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Posts Tagged ‘ticks’

3 Weird Pet Problems You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

As a pet owner, you do your best to protect your pet from typical known hazards, such as diseases, traffic, heat stroke, and the like…but there are some weird problems pets can come up with that you’ve probably never heard of. For example:

  1. Tick bite paralysis…While not very common, this very real condition occurs when a female tick releases a toxin into a dog while feeding. Signs of tick bite paralysis show up 6-9 days after a tick has attached itself to a dog. The toxin affects the nerves carrying signals between the spinal cord and muscles. [Cats are less frequently affected by this toxin.]
    It is important to find and remove all ticks on the affected dog — and to bring the pet to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for treatment, especially if the pet is having trouble breathing.
    What are the early warning signs of tick-bite paralysis? Read this article to get the full scoop.
  2. Water intoxication…According to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, water intoxication, though rare, usually occurs during the warmer months when pets spend time at the beach or in a pool.
    Signs of water intoxication include nausea, vomiting, lethargy, difficulty breathing, and a swollen belly. In severe cases, the pet may be weak, unable to walk properly (stumbling), have seizures, have an abnormally slow heart rate, exhibit hypothermia (low body temperature), or even go into a coma.
    Pets that are suspected of having water intoxication should be taken to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for life-saving treatment.

    Which pets are most at risk for water intoxication? Read this article to find out.
  3. Toxic vomit…If your pet eats a rodent poison containing zinc phosphide, the chemical can mix with stomach acids and water to create dangerous phosphine gas. If your pet vomits, the gas is released into the air, which can lead to poisoning in people and pets. Phosphine gas can smell like garlic or rotting fish — or it may be odorless.
    If you suspect your pet has ingested rodent poison, call the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (1-888-426-4435) and take your pet to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for treatment.
    Which poisons contain the ingredient zinc phosphide? Read this article to get the list.

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This article is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or suggest a treatment for any disease or disorder. This article is not a substitute for veterinary care or a client-doctor-patient relationship, nor does it constitute such a relationship. Your pet’s veterinarian is the best source of information regarding your pet’s health.

Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff is responsible for outcomes based on information available on this site.

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Attention concerned dog owners: As the weather warms up, fleas and ticks will be out in full force. And since dogs [and their owners] become more active outside in the warm weather, they will be more exposed to harmful pests.

At Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, we’re stocked up on 8-month Seresto flea & tick collars for dogs of all sizes –PLUS we’ll help you get a $15 manufacturer rebate!

Contact Us to reserve a Seresto flea & tick collar today!

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Baked bean? Nope – it’s an engorged, dead tick, thoughtfully preserved for the enlightenment of future generations of pet owners. Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Can we all agree that ticks are disgusting? Yes? Good!

Now, let’s talk about how to remove ticks from your pet. There are right ways and wrong ways to remove ticks. You’re going to want to do it the right way.

Do This to Remove Ticks:

  • Check for and remove ticks as soon as possible, to help prevent the transmission of disease.
  • Wear gloves, to avoid transmission of disease from the tick.
  • Use tweezers or a tick removal device to do the job.
  • Grasp the tick firmly, as close to the pet’s skin as possible, and pull back slowly and steadily.
  • Clean the area with soap and water after the tick has been removed.
  • Place the tick (or ticks) in a small container and bring it to your pet’s doctor for examination. Different ticks carry different diseases, so tick identification is an important part of treatment.

…But Don’t Do That:

  • Don’t try burning or heating up the tick. You are more likely to injure your pet this way.
  • Don’t try to “smother” the tick with petroleum jelly or fingernail polish. It’s a time-waster, and time is critical in preventing the transmission of tick-borne diseases.
  • Don’t crush or yank the tick, and don’t twist it. Doing so could increase your pet’s risk of exposure to disease.
  • Don’t fret about not removing the mouthparts. Some ticks have very long mouthparts that are cemented in place for the feeding. It’s not worth the hassle of going in after them, according to Dr. Glen Needham, an expert on ticks who recently spoke on the subject with Norfolk veterinarians.

In the Future:

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Protect your dog from fleas and ticks this summer
with NexGard chewables.

NexGard protects your dog from fleas and ticks with an easy, tasty monthly chewable treat. Little Creek Veterinary Clinic is the place to purchase NexGard for dogs weighing 4 – 60 lbs*. 

NexGard is available by prescription only. Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends NexGard chewables, especially for dogs that have dry, irritated, or inflamed skin, which are not ideal surfaces for topical flea treatments.

Contact Us to learn more about protecting your dog with NexGard.

*Our online pharmacy will ship orders for dogs over 60 pounds.

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You asked for it — we’ve got it!

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Little Creek Veterinary Clinic now carries NexGard Chewables – the monthly oral flea and tick protection by the makers of HeartGard.

NexGard Chewables kill fleas before they can lay eggs, and it keeps working all month long.
Because NexGard is an oral flea treatment, your pet can be bathed or go swimming as many times as you like, without sacrificing flea control efficacy.

NexGard is proven to kill Black-legged ticks, American Dog ticks, Lone Star ticks, and Brown dog ticks – all month long.

NexGard is safe to use in dogs and puppies 8 weeks and older, weighing 4 or more pounds.

Little Creek Veterinary Clinic now has for sale NexGard Chewables for dogs weighing 4 pounds – 60 pounds.

NexGard Chewables are a prescription medication — so we will need to see your pet before we can dispense it.

Contact Us today at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic and ask about Nexgard Chewables flea and tick treatment for dogs.

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April is Prevention of Lyme Disease in Dogs Month

What is Lyme Disease? Lyme Disease is an illness caused by Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria, which are carried in the midgut of deer ticks and transmitted to dogs through a tick bite. Symptoms of Lyme Disease include lameness that shifts from leg to leg, swollen joints, lack of appetite, depression, fever, difficulty breathing. As the disease progresses, it can cause serious injury to the dog’s kidneys.

How do dogs get Lyme Disease? When a deer tick carrying B. burgdorferi feeds on a dog for at least 48 hours, the bacteria are “awakened” and travel out of the tick’s midgut, into the dog’s bloodstream, through the site of the tick bite. 

Baked bean? Nope – it’s an engorged, dead tick, thoughtfully preserved for the enlightenment of future generations of pet owners. Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

This is not a deer tick, but it is a well-fed tick.

Here’s where it gets a little technical: While the bacteria, B. burgdorferi, resides in the tick’s gut, they are protected by a special coating called Outer Surface Protein A (OspA).  A dog that is vaccinated for Lyme Disease has — circulating in its blood — antibodies to OspA. When the tick ingests the blood, the OspA antibodies travel to the tick’s midgut and attack the B. burgdorferi there — before they’ve had a chance to awaken and mobilize.

So, rather than the vaccine-induced antibodies attacking an organism that has already entered the dog’s body, they instead attack the organisms outside the dog’s body, while still in the host. That is why we — cheekily — refer to it as “vaccinating the tick.”

Think of Lyme Disease vaccine as the vaccine that stops an organism before it reaches your pet: like an invisible force field! Pretty cool, huh?

But remember: deer ticks and other ticks can transmit nasty diseases in addition to Lyme Disease. There is no vaccine (yet) for Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Ehrlichiosis, Anaplasmosis (and the list goes on.) For that reason, we recommend year-round tick control, like the Seresto collar. Stop those little pests cold!

Ready to vaccinate your dog against Lyme Disease? Contact Us to schedule an appointment.

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The Seresto 8-month Flea and Tick collars continue to impress our clients with its ease of use and effectiveness against ectoparasites. In response, we are keeping a steady supply of the collars on hand.

Good news! We have also begun carrying the Seresto collars for cats. 

Seresto cat

The Seresto $15 rebate is coming to an end in two weeks,
on September 30th.
Be sure to stop in and grab a collar for your pet today!

Seresto rebate

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