Posts Tagged ‘tick prevention’

Engorged tick – not a common sight in winter – but a possible one

I can imagine what you might be thinking as you read this post: “Why would anyone talk about ticks in winter? Ticks are a summertime problem!”

Keep reading! By the end of this post, you’ll understand why I’m talking ticks in winter.

Here are TEN TICK FACTS you may not know (yet):

  • Ticks are found on every continent on Earth — including Antarctica
  • Ticks carry the second highest number of dangerous human diseases (Mosquitoes are still #1. Yay.)
  • Ticks can be carried by birds, which may “help” different types of ticks migrate from one state to another
  • Ticks can survive freezing temperatures
  • Ticks can live underwater (Flushing ticks won’t kill them!)
  • Ticks can live up to 3 years
  • Lone Star tick bites can cause a red meat allergy in people
  • Brown dog ticks like to live around the foundations of houses and in urban areas
  • Cats can get ticks and Lyme Disease
  • Differing species of ticks emerge throughout the year

More about that last fact: the Black-legged tick (or deer tick) which carries the bacteria that causes Lyme Disease, is active in different life stages all year.

Spring/Summer: Larvae hatch from eggs and begin looking for their first blood meal. Also during this time, older nymphs begin feeding and are able to transmit Lyme Disease-causing bacteria.

Autumn/Winter: Adult deer ticks feed on deer, dogs, cats, and people and can transmit the bacteria that causes Lyme Disease.

[View the lifecycle chart created by the Minnesota Department of Health here.]

Contact Us at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic to discuss flea & tick prevention* for your dog or cat. We can recommend products that are safe to use year-round.

There are many products on the market — let us help you sort through them!

(*This offer is open to clients of Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, [Norfolk, VA] only.)

Tick facts courtesy of Dr. Elyse Persico, and Dr. Holly Gaff & the Tick Team at Old Dominion University

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