Posts Tagged ‘pet poison emergency’

If you or any member of your household is using 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) cream, it is important that the medication is never within reach of your pets.

5-fluorouracil is typically prescribed to treat skin cancers and other skin disorders in people. Its mode of action, which causes cell death, can be fatal to pets that ingest the cream. 

And according to the FDA, a pet may be exposed: 

  • by chewing through the medication packaging (often a tube)
  • when licking their owner who has applied the cream on themselves
  • by coming in contact with 5-FU residue on hands, clothing, carpets, furniture
  • by ingesting residue in cloths or medication applicators
  • when grooming itself after contact with a person who uses 5-FU (more likely in cats).

Time is not on your side:

Within 30 minutes of ingestion, a pet may begin vomiting and exhibiting tremors, ataxia (loss of muscle coordination, trouble walking), and seizures. Death can occur within six hours after exposure.

Treatment may not be available or effective:

Unfortunately, “there is no defined effective treatment for 5-FU toxicosis in dogs and cats,” according to a report in Vetted™ magazine, a professional veterinary publication. Exposure to even a small amount of 5-fluorouracil can be fatal to pets, even with aggressive emergency care.

If you believe your pet has been exposed to any medication intended for humans, immediately contact an animal poison control hotline, such as

ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at 1-888-426-4435*    or

Pet Poison Helpline at 1-855-764-7661*

*A fee will be applied to your credit card.

And be sure you know the location of the nearest pet emergency hospital. In Hampton Roads, we recommend Bay Beach and BluePearl.

Your best bet is prevention:

If you or someone in your household uses 5-fluorouracil [it may also be packaged as Carac, Efudex, or Fluoroplex], take special care to prevent your pet from any contact, no matter how small, with the drug. When discarding spent tubes, applicators, or anything that has contacted the medication, place the trash bag in an area that is inaccessible by your pets. Laundry that may contain traces of the medication should also be placed out of reach.

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Information for this article is condensed from Vetted™, August 2019, Volume 114, Number 8

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Three resources you can use to prevent or respond to
pet poisoning incidents

Thinking about sharing a meal with your pet? VetProtect can tell you which foods are unsafe for your buddy.
Photo credit: Rarnie McCudden via Pexels.

Pet poisoning incidents can happen fast. Your puppy licks antifreeze from the garage floor. Your teenager shares his garlic bread supreme pizza with the cat. Your spouse gives Tylenol to the dog, to alleviate arthritis pain.

In pet poisoning cases, time is of the essence when it comes to treatment. And knowing the right way to begin treatment is essential (for instance, should you make the pet vomit or not?)

The good news is, help is available in several forms. Here are three resources for you to know:

VetProtect – Pet Safety app — This app helps prevent pet poisonings by letting you know whether a particular food item or medication is dangerous for your pet. It can even tell you how much your vet emergency bill might be if someone does give your pet a dangerous food or drug. [Also available in Spanish.]

So you fed your Chihuahua that big bunch of grapes, even though VetProtect told you not to. Now what?

ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC) — The APCC is open 24 hours a day / 365 days a year to help you in a pet poison emergency. Many hospitals will contact a poison control center, such as the APCC, for guidance in treating a poisoning emergency.

Call 1-888-426-4435 for emergency advice that you can take with you to the hospital, and instructions for anything you can do at home to help your pet. Expect to be billed a consultation fee on your credit card (most recently $65, but this amount is subject to change.)*

Pet Poison Helpline (PPH) — PPH is available 24/7 to help with your pet poisoning emergencies. A $59 fee will be billed to your credit card. PPH will work with your pet’s doctor or the emergency vet to coordinate a treatment plan.

Call 1-855-764-7661 for help, any time of day or night.

*Subject to change.

And be sure you know the location of the nearest pet emergency hospital. In Hampton Roads, we recommend BluePearl and Bay Beach.

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Houseplant collections are trending, and pet owners want to add a touch of the outdoors to their interior design. Which plants are considered safe to share space with pets? Renee DiPietro, CVT, has the scoop.

Tip: Portions of the text in italics refer to plants that are not safe for pets — read carefully and research thoroughly before introducing a plant into the household.

Pet Safe Plants: Flora and Fauna Can Coexist!

By Renee DiPietro, CVT, Permitted Wildlife Rehabilitation, Plant Lover
Veterinary Information Specialist

Pet owners worry about keeping houseplants in their homes due to the toxic potential of many plant species. As animal lovers, many of us are drawn to the natural world and to plant life specifically for the many benefits to our home environment that plants can provide. The presence of live greenery in our homes can reduce stress, literally help to clean the air, and provide beauty. All of these attributes can contribute to happiness and quality of life. It is true that many plants do have toxic potential and that it is dangerous to keep them in homes with cats, dogs, birds, or really any pet that has any free range capability around the house. This being said there is also a decent number of plants that can co-inhabit your home without any danger to your animal companions.

Spider Plants:
The spider plant is a common house hold plant that is extremely easy to care for and comes in a few interesting varieties including variegated and curly. These super hardy house plants can grow quite large with minimal care but can also be contained by the size of the pot they are grown in. They are suitable as both hanging and table top plants. They do fine in low light applications or with a little sun. Cats enjoy nibbling on and sometimes outright eating spider plants, so for the plant’s safety, if you have cats you may want to employee the hanging application for keeping this member of the indoor flora family.

True Palms:
There are many varieties of palms that can be safely kept with pets. Some of these varieties include Pony tail, Parlor and Areca palms. If seeking to keep palms in your home, it is essential to make sure that they are the indoor variety and that you avoid anything with the words Sago or Cycad. They Sago palm is a cycad, not a true palm and it is extremely toxic to pets. This plant is meant for outdoor applications, but when purchasing palms for your home it is very important to make sure you are not getting a cycad. True palms do not require much light and with a little investigation into their care can be an easy flora addition to your home.

African Violets: These squat fuzzy little beauties brighten up a home not only with their beautiful dark green leaves but also with their bright flowers that come in many colors and also in single or double formation. African violets pose no risk for toxicity to pets. They are a little more temperamental than some house plants. They like to have their feet wet but their heads dry and to have just the right amount of bright sunlight. With a little research and experimentation you can keep these diminutive cuties happy. They are often grown in small clay pots that are easily knocked over by cats. I use heavier pots or put stones in the bottom of pots to keep them weighted down.

Bamboo: This versatile plant can have many fun applications in your home. It can grow happily in soil or even just in water in decorative vases or fish tanks. Lucky or Curly Bamboo is a popular variety and can be grown woven into intricate designs.

Boston Fern: This beautiful cascading plant can be kept both as a hanging plant or on a table top. It can grow quite large if well cared for. These plants are a challenge to keep, as being naturally a forest plant they require moist soil and higher humidity than is found in many homes. Hats off to those of you who can keep a Boston Fern happy year round. I have yet to achieve this goal but they are such a splendid plant that I intend to keep trying.

Cast Iron Plant: This is not a plant I have ever had the pleasure to keep. Though a member of the lily family, this plant is non-toxic to cats and dogs. The beautiful dark green leaves add a tropical element to the home and this plant is also suitable for outdoor planting in warmer climates. Small purple flowers that can appear at the plant’s base are a hidden gem. This plant is very easy to care for and even tolerant of neglect.

Bromeliads: Speaking of tropical flare, Bromeliads are brightly colored and relatively easy to care for if you pay attention to their needs. Many of them are epiphytes, meaning that they don’t grow in soil but rather attached to a substrate and actually extract water and nutrients from the air. These are very interesting, beautiful, non-toxic house plants and well worth a try.

Christmas Cactus: Another fun and colorful plant, I love Christmas Cactuses and have a few of them. Given their name for their habit of blooming prolifically in early winter they are easy to care for, non-toxic, and when blooming show off cascades of red/orange, violet, pink or white flowers. They can grow quite large but will also live happily with tight roots in a smaller pot. Even though this plant is considered to be non-toxic to pets, ingestion can cause mild GI distress (vomiting, diarrhea). While no systemic toxicity is expected, who wants an upset tummy? Or to have to clean up after an upset tummy? Depending on how sensitive your pet’s GI tract is, some cases of GI distress could require veterinary treatment. If you think your pet is inclined to chew on your Christmas Cacti, it would be best to keep these plants out of reach.

Phaleaenopsis Orchid: Also called the Moth Orchid, this drop dead gorgeous flowering plant is one of my very favorites and several grace my kitchen counters, coffee table and office window sill. They are easy to care for if their bright light and careful watering requirements are provided. They bloom reliably with large cascades of flowers and their blooms can last for months before dropping from the plant. This plant does require some fertilization with orchid specific products. I recommend removing the plant from your cat’s or dog’s reach for a day or two after fertilization to avoid your pet licking the fertilizer. Like the Bromeliad, this plant is an epiphyte and not grown in soil but rather a substrate such as bark.

Succulents: Succulents are all the rage these days for both home and commercial plantings. Some varieties such as Haworthia, Peporomia and Burrow’s tail are non-toxic to pets, but others such as Kalanchoe can be very toxic. If you plan to keep succulents with your pets, I recommend thorough research and identification of the varieties you want to keep before bringing them into your home.

Swedish Ivy: This is a beautiful green cascading plant with lovely round, softly serrated leaves and small bluish-purple flowers. Non-toxic to pets and easy to care for, it makes an ideal house plant. It likes bright indirect light and loamy soil. Make sure you are buying a Swedish Ivy, not another type of Ivy such as Devil’s Ivy (Pothos) which is toxic to pets.

Lipstick Plant: This colorful flowering plant is interesting and easy to care for. Bright red flowers that bloom in winter brighten up cold grey days. It likes short periods of bright light, well aerated soil, and a little boost in humidity to honor its tropical origins.

So, have your fauna and your flora too! A home with pets and plants is a pleasure for many people. There are other non-toxic plant varieties beyond this basic list. Do your research on toxic potential for pets before bringing any new plant into your home. If you have existing plants that your pets have never bothered it is a good idea to go through them, see what you have and ensure they are all non-toxic even if your pets have never touched them. It only takes one toxic exposure to have sick pet. Also take a little time to research the plant’s care requirements to ensure you can keep your new plant friend happy and healthy too. Most of all, enjoy all the wonderful moments that both your pets and your plants bring you.

This article was published by the Pet Poison Helpline and is posted here by permission.

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March 17th – 23rd is National Poison Prevention Week

The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center has created this infographic to help you inspect your house, room by room, to remove dangers from your pet’s reach.

Tip: this same guide can be used to child-proof your home, as well.

 

Double-click to enlarge

Related: Build a First Aid Kit for Pet Poison Emergencies

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If your pet ingests a toxic substance, your first move should be to call the Pet Poison Helpline.

Veterinary experts at the Pet Poison Helpline (PPH) will tell you what to do in the event of a poisoning incident.

But it’s important to be prepared with the tools you’ll need in order to follow instructions given by PPH. In some cases, you will be instructed to take your pet straight to the nearest emergency hospital, without inducing vomiting or feeding anything else to your pet. But in certain cases, you will be instructed to prepare your pet for emergency care.

In that event, you should have the following items on hand, in case they are needed:

  • Hydrogen peroxide 3% (non-expired)
  • Liquid dishwashing detergent (such as Palmolive or Dawn)
  • Rubber gloves
  • Triple antibiotic ointment (such as Dermalone or Neosporin)
  • Vitamin E oil or capsules
  • Diphenhydramine liquid or 25 mg tablets (such as Benadryl), with no other combination ingredients
  • Can of tuna packed in water; chicken broth; or some type of tasty canned pet food
  • Corn syrup

Here’s another tip to keep you from scrambling in an emergency: Program your phone with the numbers of the nearest pet emergency hospital (such as Blue Pearl 757-499-5463) and Pet Poison Helpline (1-855-289-0358).

Est. 1973

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Tips taken from “Preventing Pet Poisoning Emergencies” by Pet Poison Helpline and Veterinary Pet Insurance

Check our blog for more tips on handling pet poisoning emergencies in the coming weeks!

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Veterinary Pet Insurance and Pet Poison Helpline have teamed up to bring you resources and information to help you in a pet poisoning emergency.

Know what to do! If you suspect your pet has ingested a harmful substance, contact a local pet emergency hospital, such as Blue Pearl at 757-499-5463, or call Pet Poison Helpline at 1-855-289-0358 any time, day or night. The Pet Poison Helpline will bill your credit card a one-time, per-incident fee of $39.

Gather the right information! Have this information ready when calling:

  • What your pet ingested and when
  • How much of the substance your pet ingested (how many pills, what milligram strength; how many ounces of chocolate, etc)
  • Pet’s current weight
  • Pet’s medical history, any medications or supplements

Get the app! Purchase a Pet Poison Helpline app at the iTunes App Store for only $1.99, for your iPhone, and get access to information that can help save your pet’s life.

Emergency assistance at your fingertips!

Emergency assistance at your fingertips!

Get the app from the iTunes store.

Get the app from the iTunes store.

 

Coming Thursday: Pack a First Aid Kit for pet poisoning emergencies. We’ll tell you how.

On Facebook: Watch for the Pet Poison Helpline Top Ten lists this week and next.

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