated hands, clothing, surfaces

My dog’s records say she’s received the Parainfluenza vaccine already.  That’s the same thing as the H3N8 Flu, right?
No.  Parainfluenza is a different virus, unrelated to the (relatively) newly discovered H3N8.  Your pet’s immune system will know the difference!

My dog is already vaccinated against Bordetella (Kennel Cough.)  Isn’t that the same thing?
No.  Although the symptoms may look the same, the organisms responsible are different.  Bordetella is caused by bacteria; Canine Influenza is caused by a virus.  Vaccinating against one does not provide protection against the other.

How can I tell whether my dog needs the Canine Flu vaccination?
The same situations that call for the Bordetella vaccine, also call for the Flu shot. Check this list* to see which situations apply to your pet:

  • Pet comes from a shelter, rescue group, breeding kennel, pet store
  • Pet boards at a kennel or goes to doggie daycare
  • Pet attends group training classes
  • Pet goes to a groomer, dog parks, or meets other dogs during its daily walks
  • Pet is entered into dog shows
  • Pet comes into contact with other dogs in veterinary clinic or pet store

How many Canine Flu shots does my dog need?
Initially, dogs should receive two Flu shots spaced 2-4 weeks apart; after that, one booster yearly is recommended.

So if my pet gets the Canine Flu shot, it won’t develop the disease?
The Canine Flu vaccine makes it much less likely that your pet will develop the disease.  And if he does get sick, he is more likely to have a mild case and recover more quickly than a dog that has not been vaccinated.

Why did the veterinarian give my dog antibiotics, if the Canine Flu is a virus?
The doctor may opt to treat suspected secondary bacterial infections with antibiotics.  Bacterial infections are often responsible for a thick yellow/green nasal discharge that can accompany the Flu, but there can be other symptoms, as well.   

Remember:  when your pet is sick, its immune system is fighting the primary illness, but it is still vulnerable to other diseases that come along.  In our clinic, we call those secondary infections “opportunistic” because they are taking advantage of the opportunity infect a pet with a weakened immune system.  And, unfortunately, Mother Nature has no law against people or pets suffering more than one illness at a time.

Learn more about reducing your dog’s risk of contracting Canine Influenza.

*Borrowed from “Canine Influenza: What do I need to know?” by Intervet Schering-Plough Animal Health. Pamphlet is available at our office.

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This article was posted on November 10, 2011 and November 14, 2012, and November 26, 2013.

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We’re in for nasty weather this weekend — bad enough that many Neptune Festival events have been cancelled

So this is an apt time for us to remind you about storm and disaster planning. As a pet owner, you have an extra set of responsibilities, which require extra thought and preparation.

Here’s a guide to get you started:

1. If evacuating, determine whether you can safely and reasonably bring pets with you.
If yes – be certain the intended storm shelter, hotel, or other destination will accept pets.
If no – find out which local animal shelters and boarding kennels will accept pets during the storm.

2. Gather all paperwork showing that your pet is up-to-date on its vaccinations, whether your pet stays home or heads for higher ground.
If the vaccines are expired, now is a good time to renew them.

3. Stock up on your pet’s medications. In the case of evacuation, you may need two weeks’ to one month’s worth of medications on hand.

4. Transfer your pet’s food to a sturdy, water-proof container, to prevent spoilage.

5. When buying gallon water jugs for the family, figure in each pet as one more family member and purchase water accordingly.

6. Gather collars or harnesses, tags, leashes or pet carriers for easy access during evacuation.

7. Animals with storm anxiety may need extra care; those that tend to run or hide may be more safely kept in a roomy pet crate during the storm.

8. A permanent microchip ID, such as HomeAgain, is the best bet for reuniting pets and families that may become separated during the storm.

9. Pick up your copy of “Saving the Whole Family”available at our office for $2. The booklet has tips for owners of dogs, cats, reptiles, horses, and other pets. You’ll also find complete guides to building first-aid kits and evacuation kits. Get yours today!

Saving the Whole Family

Pick up a booklet today, for just $2. Available at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

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This post appeared on August 22, 2012.

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