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Posts Tagged ‘Tylenol in pets’

Protect your pet

It’s safe to say that most, if not all, households have a supply of medications on hand, for the human residents of the house. Many of these homes also feature pets — and to a curious dog or cat, your medication could look like a delicious treat.

Dr. Justine Lee, a veterinarian who is board-certified in toxicology [a science dealing with poisons], has 3 recommendations that everyone can follow to reduce the chance that their pet will become a victim of accidental medication poisoning.

  1. If you use pill boxes, put them out of your pet’s reach. Cats and some dogs can climb onto the counter and grab hold of whatever they find there, so remove the temptation.
  2. Hang up backpacks, purses, and briefcases because they often contain basic (but dangerous) items like pills, Tylenol, xylitol gum and candy, coins, and cellphones with batteries.
  3. Ask house guests to keep medications in sturdy containers, out of the pet’s reach. “It’s really easy for dogs to chew into [plastic bags and suitcases],” warns Dr. Lee.

And if you suspect your pet has gotten into your medication? Take action right away by calling the Pet Poison Helpline — there is a fee for service, but the information they provide can help save your pet’s life.

Pet Poison Helpline 
Call 1-855-764-7661
Open 24/7
$59 incident fee applies 

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If you have ever considered giving Tylenol or its generic equivalent (acetaminophen) to a sick or injured pet, take our advice:  Don’t do it.

Dogs and cats are not little people in fur coats.  Their physiology is significantly different from ours, such that our medicine cabinet staples can be poisonous to them.

Tylenol (also known as acetaminophen) is deadly to dogs and catsEven one tablet is too much for a cat.  Acetaminophen causes severe liver damage, as well as damage to oxygen-carrying red blood cells.

Signs of Tylenol poisoning include:

  • vomiting
  • breathing difficulty
  • lethargy
  • weakness
  • drooling
  • brown-colored gums

The second stage of poisoning includes:

  • swelling of the face, lips and legs
  • loss of coordination
  • convulsions 
  • coma  

If a pet survives stage 2, it will go into stage 3 and exhibit jaundice due to liver failure; belly pain and an altered mental state.

Tylenol poisoning must always be treated as an emergency. 
Take your pet directly to the 24-hour emergency hospital (Blue Pearl Veterinary Emergency Hospital at 364 South Independence Blvd. in Virginia Beach.)  Pets that recover may need to be on medications and specialized diets to compensate for reduced liver function, for life.

In short, there is no acceptable case in which to give Tylenol or acetaminophen to your pet!

Resources: 

http://petplace.com/dogs/acetaminophen-toxicity-in-dogs/page1.aspx

http://petplace.com/cats/acetaminophen-toxicity-in-cats/page1.aspx

Helpful Phone Numbers

Blue Pearl Veterinary Emergency Hospital…….…………757-499-5463

Pet Poison Helpline ($49 fee)…………………1-855-764-7661

 

ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center ($65 fee)…………1-888-426-4435

P1060065

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This post originally appeared on January 4, 2011.

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     Veterinary Pet Insurance (VPI) and Pet Poison Helpline have teamed up to create a helpful refrigerator decal warning about drug dangers for pets.

     These are the Top Six categories of human medications that are toxic to pets; examples of the drugs are in parentheses, but are by no means a complete list:

  1. Pain relievers (Advil, Aleve, Motrin, Tylenol)
  2. Antidepressants (Zoloft, Cymbalta, Effexor)
  3. ADD/ADHD medications (Ritalin, Vyvanse)
  4. Sleep aids (Klonopin, Ambien, Lunesta)
  5. Muscle relaxants (Lioresal, Flexeril)
  6. Heart medications (Cartia, Cardizem)
    Decal available at our clinic. Get yours FREE while they last!

    Coming soon:  New Pet Owner packs sponsored
    by Veterinary Pet Insurance

 

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     Yesterday, we shared with you a list of cat toxins found in the home.  Today, we present the Top Ten list of toxins for dogs, as compiled by Veterinary Pet Insurance and Pet Poison Helpline.

  1. Chocolate
  2. Insect bait stations
  3. Mouse and rat poison
  4. Fertilizers
  5. Xylitol (sugar substitute) in items such as candy and gum
  6. Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, generics)
  7. Acetaminophen (Tylenol, generics)
  8. Silica gel packs
  9. Amphetamines such as ADD/ADHD drugs
  10. Household cleaners

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     VPI Pet Insurance has compiled a list of the Top Ten toxic items for cats, as reported by Pet Poison HelpLine.  (Look for the Top Ten list for dogs, tomorrow.)

  1. Lilies
  2. Canine permethrin insecticides (flea & tick treatments)
  3. Household cleaners
  4. Mouse and rat poison
  5. Paint and varnish
  6. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
  7. Glow sticks, glow jewelry
  8. Amphetamines, such as ADD/ADHD drugs
  9. Acetaminophen (Tylenol, generics)
  10. Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, generics)

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