Posts Tagged ‘toxicity’

If your pet ingests a toxic substance, your first move should be to call the Pet Poison Helpline.

Veterinary experts at the Pet Poison Helpline (PPH) will tell you what to do in the event of a poisoning incident.

But it’s important to be prepared with the tools you’ll need in order to follow instructions given by PPH. In some cases, you will be instructed to take your pet straight to the nearest emergency hospital, without inducing vomiting or feeding anything else to your pet. But in certain cases, you will be instructed to prepare your pet for emergency care.

In that event, you should have the following items on hand, in case they are needed:

  • Hydrogen peroxide 3% (non-expired)
  • Liquid dishwashing detergent (such as Palmolive or Dawn)
  • Rubber gloves
  • Triple antibiotic ointment (such as Dermalone or Neosporin)
  • Vitamin E oil or capsules
  • Diphenhydramine liquid or 25 mg tablets (such as Benadryl), with no other combination ingredients
  • Can of tuna packed in water; chicken broth; or some type of tasty canned pet food
  • Corn syrup

Here’s another tip to keep you from scrambling in an emergency: Program your phone with the numbers of the nearest pet emergency hospital (such as Blue Pearl 757-499-5463) and Pet Poison Helpline (1-855-289-0358).

Est. 1973

********************************************************************
Tips taken from “Preventing Pet Poisoning Emergencies” by Pet Poison Helpline and Veterinary Pet Insurance

Check our blog for more tips on handling pet poisoning emergencies in the coming weeks!

Read Full Post »

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
Veterinary Pet Insurance and Pet Poison Helpline have teamed up to bring you resources and information to help you in a pet poisoning emergency.

Know what to do! If you suspect your pet has ingested a harmful substance, contact a local pet emergency hospital, such as Blue Pearl at 757-499-5463, or call Pet Poison Helpline at 1-855-289-0358 any time, day or night. The Pet Poison Helpline will bill your credit card a one-time, per-incident fee of $39.

Gather the right information! Have this information ready when calling:

  • What your pet ingested and when
  • How much of the substance your pet ingested (how many pills, what milligram strength; how many ounces of chocolate, etc)
  • Pet’s current weight
  • Pet’s medical history, any medications or supplements

Get the app! Purchase a Pet Poison Helpline app at the iTunes App Store for only $1.99, for your iPhone, and get access to information that can help save your pet’s life.

Emergency assistance at your fingertips!

Emergency assistance at your fingertips!

Get the app from the iTunes store.

Get the app from the iTunes store.

 

Coming Thursday: Pack a First Aid Kit for pet poisoning emergencies. We’ll tell you how.

On Facebook: Watch for the Pet Poison Helpline Top Ten lists this week and next.

Read Full Post »

    

     If you’ve ever considered giving Tylenol or its generic equivalent to a sick or injured pet, take our advice:  Don’t do it.

     Dogs and cats are not little people in fur coats.  Their physiology is significantly different from ours, such that our medicine cabinet staples can be poisonous to them.

     Tylenol (also known as acetaminophen) is deadly to dogs and cats.  Even one tablet is too much for a cat.  Acetaminophen causes severe liver damage, as well as damage to oxygen-carrying red blood cells.

     Signs of Tylenol poisoning include vomiting, breathing difficulty, lethargy, weakness, drooling, and brown-colored gums.  The second stage of poisoning includes swelling of the face, lips and legs; loss of coordination; convulsions and coma.  If a pet survives stage 2, it will go into stage 3 and exhibit jaundice due to liver failure; belly pain and an altered mental state.

     Tylenol poisoning must always be treated as an emergency:  take your pet directly to the 24-hour emergency hospital, such as the Tidewater Animal Emergency and Referral Center (364 South Independence Blvd. in Virginia Beach.)  Pets which recover may need to be on medications and specialized diets to compensate for reduced liver function, for life.

     In short, there is no acceptable case in which to give Tylenol or acetaminophen!

Resource:  http://petplace.com/dogs/acetaminophen-toxicity-in-dogs/page1.aspx

                   http://petplace.com/cats/acetaminophen-toxicity-in-cats/page1.aspx

Helpful Phone Numbers

Tidewater Animal Emergency & Referral Center…………757-499-5463

Pet Poison Helpline ($35 per incident fee)…………………1-800-213-6680  www.petpoisonhelpline.com

ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center ($65 fee)…………1-888-426-4435  www.aspca.org/apcc

Read Full Post »