Posts Tagged ‘pet toxins’

National Poison Prevention Week is March 17 – 23, 2019 — but we’re getting an early start.

Today’s topic: What you need to know about essential oils and your pets

The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center [ASPCA APCC] warns pet owners to use caution when using essential oils in the home — especially when the oils are highly concentrated – because of the risk of creating or exacerbating health problems in pets.

According to the APCC, “Essential oils have long been used for maladies such as nasal congestion, anxiety, sore muscles and more. And with the popularity of oil diffusers—an easy way to release oils into the air—there is more alarm about how oils may affect animals.”

  • It is best not to give or apply highly concentrated oils to pets.
  • If a pet has an underlying health problem, particularly a respiratory issue, it may be best to avoid use of essential oil diffusers in the household.
  • Do not use an essential oil diffuser in the house if there are birds present. Birds are more likely than other animals to suffer respiratory effects from a diffuser due to their specialized respiratory system.
  • If using a diffuser or warmer make sure they are out of reach of pets and that pets can leave the area if the smell is getting too strong for them.
  • Don’t keep a diffuser in the same room (or use a strong concentration) for animals who groom themselves. Pets that groom themselves include [but are not limited to] dogs, cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, and birds.
  • Pets that have respiratory problems or broken skin, or other health issues, are at higher risk of toxic exposure.

Pets that have been exposed to a toxic level of essential oil may show the following signs, according to ASPCA APCC:

  • ataxia (stumbling, incoordination)
  • muscle weakness
  • depression
  • behavior changes
  • hypothermia (dangerously low body temperature)
  • collapse
  • seizures
  • pneumonia

If you suspect your pet is having a reaction to essential oil exposure, contact an animal poison control center such as ASPCA APCC. Their number is 1-888-426-4435. A $65 fee may be charged to your credit card. Information will be provided to you and, if medical attention is recommended, to the veterinary hospital of your choice.

In the case of suspected poisoning or toxin exposure, we recommend contacting BluePearl at 757-499-5463 for 24/7 emergency veterinary care.

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Did you know the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals [aka, ASPCA] operates a Poison Control Center? It’s true. If your pet ingests something toxic, get advice from trained professionals by calling their 24-hour Hotline at 1-888-426-4435. Have your credit card available, as there is a fee for service.

Recently, the ASPCA Poison Control Center mined its data to discover the Top Ten Animal Toxin calls that it received in 2017, based on 199,000 cases.

Top Ten Animal Toxins of 2017 – Click to enlarge

 

 

 

1. Human prescription medications: 17.5%

2. Over-the-counter medications: 17.4%

3. Food: 10.9%

4. Veterinary products: 8.9%

5. Chocolate: 8.8%

6. Household items: 8.6%

7. Insecticides: 6.7%

8. Rodenticides: 6.3%

9. Plants: 5.4%

10. Garden products: 2.6%

On your next visit to Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, pick up a brochure on 101 household items that can be harmful to your pet!

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     Yesterday, we shared with you a list of cat toxins found in the home.  Today, we present the Top Ten list of toxins for dogs, as compiled by Veterinary Pet Insurance and Pet Poison Helpline.

  1. Chocolate
  2. Insect bait stations
  3. Mouse and rat poison
  4. Fertilizers
  5. Xylitol (sugar substitute) in items such as candy and gum
  6. Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, generics)
  7. Acetaminophen (Tylenol, generics)
  8. Silica gel packs
  9. Amphetamines such as ADD/ADHD drugs
  10. Household cleaners

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     VPI Pet Insurance has compiled a list of the Top Ten toxic items for cats, as reported by Pet Poison HelpLine.  (Look for the Top Ten list for dogs, tomorrow.)

  1. Lilies
  2. Canine permethrin insecticides (flea & tick treatments)
  3. Household cleaners
  4. Mouse and rat poison
  5. Paint and varnish
  6. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
  7. Glow sticks, glow jewelry
  8. Amphetamines, such as ADD/ADHD drugs
  9. Acetaminophen (Tylenol, generics)
  10. Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, generics)

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