Posts Tagged ‘snake identification’

Warmer days are here, which means reptiles are ready to have their day[s] in the sun. This means that your dog or cat could get up close and personal with a snake while sniffing around outside. 

Copperhead snake in leaf litter

This copperhead snake blends in well with the leaves at York River State Park.

Cities in Hampton Roads (including Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Chesapeake, and Portsmouth) are home to a variety of venomous and non-venomous snakes.

Non-venomous snakes can certainly bite if threatened and the bite can be painful. Local types include the garter snake, rat snake, watersnake, greensnake, and more.

Venomous snakes, which pack a powerful dose of toxin in their bite, include the copperhead, canebrake (or timber) rattlesnake, and the cottonmouth (aka water moccasin). Their bite is dangerous and is considered an emergency.

The copperhead, canebrake rattlesnake, and cottonmouth are known for their patterns of brown, tan, and black colors — but did you know that other snakes have similar coloring, especially when young?

When attempting to identify a snake, it can be helpful to look for a triangular-shaped head, which indicates a venomous snake — but not everyone wants to get that close.

The Virginia Herpetological Society maintains a list of snakes found in the state, along with maps of their common habitats across Virginia, and photos to help with indentification. Check it out here:
https://virginiaherpetologicalsociety.com/reptiles/snakes/snakes_of_virginia.html

For information on what to do if your pet is bitten by a snake and how to help prevent encounters with snakes, visit https://www.petmd.com/dog/care/evr_dg_snake_bites_and_dogs.

If you believe your pet has been bitten by a snake, contact your local veterinary emergency hospital right away!

Do not attempt to handle a snake yourself. Call a critter control company to safely remove snakes from your home or yard.


Photo credit: Virginia State Parks / CC BY (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)

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