Posts Tagged ‘Revolution’

Does your cat have itchy ears? The Number One cause of itchy ears in cats is ear mites, according to Dr. Lynette Cole of Ohio State University.

At a recent lecture attended by Norfolk veterinarians and their staff, Dr. Cole listed the top three most common causes of itchy, inflamed ears in cats: parasites, polyps, and allergies.

Ear mites, which are a type of parasite, appear to be tiny white specks that move around, when seen through a magnifier such as an otoscope

Veterinary otoscope, used to examine ears.

 

Looking through an otoscope at a model cat ear.

Seen under a microscope, however, the situation becomes much more clear. Ear mites, known also as Otodectes cynotis, have eight legs and are very active crawlers. And if that weren’t enough Ick Factor — ear mites are arachnids, putting them in the same class as spiders and ticks.

Ear mite removed from a kitten. Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Ear mite removed from a kitten. (2) Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

What’s the first sign of ear mites? Since you can’t see the mites with your naked eye, the first visible sign of a problem may be a layer of crusty, black debris in your pet’s ear. Sometimes it looks like coffee grounds. By the time this debris appears, your cat is probably scratching her ears, which may be what prompts you to look inside the ears.

Since there may be other causes of “crud” in the ears, you’ll want your cat’s veterinarian to examine the ears to find out if ear mites are present. Then, the veterinarian will devise an appropriate treatment plan.

Ear mites can be transmitted from one pet to another, so the veterinarian may advise treating all pets in the household at the same time.

Check out these videos we’ve uploaded to our You Tube channel, featuring the ear mites shown in the photos above. One mite is mired in mineral oil, while the other mite speeds out of view!

Does your cat have itchy ears or suspicious-looking debris inside? Contact Us to schedule an appointment today!

[Our doctor cannot diagnose your pet over the phone or the Internet, so please schedule an appointment today.]

Bonus: Our cat patients that are treated with Revolution to protect against fleas, heartworms, and intestinal worms are also receiving protection from ear mites!

Revolution Rewards details here.

Read Full Post »

Attention Users of Feline Revolution: The free dose program has ended and has been replaced with a new purchase rewards program.

For every 3 doses purchased, you can earn points which convert to dollars, which are loaded onto a prepaid VISA card, once you’ve reached a minimum of 100 points (= $10). See program FAQs here.

Buy 6 doses, earn $15

Buy 9 doses, earn $25 

Buy 12 doses, earn $35

Registration is FREE. Sign up here:  https://www.zoetispetcare.com/rewards/offers/revolution

 

Why Revolution? We asked Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic:

Revolution is safe to use on cats and is especially recommended for those that venture outdoors. Your “outdoor” cat is exposed to more natural pests than a cat that stays inside.

But remember: certain pests, like mosquitoes and fleas, can easily migrate indoors, exposing your “indoor” cats to heartworms and tapeworms. And certain pests, like houseflies and cockroaches, can carry roundworms, exposing any pet that likes to eat bugs.

Also, cats that go outside can bring ear mites and intestinal worms indoors and share them with the homebodies.

Revolution protects your indoor and outdoor cats against:

Revolution is available to your 5-15 lb cat by prescription only. To schedule an appointment, Contact Us today.

Read Full Post »

Freaky and Fun Flea Facts

Magnified flea. Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Magnified flea.
Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Did You Know?

  • Fleas lay eggs in your pet’s fur; then the eggs roll and drop off into the carpet, onto the furniture, or outdoors.
  • Squirrels, opossums, raccoons, stray dogs and cats can all carry flea eggs into your yard.
  • Fleas can hatch in as little as 2 or 3 weeks, or they can wait for several months and spring themselves on you and your pets when you least expect it.
  • After they feed and mate, female fleas begin laying eggs within 24 hours.
  • Each female flea produces 40 to 50 eggs per day — which adds up to hundreds of eggs in days or possibly thousands of eggs, given enough time. One pair of fleas can infest your home with their offspring!
  • Don’t forget the cat! Many households are infested because of untreated cats that act as reservoirs for fleas. While you’re picking up flea control for the dog, make sure to buy some for your cat, as well.
  • Common household spots for hatching flea eggs and squirming larvae include: in pet beds, under furniture, deep in carpets.
  • Outdoors, fleas like to hang out in shady, undisturbed areas like porches, decks, stairs, and doghouses.
  • Young fleas go dormant in our winter climate and emerge as adults as the weather warms up.
  • Fleas carry Tapeworms. If your dog or cat swallows a flea while grooming itself, it can get Tapeworms.
  • Cats that have fleas can carry Bartonella henselae – the bacteria responsible for Cat Scratch Disease.

So, how can you control flea infestations at home? Try these methods:

  • Treat all dogs and cats in the household. Ask about safe treatments for other furry friends like ferrets, rabbits, chinchillas, rats, etc. Not all products are suitable for pocket pets. When in doubt, check with the manufacturer.
  • Indoors, vacuum regularly. Lift and move furniture for a thorough cleaning.
  • To treat carpets and upholstery, try a safe product like Fleabusters Rx for Fleas.
  • Wash pet bedding and people bedding routinely.
  • Keep baseboards and nooks and crannies clean.
  • Eliminate weeds and brush piles; keep the lawn mowed.
  • Keep rodents away from your home.
  • Treat your yard with outdoor flea control products.

 

********************************************************************
Information for this article was adapted from the Companion Animal Parasite Council and dvm360.com.

This article was originally posted on Aug. 22, 2014.

Read Full Post »

FALSE.

Even cats that stay indoors their entire lives are at risk for parasitic infections. Why?

Because mosquitos, which transmit heartworm disease, often sneak into our homes.

Because fleas, which transmit tapeworms, often reside in our homes.

Because flies, which transmit roundworms, often buzz around inside our homes.

And if your cat is anything like mine, it loves to chase, catch, and eat bugs!

These are just some of the reasons your cat’s feces should be checked one to two times a year for parasites.

It’s also why we recommend Revolution for indoor cats. Revolution protects your cat against fleas, heartworms, roundworms, and ear mites.

Click on the graphic below to learn more about cats and parasites — then talk to us about protecting your indoor cat from heartworms, tapeworms, and roundworms.

Click to enlarge.

Click to enlarge.

Read Full Post »

Now that Hampton Roads is having the occasional warm day,
bugs are on the march — right toward your pets!
Even indoor cats can be plagued by pests,
so take advantage of this great offer from Revolution.

Here’s the deal:

Buy 6* tubes of Revolution for cats, Get 2 tubes FREE

OR

Buy 9* tubes of Revolution for cats, Get 3 tubes FREE

Healthy Dose of Savings 004

*Tubes are sold in packs of 3.

Why Revolution?

Revolution is safe to use on cats and is especially recommended for those that venture outdoors. Your “outdoor” cat is exposed to more natural pests than a cat that stays inside.

But there’s a catch: certain pests, like mosquitoes and fleas, can easily migrate indoors, exposing your “indoor” cats to heartworms and tapeworms.

Also, cats that go outside can bring ear mites and intestinal worms indoors and share them with the homebodies.

Revolution protects your indoor and outdoor cats against:

Purchase Revolution at our clinic and get a Healthy Dose of Savings!
**********************************************************
Original post here.

Read Full Post »

Today’s research shows that some respiratory illnesses in cats, previously believed to be feline asthma or bronchitis may actually be Heartworm Associated Respiratory Disease (HARD).

Heartworm larvae (immature worms) — spread through the bite of a mosquito — migrate to the cat’s lungs where they produce inflammation, leading to breathing difficulties.

Interestingly, dying larvae can also cause inflammation. A few larvae may grow to adulthood, but the death of adult heartworms can produce an inflammatory response so severe that it can cause sudden death in a cat.

KnowHeartworms.org has identified 13 signs that may indicate the presence of heartworms in a cat:

  • anorexia
  • blindness
  • collapse
  • convulsions
  • coughing
  • diarrhea
  • difficulty breathing
  • fainting
  • lethargy
  • rapid heart rate
  • sudden death
  • vomiting
  • weight loss

Other health problems (including kidney disease, Feline Leukemia, hyperthyroidism, and diabetes, among others) may cause some of the same symptoms listed above.

Adding to the confusion is the fact that heartworm disease is difficult to diagnose in cats — as compared to dogs, in which a simple blood test can detect the presence of worms.

And as previously mentioned, heartworm disease in cats is not curable.

However, heartworm disease and HARD are preventable, through the use of products like Revolution. The best time to start your cat on Revolution is before it develops symptoms of HARD

Healthy Dose of Savings 004

Revolution is designed to be safe for use in cats that may already be infected with heartworms, and it can prevent further infections. Revolution also protects cats from fleas, roundworms, hookworms, and ear mites.

If your cat is currently on a flea-only treatment, it is easy to switch to Revolution – just ask!

***********************************************************************************

Originally posted on April 18, 2013.

Read Full Post »

New research shows that some respiratory illnesses in cats, previously believed to be feline asthma or bronchitis may actually be Heartworm Associated Respiratory Disease (HARD).

Heartworm larvae (immature worms) — spread through the bite of a mosquito — migrate to the cat’s lungs where they produce inflammation, leading to breathing difficulties.

Interestingly, dying larvae can also cause inflammation. A few larvae may grow to adulthood, but the death of adult heartworms can produce an inflammatory response so severe that it can cause sudden death in a cat.

KnowHeartworms.org has identified 13 signs that may indicate the presence of heartworms in a cat:

  • anorexia
  • blindness
  • collapse
  • convulsions
  • coughing
  • diarrhea
  • difficulty breathing
  • fainting
  • lethargy
  • rapid heart rate
  • sudden death
  • vomiting
  • weight loss

Other health problems (including kidney disease, Feline Leukemia, hyperthyroidism, and diabetes, among others) may cause some of the same symptoms listed above.

Adding to the confusion is the fact that heartworm disease is difficult to diagnose in cats — as compared to dogs, in which a simple blood test can detect the presence of worms.

And as previously mentioned, heartworm disease in cats is not curable.

However, heartworm disease and HARD are preventable, through the use of products like Revolution. The best time to start your cat on Revolution is before it develops symptoms of HARD

Healthy Dose of Savings 004

Revolution is designed to be safe for use in cats that may already be infected with heartworms, and it can prevent further infections. Revolution also protects cats from fleas, roundworms, hookworms, and ear mites.

If your cat is currently on a flea-only treatment, it is easy to switch to Revolution – just ask!

Read Full Post »

April is Heartworm Awareness Month for dog owners.

Scratch that —

April is Heartworm Awareness Month for dog and cat owners.

New poster 2

Fact: Heartworms are spread by mosquitoes.

Fact: Mosquitoes don’t just feed on us; they take blood meals from cats and dogs, too.

Fact: Mosquitoes often find their way into our houses, putting “indoor” pets at risk for Heartworm Disease.

Here’s what else you need to know right now:

  • Heartworm disease is preventable, thanks to products like HeartGard, Iverhart Max, and Revolution.
  • It only takes a single heartworm to cause a fatal reaction in cats.
  • Heartworm disease is difficult to diagnose in cats; tests can return false negative results.
  • There is no cure for heartworm disease in cats.
  • Treatment for heartworm infection in dogs is costly, painful, and can be fatal.
Choose your weapon in the fight against heartworm disease.

Choose your weapon in the fight against heartworm disease.

Get more information on Feline Heartworm Disease from KnowHeartworms.org.

Heartworm prevention bonus: Most prescription heartworm preventatives also contain protection against intestinal worms (which can be spread to humans) and some contain protection against fleas or other parasites. That’s a lot of bang for your buck!

Read Full Post »

Which heartworm preventative is right for your pet?

     If you’ve ever skipped giving your pet its heartworm medicine because you figure last month’s dose will carry over, you could be making a deadly mistake.

     Pet owners might assume that the heartworm preventative medication stays in the pet’s body all month long, providing constant protection against parasites.  But that’s not how the medications work.

How does it work?
     When you give your pet its dose of heartworm preventative each month, it immediately goes to work killing off heartworms that have infected the body in the prior 30 days.  The medication then leaves the body, often 24-48 hours after dosing.  Your pet is then left “unprotected” for 30 days until you give the next dose.

     It is important to remember to give the medication on time, because worms that are allowed to grow past a certain stage will not be killed by the medication; instead they will continue on to maturity.  Have a look at this example:

April 4………..your pet receives its monthly heartworm preventative dose, which is designed to kill heartworm larvae acquired since the previous dose in March.

April 7………your pet is bitten by a mosquito and is infected with heartworms.

May 4………your pet is due for its monthly dose, but you have forgotten to give it; the larval infection is now 27 days old and is still in the range to be removed by the medication.

May 17……the larval infection is now 40 days old, but you haven’t remembered the dose yet.

June 4…..the larval infection is 58 days old; many have become juvenile worms and will outlive the heartworm dose that you remember to give today.  In another few weeks, the juvenile worms will enter the heart and lungs where they will mature and reproduce.

What if I keep giving the medicine?
     Eventually, the mature heartworms will produce babies (we call them “microfilariae.”)  Here’s where it gets tricky:  the monthly heartworm medicine also kills the microfilariae.  That might sound like a good thing, and in a way, it is:  without circulating microfilariae in the blood, your dog will not pose an infection risk to other pets (cats generally don’t exhibit this stage, so they do not pose a risk to other animals.) 

     Unfortunately, the absence of this stage of disease also produces false negative test results.  Because there are different ways to test for “baby” heartworms versus adult heartworms, it is crucial that you tell your vet if your pet has missed any heartworm doses, especially in the last six months or more.  With this information, the vet can choose the proper test to determine whether your pet has the disease.

Which heartworm preventative do you recommend?
     Our clinic carries several types of preventatives, depending on the needs of your pet.

     For cats, we carry only one brand:  Revolution
     For dogs, we carry HeartGard Plus, Iverhart, and Sentinel

Can I buy heartworm preventative over the counter?
     No.  In Virginia, heartworm preventatives are considered prescription drugs.  Your pet must have an exam and blood test by a veterinarian before starting this medication.  If you find heartworm medications sold at stores or online without a prescription – steer clear!  These can be imported fake medications.  The manufacturers of the legitimate brands will not honor their guarantees if the medications are not purchased from a veterinarian.

********************************************************************************************
Questions?  Use the contact form on this blog or leave a note in the comment section.

Read Full Post »

A single Tapeworm egg packet. Photo by Jennifer Miele.

Of  all the worm eggs we search for under a microscope, the elusive Tapeworm egg is the most difficult to detect.  Not because of its size, mind you – these things are huge compared to other worm eggs.  The problem is, there tend to be so darn few Tapeworm eggs, we rarely see them.  By contrast, a mild Roundworm or Hookworm infestation can result in a slide saturated with eggs.  You are more likely to see Tapeworm segments on your pet’s fur than we are to find eggs in a fecal sample.

In fact, the segments you see on your pet’s fur are called proglottids, and they function as egg sacs. As these pieces detach from the larger worm still inside your pet (yuck), they may start releasing their eggs, which then appear (microscopically speaking) in your pet’s stool. Because of this, you will often see the proglottids before the vet has a chance to check a stool sample and find the eggs.

     Recently, though, we got lucky.  A pet presented with an infestation of Tapeworms, which provided me the opportunity to photograph the egg packet shown above.  Below, you will see something even more rare.

Five Tapeworm eggs as viewed through a microscope. Photo by Jennifer Miele

Okay, I admit it’s pretty silly to get excited over something so gross.  In fact, I hope you’re not eating lunch or dinner as you read this.  After the worming we gave, these little guys won’t be eating lunch or dinner, either.  Meanwhile, we seldom see so many egg packets together in one frame, which is why I consider this slide “rare.”

     The fun didn’t end there, however.  Once the sample had time to float all eggs to the surface, we found a couple of these guys trying to sneak by:

 

Mystery slide. Photo by Jennifer Miele

What’s that?  A little hard to see, compared to the Tapeworm eggs?  This little dude is shown at the same magnification as his giant neighbors.  To make it easy on you, I’ll crop it and show you what we’re looking at.

Hookworm egg. Photo by Jennifer Miele

       It’s a Hookworm egg.  How adorable.  I found only a couple of these eggs on the slide.  All I can figure is that the Tapeworms had a head start and were beating up on the hapless Hookworms that showed up late to dinner.

     Imagine the Worm Wars taking place inside your pet.  Not a pretty picture, is it?  If your pet is not already on a monthly heartworm/intestinal worm preventative medication, now is the time to act.  Have your dog’s blood tested first; it should be free of heartworm disease before starting any of the preventatives.  Cats and dogs should have their stool tested for intestinal worms, as well.  Any adult worm infestations should be treated by the vet.

     Check out our favorite heartworm and intestinal worm preventative medications:

Revolution for Cats……….treats and prevents heartworms, roundworms, hookworms, fleas, ear mites

Iverhart Plus for Dogs……treats and prevents heartworms, roundworms, hookworms

Iverhart Max for Dogs……treats and prevents heartworms, roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms

HeartGard Plus for Dogs……treats and prevents heartworms, roundworms, hookworms

Sentinel for Dogs…….treats and prevents heartworms, roundworms, hookworms, whipworms, fleas

     Questions?  Call Jennifer at 583-2619.  Happy worming!

 

Read Full Post »