Posts Tagged ‘Pet Poison Helpline’

The FDA is warning that cats have been sickened by and died as a result of exposure to topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs). The dangerous ingredient in particular is flurbiprofen, which damages the kidneys.

These topical creams are typically used to treat joint and muscle pain in humans. Exposure to even a small amount of the cream can lead to illness or death in pets. The exposure can occur at the site of application on human skin, or contact with the medicine container or cloth applicator. Dogs and other pets are also considered at risk.

If you believe that your pet has been exposed to topical flurbiprofen, bathe the pet thoroughly and contact the Pet Poison Helpline at l-855-764-7661 ($49 fee)
or
the
ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at 1-888-426-4435 ($65 fee.)

Watch for these signs:

  • lethargy
  • lack of appetite
  • vomiting

Visit the FDA’s page on topical flurbiprofen exposure to learn more.

Lg Caduceus

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     The Pet Poison Helpline has released a list of the Top Ten toxic substances most frequently reported to its service in 2011 (among dogs only.) Along with that list was a breakdown by breed of the dogs involved.

     The 2011 list of common poisonings was strikingly similar to the one released for 2010, so I’ll share the Top Ten list of breeds involved, instead.

  1. Mixed breeds
  2. Labrador retrievers
  3. Golden retrievers
  4. Chihuahuas
  5. Yorkshire terriers
  6. Dachshunds
  7. Shih Tzus
  8. Boxers
  9. Beagles
  10. German shepherds

     So what’s going on here? Are all these dogs predisposed to having what I call “garbage guts”? Perhaps not. Let’s take a look at the American Kennel Club’s list of the Top Ten breeds registered in 2011:

  1. Labrador retrievers
  2. German shepherds
  3. Beagles
  4. Golden retrievers
  5. Yorkshire terriers
  6. Bulldogs
  7. Boxers
  8. Poodles
  9. Dachshunds
  10. Rottweilers

     (Shih Tzus ranked 11th and Chihuahuas ranked 14th.) 

     Hmmm. I sense a correlation between the prevalence of each particular breed in the population versus its likelihood to end up on a list of calamities like the one above. 

     What do you think? Are these really the most danger-prone dogs, or are the results skewed by each breed’s respective popularity?   

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     Whether you’re decking the halls or going into hibernation mode, there are things you can do to protect your pet from holiday hazards.

     Make your home safe for live-in and visiting pets with these tips from Dr. Gail C. Golab.

Frostbite and snow-removal salt:

Snow and salt should be removed from your pet’s paws immediately. 

Frostbitten skin is red or gray and may slough (peel off.)

Apply warm, moist towels to thaw out frostbitten areas slowly until the skin appears flushed.

Contact your veterinarian as soon as possible for further care.

Snow removal products should be stored out of the reach of pets and small children, as the products’ toxicity varies considerably.

 

Toxic plants and holiday/winter products:

     Plants and other items associated with the winter and holiday season can be toxic to your pets.  What follows is a general guide.  Please consult your veterinarian, animal poison control, and the manufacturer for specifics.  Remember, the earlier you seek treatment, the better for your pet!

Plants:

poinsettia leaves and stems

balsam

pine

cedar

fir

holly berries and leaves

mistletoe, especially berries

 

Decorations/chemicals/other:

angel hair (spun glass)

Christmas tree preservatives

snow sprays, snow flock

tree ornaments

super glue

styrofoam

icicles

tinsel

crayons, paints

fireplace colors/salts

plastic model cement

bubbling lights (contain methylene chloride)

snow scenes (may contain salmonella)

aftershave, perfume

alcoholic beverages

chocolate

epoxy adhesives

antifreeze

     Some of the above items are notable not just for their toxicity, but also for the danger they pose of intestinal blockage or severe irritation to the skin and mucous membranes. 

Keep these numbers handy for emergencies –

Pet ICU in Virginia Beach 757-499-5463

Pet Poison Helpline  1-800-213-6680

ASPCA Animal Poison Control  1-888-426-4435

 

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     Veterinary Pet Insurance (VPI) and Pet Poison Helpline have teamed up to create a helpful refrigerator decal warning about drug dangers for pets.

     These are the Top Six categories of human medications that are toxic to pets; examples of the drugs are in parentheses, but are by no means a complete list:

  1. Pain relievers (Advil, Aleve, Motrin, Tylenol)
  2. Antidepressants (Zoloft, Cymbalta, Effexor)
  3. ADD/ADHD medications (Ritalin, Vyvanse)
  4. Sleep aids (Klonopin, Ambien, Lunesta)
  5. Muscle relaxants (Lioresal, Flexeril)
  6. Heart medications (Cartia, Cardizem)
    Decal available at our clinic. Get yours FREE while they last!

    Coming soon:  New Pet Owner packs sponsored
    by Veterinary Pet Insurance

 

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     Every home should have a first aid kit for people. But pet owners should have a second kit for their furry family members. You can put together your own kit (using a watertight container) with these items:

  • Veterinarian’s contact information
  • ER veterinary clinic contact information
  • Scissors
  • Tweezers
  • Gloves
  • Gauze pads
  • Gauze rolls
  • Soft muzzle
  • Alcohol prep pads
  • Cold pack
  • Digital thermometer
  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Rags or rubber tubing
  • Blanket or towel

    VPI (Veterinary Pet Insurance) provides these tips on knowing how to respond in an emergency:

     “Survey, Secure, Stat! While it’s important not to self-diagnose your pet’s symptoms, you must first determine the situation. Next, stabilize your pet, then take him to the veterinarian, who will want to know what happened and when, and if your pet is feeling worse, better or the same since the incident occurred.”

     Note that First Aid does not mean you provide all the medical care at home in a true emergency. However, there are occasions, such as in heat stroke or burns, where some home treatment is necessary to stabilize the pet in order to transport him safely to the hospital. In the case of burns, VPI recommends this procedure:

Survey: Burns
              Your pet’s skin has obvious signs of burns, or he has ingested a toxin and is drooling, pawing at his mouth or swallowing excessively.

Secure:  Restrain your pet. Flush burns with cold water or apply a wash cloth cooled with ice water.

Stat!:  Go to the clinic within the hour, or immediately if electrocution was the source of injury. Bring the [responsible] chemical agent with you, if possible.

     These tips and more are available at our clinic in a brochure by VPI entitled “First Aid for Your Pet.”

Need to Know Now:

Tidewater Animal Emergency and Referral Center…….757-499-5463

Pet Poison Helpline……………………………………………….1-800-213-6680

www.petinsurance.com/healthzone ………….Learn how to take your pet’s temperature and what is considered normal or abnormal temperature range.

Suggested reading:

The First Aid Companion for Dogs and Cats

First Aid for Dogs

Pet First Aid:  Cats and Dogs  

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     Yesterday, we shared with you a list of cat toxins found in the home.  Today, we present the Top Ten list of toxins for dogs, as compiled by Veterinary Pet Insurance and Pet Poison Helpline.

  1. Chocolate
  2. Insect bait stations
  3. Mouse and rat poison
  4. Fertilizers
  5. Xylitol (sugar substitute) in items such as candy and gum
  6. Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, generics)
  7. Acetaminophen (Tylenol, generics)
  8. Silica gel packs
  9. Amphetamines such as ADD/ADHD drugs
  10. Household cleaners

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     VPI Pet Insurance has compiled a list of the Top Ten toxic items for cats, as reported by Pet Poison HelpLine.  (Look for the Top Ten list for dogs, tomorrow.)

  1. Lilies
  2. Canine permethrin insecticides (flea & tick treatments)
  3. Household cleaners
  4. Mouse and rat poison
  5. Paint and varnish
  6. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs
  7. Glow sticks, glow jewelry
  8. Amphetamines, such as ADD/ADHD drugs
  9. Acetaminophen (Tylenol, generics)
  10. Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, generics)

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