Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Seresto’

Attention concerned dog owners: As the weather warms up, fleas and ticks will be out in full force. And since dogs [and their owners] become more active outside in the warm weather, they will be more exposed to harmful pests.

At Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, we’re stocked up on 8-month Seresto flea & tick collars for dogs of all sizes –PLUS we’ll help you get a $15 manufacturer rebate!

Contact Us to reserve a Seresto flea & tick collar today!

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

It’s autumn in Norfolk, Virginia — and we’re still talking about fleas!

Sure, nights in Norfolk are getting frosty — but not nearly enough to kill fleas. Fleas are hardy little bugs, and they’re like heat-seeking missiles. Once fleas get indoors, they want to cuddle with you and your pets. You don’t have to put up with their unwanted advances, though.

At Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, we’ve got an arsenal of flea control products on our shelves, designed for use on dogs and cats. Our veterinarian, Dr. Miele, recommends the following flea control products —

Topical spot-ons
Advantage II
Combiva [new]
Revolution (for cats)

Collar
Seresto

Oral
NexGard

Except for Combiva, the products above have special offers for rebates or extra products, through November or the end of the year.

Let’s talk about which flea control product is right for your pet, and stop fleas from settling in for a cozy winter stay in your house.

Autumn brings all good things - and fleas. Photo by Jennifer Miele

Autumn brings all good things – and fleas.
Photo by Jennifer Miele

Read Full Post »

The Seresto Flea and Tick Collar rebate ends November 30th,

so be sure to get your pet’s next collar soon!

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Read Full Post »

April is Prevention of Lyme Disease in Dogs Month

What is Lyme Disease? Lyme Disease is an illness caused by Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria, which are carried in the midgut of deer ticks and transmitted to dogs through a tick bite. Symptoms of Lyme Disease include lameness that shifts from leg to leg, swollen joints, lack of appetite, depression, fever, difficulty breathing. As the disease progresses, it can cause serious injury to the dog’s kidneys.

How do dogs get Lyme Disease? When a deer tick carrying B. burgdorferi feeds on a dog for at least 48 hours, the bacteria are “awakened” and travel out of the tick’s midgut, into the dog’s bloodstream, through the site of the tick bite. 

Baked bean? Nope – it’s an engorged, dead tick, thoughtfully preserved for the enlightenment of future generations of pet owners. Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

This is not a deer tick, but it is a well-fed tick.

Here’s where it gets a little technical: While the bacteria, B. burgdorferi, resides in the tick’s gut, they are protected by a special coating called Outer Surface Protein A (OspA).  A dog that is vaccinated for Lyme Disease has — circulating in its blood — antibodies to OspA. When the tick ingests the blood, the OspA antibodies travel to the tick’s midgut and attack the B. burgdorferi there — before they’ve had a chance to awaken and mobilize.

So, rather than the vaccine-induced antibodies attacking an organism that has already entered the dog’s body, they instead attack the organisms outside the dog’s body, while still in the host. That is why we — cheekily — refer to it as “vaccinating the tick.”

Think of Lyme Disease vaccine as the vaccine that stops an organism before it reaches your pet: like an invisible force field! Pretty cool, huh?

But remember: deer ticks and other ticks can transmit nasty diseases in addition to Lyme Disease. There is no vaccine (yet) for Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Ehrlichiosis, Anaplasmosis (and the list goes on.) For that reason, we recommend year-round tick control, like the Seresto collar. Stop those little pests cold!

Ready to vaccinate your dog against Lyme Disease? Contact Us to schedule an appointment.

Read Full Post »

The Seresto 8-month Flea and Tick collars continue to impress our clients with its ease of use and effectiveness against ectoparasites. In response, we are keeping a steady supply of the collars on hand.

Good news! We have also begun carrying the Seresto collars for cats. 

Seresto cat

The Seresto $15 rebate is coming to an end in two weeks,
on September 30th.
Be sure to stop in and grab a collar for your pet today!

Seresto rebate

Read Full Post »

We published this post last year, but it’s as true now as it was then: tick populations are on the rise across the US, even in the southern states.

According to a recent interview with leading parasitologists, published by Veterinary Practice Newswe can expect to see more ticks this year for the following reasons:

  • Warmer winters
  • Suburbanization, which brings together people, wildlife and ticks
  • An increase in white-tailed deer
  • Migratory birds that carry ticks to new areas
  • A movement toward the preservation of open space and the replanting of trees
  • The use of fewer insecticides

This news is cause for concern for everyone. Those of us who have dogs and cats that venture outdoors must not ignore the risk to our pets. That means protecting our pets, as well as ourselves.

Ticks are carriers for the following six diseases:

  • Lyme Disease
  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
  • Ehrlichiosis
  • Anaplasmosis
  • Babesiosis
  • Tularemia
Baked bean? Nope – it’s an engorged, dead tick, thoughtfully preserved for the enlightenment of future generations of pet owners. Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Baked bean? Nope – it’s an engorged, dead tick, thoughtfully preserved for the enlightenment of future generations of pet owners. Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Get links to articles on each disease here and learn how to protect yourself and your family.

We can help protect your pet with a Lyme Disease vaccination and a Seresto collar, so let us know if you and your pet will be doing any of the following activities:

  • hiking, especially in wooded or grassy areas, such as state and public parks
  • camping
  • travelling
  • hunting

Of course, ticks can be found right in your own backyard, so keep an eye out for these pests – and if you see one on your dog or cat, tell us!

In fact, we’ve begun hearing from more clients who are finding ticks on their cats — and those cats are not going hiking with their owners. That means ticks are very much a backyard problem in this area.

Found a tick on your pet?
Watch this video from About.com that explains the Do’s and Don’t’s of tick removal.

Need a tick removal device?
I searched Amazon.com and came up with this list of tick removal devices, including the crow-bar type shown in the video.

Other resource on the pending tick explosion:
Companion Animal Parasite Council

********************************************************************
Originally published April 9, 2013.

Read Full Post »