Posts Tagged ‘ticks’

Warmer days are on the way, and you’ll soon be spending more time outdoors with your pets. That means protecting your dogs and cats from ticks — a little pest that can cause big problems.

Remember: you can protect your dog inside and out with tick preventatives and the Lyme Disease vaccine. (Cats do not receive the Lyme vaccine.)

If your dog is not up-to-date on the Lyme Disease vaccine, Contact Us to schedule a visit.

Read Full Post »

Engorged tick – not a common sight in winter – but a possible one

I can imagine what you might be thinking as you read this post: “Why would anyone talk about ticks in winter? Ticks are a summertime problem!”

Keep reading! By the end of this post, you’ll understand why I’m talking ticks in winter.

Here are TEN TICK FACTS you may not know (yet):

  • Ticks are found on every continent on Earth — including Antarctica
  • Ticks carry the second highest number of dangerous human diseases (Mosquitoes are still #1. Yay.)
  • Ticks can be carried by birds, which may “help” different types of ticks migrate from one state to another
  • Ticks can survive freezing temperatures
  • Ticks can live underwater (Flushing ticks won’t kill them!)
  • Ticks can live up to 3 years
  • Lone Star tick bites can cause a red meat allergy in people
  • Brown dog ticks like to live around the foundations of houses and in urban areas
  • Cats can get ticks and Lyme Disease
  • Differing species of ticks emerge throughout the year

More about that last fact: the Black-legged tick (or deer tick) which carries the bacteria that causes Lyme Disease, is active in different life stages all year.

Spring/Summer: Larvae hatch from eggs and begin looking for their first blood meal. Also during this time, older nymphs begin feeding and are able to transmit Lyme Disease-causing bacteria.

Autumn/Winter: Adult deer ticks feed on deer, dogs, cats, and people and can transmit the bacteria that causes Lyme Disease.

[View the lifecycle chart created by the Minnesota Department of Health here.]

Contact Us at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic to discuss flea & tick prevention* for your dog or cat. We can recommend products that are safe to use year-round.

There are many products on the market — let us help you sort through them!

(*This offer is open to clients of Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, [Norfolk, VA] only.)

Tick facts courtesy of Dr. Elyse Persico, and Dr. Holly Gaff & the Tick Team at Old Dominion University

Read Full Post »

3 Weird Pet Problems You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

As a pet owner, you do your best to protect your pet from typical known hazards, such as diseases, traffic, heat stroke, and the like…but there are some weird problems pets can come up with that you’ve probably never heard of. For example:

  1. Tick bite paralysis…While not very common, this very real condition occurs when a female tick releases a toxin into a dog while feeding. Signs of tick bite paralysis show up 6-9 days after a tick has attached itself to a dog. The toxin affects the nerves carrying signals between the spinal cord and muscles. [Cats are less frequently affected by this toxin.]
    It is important to find and remove all ticks on the affected dog — and to bring the pet to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for treatment, especially if the pet is having trouble breathing.
    What are the early warning signs of tick-bite paralysis? Read this article to get the full scoop.
  2. Water intoxication…According to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, water intoxication, though rare, usually occurs during the warmer months when pets spend time at the beach or in a pool.
    Signs of water intoxication include nausea, vomiting, lethargy, difficulty breathing, and a swollen belly. In severe cases, the pet may be weak, unable to walk properly (stumbling), have seizures, have an abnormally slow heart rate, exhibit hypothermia (low body temperature), or even go into a coma.
    Pets that are suspected of having water intoxication should be taken to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for life-saving treatment.

    Which pets are most at risk for water intoxication? Read this article to find out.
  3. Toxic vomit…If your pet eats a rodent poison containing zinc phosphide, the chemical can mix with stomach acids and water to create dangerous phosphine gas. If your pet vomits, the gas is released into the air, which can lead to poisoning in people and pets. Phosphine gas can smell like garlic or rotting fish — or it may be odorless.
    If you suspect your pet has ingested rodent poison, call the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (1-888-426-4435) and take your pet to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for treatment.
    Which poisons contain the ingredient zinc phosphide? Read this article to get the list.

***************************************************************

This article is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or suggest a treatment for any disease or disorder. This article is not a substitute for veterinary care or a client-doctor-patient relationship, nor does it constitute such a relationship. Your pet’s veterinarian is the best source of information regarding your pet’s health.

Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff is responsible for outcomes based on information available on this site.

Read Full Post »

Attention concerned dog owners: As the weather warms up, fleas and ticks will be out in full force. And since dogs [and their owners] become more active outside in the warm weather, they will be more exposed to harmful pests.

At Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, we’re stocked up on 8-month Seresto flea & tick collars for dogs of all sizes –PLUS we’ll help you get a $15 manufacturer rebate!

Contact Us to reserve a Seresto flea & tick collar today!

Read Full Post »

Baked bean? Nope – it’s an engorged, dead tick, thoughtfully preserved for the enlightenment of future generations of pet owners. Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Can we all agree that ticks are disgusting? Yes? Good!

Now, let’s talk about how to remove ticks from your pet. There are right ways and wrong ways to remove ticks. You’re going to want to do it the right way.

Do This to Remove Ticks:

  • Check for and remove ticks as soon as possible, to help prevent the transmission of disease.
  • Wear gloves, to avoid transmission of disease from the tick.
  • Use tweezers or a tick removal device to do the job.
  • Grasp the tick firmly, as close to the pet’s skin as possible, and pull back slowly and steadily.
  • Clean the area with soap and water after the tick has been removed.
  • Place the tick (or ticks) in a small container and bring it to your pet’s doctor for examination. Different ticks carry different diseases, so tick identification is an important part of treatment.

…But Don’t Do That:

  • Don’t try burning or heating up the tick. You are more likely to injure your pet this way.
  • Don’t try to “smother” the tick with petroleum jelly or fingernail polish. It’s a time-waster, and time is critical in preventing the transmission of tick-borne diseases.
  • Don’t crush or yank the tick, and don’t twist it. Doing so could increase your pet’s risk of exposure to disease.
  • Don’t fret about not removing the mouthparts. Some ticks have very long mouthparts that are cemented in place for the feeding. It’s not worth the hassle of going in after them, according to Dr. Glen Needham, an expert on ticks who recently spoke on the subject with Norfolk veterinarians.

In the Future:

Read Full Post »

Protect your dog from fleas and ticks this summer
with NexGard chewables.

NexGard protects your dog from fleas and ticks with an easy, tasty monthly chewable treat. Little Creek Veterinary Clinic is the place to purchase NexGard for dogs weighing 4 – 60 lbs*. 

NexGard is available by prescription only. Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends NexGard chewables, especially for dogs that have dry, irritated, or inflamed skin, which are not ideal surfaces for topical flea treatments.

Contact Us to learn more about protecting your dog with NexGard.

*Our online pharmacy will ship orders for dogs over 60 pounds.

Read Full Post »

You asked for it — we’ve got it!

P1140794

Little Creek Veterinary Clinic now carries NexGard Chewables – the monthly oral flea and tick protection by the makers of HeartGard.

NexGard Chewables kill fleas before they can lay eggs, and it keeps working all month long.
Because NexGard is an oral flea treatment, your pet can be bathed or go swimming as many times as you like, without sacrificing flea control efficacy.

NexGard is proven to kill Black-legged ticks, American Dog ticks, Lone Star ticks, and Brown dog ticks – all month long.

NexGard is safe to use in dogs and puppies 8 weeks and older, weighing 4 or more pounds.

Little Creek Veterinary Clinic now has for sale NexGard Chewables for dogs weighing 4 pounds – 60 pounds.

NexGard Chewables are a prescription medication — so we will need to see your pet before we can dispense it.

Contact Us today at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic and ask about Nexgard Chewables flea and tick treatment for dogs.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »