Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘ticks’

Baked bean? Nope – it’s an engorged, dead tick, thoughtfully preserved for the enlightenment of future generations of pet owners. Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Can we all agree that ticks are disgusting? Yes? Good!

Now, let’s talk about how to remove ticks from your pet. There are right ways and wrong ways to remove ticks. You’re going to want to do it the right way.

Do This to Remove Ticks:

  • Check for and remove ticks as soon as possible, to help prevent the transmission of disease.
  • Wear gloves, to avoid transmission of disease from the tick.
  • Use tweezers or a tick removal device to do the job.
  • Grasp the tick firmly, as close to the pet’s skin as possible, and pull back slowly and steadily.
  • Clean the area with soap and water after the tick has been removed.
  • Place the tick (or ticks) in a small container and bring it to your pet’s doctor for examination. Different ticks carry different diseases, so tick identification is an important part of treatment.

…But Don’t Do That:

  • Don’t try burning or heating up the tick. You are more likely to injure your pet this way.
  • Don’t try to “smother” the tick with petroleum jelly or fingernail polish. It’s a time-waster, and time is critical in preventing the transmission of tick-borne diseases.
  • Don’t crush or yank the tick, and don’t twist it. Doing so could increase your pet’s risk of exposure to disease.
  • Don’t fret about not removing the mouthparts. Some ticks have very long mouthparts that are cemented in place for the feeding. It’s not worth the hassle of going in after them, according to Dr. Glen Needham, an expert on ticks who recently spoke on the subject with Norfolk veterinarians.

In the Future:

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Protect your dog from fleas and ticks this summer
with NexGard chewables.

NexGard protects your dog from fleas and ticks with an easy, tasty monthly chewable treat. Little Creek Veterinary Clinic is the place to purchase NexGard for dogs weighing 4 – 60 lbs*. 

NexGard is available by prescription only. Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends NexGard chewables, especially for dogs that have dry, irritated, or inflamed skin, which are not ideal surfaces for topical flea treatments.

Contact Us to learn more about protecting your dog with NexGard.

*Our online pharmacy will ship orders for dogs over 60 pounds.

Read Full Post »

You asked for it — we’ve got it!

P1140794

Little Creek Veterinary Clinic now carries NexGard Chewables – the monthly oral flea and tick protection by the makers of HeartGard.

NexGard Chewables kill fleas before they can lay eggs, and it keeps working all month long.
Because NexGard is an oral flea treatment, your pet can be bathed or go swimming as many times as you like, without sacrificing flea control efficacy.

NexGard is proven to kill Black-legged ticks, American Dog ticks, Lone Star ticks, and Brown dog ticks – all month long.

NexGard is safe to use in dogs and puppies 8 weeks and older, weighing 4 or more pounds.

Little Creek Veterinary Clinic now has for sale NexGard Chewables for dogs weighing 4 pounds – 60 pounds.

NexGard Chewables are a prescription medication — so we will need to see your pet before we can dispense it.

Contact Us today at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic and ask about Nexgard Chewables flea and tick treatment for dogs.

Read Full Post »

April is Prevention of Lyme Disease in Dogs Month

What is Lyme Disease? Lyme Disease is an illness caused by Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria, which are carried in the midgut of deer ticks and transmitted to dogs through a tick bite. Symptoms of Lyme Disease include lameness that shifts from leg to leg, swollen joints, lack of appetite, depression, fever, difficulty breathing. As the disease progresses, it can cause serious injury to the dog’s kidneys.

How do dogs get Lyme Disease? When a deer tick carrying B. burgdorferi feeds on a dog for at least 48 hours, the bacteria are “awakened” and travel out of the tick’s midgut, into the dog’s bloodstream, through the site of the tick bite. 

Baked bean? Nope – it’s an engorged, dead tick, thoughtfully preserved for the enlightenment of future generations of pet owners. Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

This is not a deer tick, but it is a well-fed tick.

Here’s where it gets a little technical: While the bacteria, B. burgdorferi, resides in the tick’s gut, they are protected by a special coating called Outer Surface Protein A (OspA).  A dog that is vaccinated for Lyme Disease has — circulating in its blood — antibodies to OspA. When the tick ingests the blood, the OspA antibodies travel to the tick’s midgut and attack the B. burgdorferi there — before they’ve had a chance to awaken and mobilize.

So, rather than the vaccine-induced antibodies attacking an organism that has already entered the dog’s body, they instead attack the organisms outside the dog’s body, while still in the host. That is why we — cheekily — refer to it as “vaccinating the tick.”

Think of Lyme Disease vaccine as the vaccine that stops an organism before it reaches your pet: like an invisible force field! Pretty cool, huh?

But remember: deer ticks and other ticks can transmit nasty diseases in addition to Lyme Disease. There is no vaccine (yet) for Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Ehrlichiosis, Anaplasmosis (and the list goes on.) For that reason, we recommend year-round tick control, like the Seresto collar. Stop those little pests cold!

Ready to vaccinate your dog against Lyme Disease? Contact Us to schedule an appointment.

Read Full Post »

The Seresto 8-month Flea and Tick collars continue to impress our clients with its ease of use and effectiveness against ectoparasites. In response, we are keeping a steady supply of the collars on hand.

Good news! We have also begun carrying the Seresto collars for cats. 

Seresto cat

The Seresto $15 rebate is coming to an end in two weeks,
on September 30th.
Be sure to stop in and grab a collar for your pet today!

Seresto rebate

Read Full Post »

Q: Is your pet at risk for any of the following:

A) Fleas
B) Ticks
C) Worms
D) All of the above

A: All of the above (and they ALL can be tough to spot!)

Schedule your pet’s annual checkup today to be sure
your pet is healthy!

Is your dog very tired? Is your cat eating less than usual? These seemingly minor changes may mean your pet has a flea allergy, an internal parasite infection, or a tick-related disease.

Let’s talk about fleas first. The majority of pets don’t have fleas—but many have been bitten because fleas are everywhere! Yes, fleas live outdoors but they can live indoors too – even in really clean homes – year-round in any climate. Fleas will gladly hitch a ride on your pet into your house. And all it takes is one flea bite (specifically the flea’s saliva), to set off a full-blown skin allergy. Pets may scratch their sides and neck, or even lick their paws until they’re red and painful. What pet wants to move around or eat when feeling this miserable?

Internal parasites (such as worms) can infect your pet in a number of ways. Sometimes, it’s hard to know if your pet has them. But left untreated, worms can be dangerous to your pet’s internal organs. They can even cause your pet to lose blood.

Ticks are tricky. Even when you check your pet for ticks they can be tough to find because they’re small and hide well in dark fur. But it’s crucial to find ticks and remove them quickly. Why? Some ticks carry bacteria that cause disease (such as Lyme disease, but there are many others). And all you need is one undetected tick bite for your pet to become infected. They can become sick and develop kidney problems. At times, these diseases can be fatal.

Ugh! Is there any good news?

Yes!

We’re here to help when it comes to flea allergies, tick and internal parasite checks. Even if your pet is on regular monthly preventive, it is still important for us to make sure your pet is healthy.

Make an appointment for your pet’s annual checkup today – we’ll give them a thorough physical exam from nose to tail. Let’s also confirm the prevention you’re using is right for your pet!

Read Full Post »

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Your pet’s yearly checkup is vital to their health. Make that appointment today!

As your pet ages, you may start to notice mysterious new bumps on its body. Or lumps. Missing fur. A black spot. A funny-looking toenail. Even young pets can develop such external oddities. Are these things nothing, or something of concern?

For even the most observant owners, it’s tough to know what skin issues are ok and what needs further evaluation. Yes, your pet may have skin disease and you may not even realize it. For example, your pet’s missing fur may be a bald spot from a tumble or a fungus

And if your pet has a little bump, it may be cancer. If it’s left unchecked, the bump may become larger and harder to remove, which may put your pet’s health at risk. But if we take a look early enough, we may be able to keep a little problem now from becoming a big problem in the future.

And finally, that black “spot” you thought was a freckle on your pet, may be a tick! If our team removes it within a certain amount of time, your pet will likely not be infected by a tick-borne disease

Skin is the largest organ of your pet’s body, and there’s a lot to examine. When you bring your pet in for its yearly checkup, we’ll assess every part of it, from nose to tail! We’ll look for spots, rashes, warts, skin tags and everything in between to make sure your pet stays healthy.

It’s time to schedule your pet’s yearly checkup. We’ll perform a thorough skin check and a few other easy tests if needed to keep your pet healthy and happy. Make an appointment today!

*************************************************************
Photo by Jennifer Miele at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »