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Posts Tagged ‘pet emergency’

If you want to carry your pet’s records with you on the go, Pawprint has an app that allows you 24/7 access to your pet’s medical information.

When you download the app, Pawprint* contacts your pet’s veterinarian to request records, then uploads them to your account.

Click to enlarge.

Then you’ll be able to set reminders for vaccine boosters, flea and heartworm treatments, even daily walks.

You can add other people to the account, so your go-to pet-sitter can access your pet’s records if you have to go out of town and your pet needs medical care.

You’ll have proof of your pet’s vaccination, as close as your smartphone — which can come in handy at the groomer’s, dog park, or even the veterinary emergency hospital.

If you are a client of Dr. Donald Miele at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, you can request that we share your pet’s records with Pawprint, or any other pet record app of your choice.

*Other similar apps may be available. 

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Note: Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or staff warranty or guarantee the service provided by Pawprint, nor are the above-named responsible for any costs incurred or damage to your electronic device as a result of downloading the app.
Always use discretion when downloading any app to your electronic device. Some software can cause harm to your device; some software incurs a fee for usage. Always research an app before you download, as you assume liability for any damage or costs incurred.

 

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When your pet is treated on an outpatient basis (i.e. sent home after the treatment visit), the doctor will often request a progress report before the next examination visit. Determining the next step in your pet’s treatment will be assisted by your observation of your pet at home.

So what should you report about your sick or injured pet, and why is it important?

Let’s break down the possibilities, following outpatient care for illness or injury.

Here is what to look for:

A. Your pet recovers fully / its condition significantly improves and does not relapse.

*In this case, further treatment may not be needed; however, always check with the doctor.
*Do not assume that treatment has ended and do not stop giving your pet its medications just because it appears to feel better.
*Some drugs need to be tapered off, while others – such as antibiotics – should be given for the entire course, to prevent relapse or resistant microbes.
*In the case of chronic illness [diabetes, renal failure, etc.], treatment is ongoing to provide your pet with the best chance of a happy life and reduced symptoms of illness.

B. Your pet’s condition improves somewhat, but without complete recovery.

*Further diagnostics and treatment may be needed to give your pet the best chance at a full recovery, if possible.

C. Your pet’s condition improves and then deteriorates.

*Further diagnostics and treatment are needed.
*Sometimes, medication provides temporary relief, and then signs return after medication is finished.
*The doctor will need to determine if a different course of treatment is appropriate, or whether the pet has a chronic condition, which would require long-term treatment.

D. Your pet shows no sign of improvement or your pet’s condition worsens.

*Further diagnostics and treatment are needed.
*If your pet shows no improvement with any treatment method, it may be an indication that recovery is not possible and humane euthanasia may be elected.

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It is vital to your pet’s health that you report your observations to the doctor or a staff member. If your pet does not recover or show significant lasting improvement, further steps can be taken, which may include referral to a veterinary hospital or appropriate specialist.
Remember, your pet’s doctor sees your pet for a very limited time in the veterinary clinic and has no information on your pet’s behavior or activity at home — where your pet spends the majority of its time — unless you share that information.
Together, we can work toward improving your pet’s health.

 

Questions about your pet’s condition or treatment regimen? If you are our client, please Contact Us. Otherwise, please contact your pet’s veterinarian, as we are unable to provide advice on cases outside of our clinic.

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Little Creek Veterinary Clinic will be closed
for Spring Break, from April 19th – 23rd.

During our absence, we will be unable to fill
prescriptions or place orders for special foods.

Medical emergencies can be handled by
BluePearl at Town Center. Call 757-499-5463.

Important:
Please place food and medication refill orders this week,
for pickup by Tuesday, April 18th.


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According to the calendar, December 21st is the first day of winter.  According to my frozen fingers, winter is here.  Norfolk, Virginia is expected to experience some seriously cold weather, beginning this week. Do a favor for your dogs and cats, and bring them in at night.

Bonus: How cold is too cold for your pet?
Check out this chart from Petplan!

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Dr. Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends following these tips from Purina to keep your pets safe in cold weather.

Winter Pet Care Tips from Purina  

Winter and the busy holiday can pose special risks for pets.  Help your pet to weather the winter and stay healthy and safe by following these simple tips.

  • Keep indoor pets in a dry, warm area free of drafts.  If possible, elevate your pet’s bed off the floor.
  • Bring pets inside when temperatures dip into the 50s or even the low 60s.  Otherwise, in warmer temperatures, provide outdoor pets a dry, insulated shelter out of the wind.
  • Staying warm requires extra calories, so feed your pet accordingly when the temperature drops.  Talk to your veterinarian for advice on feeding your pet.
  • Cats and kittens often nap on car engines for warmth.  Knock on the hood and honk the horn; then wait a few minutes before starting your car.
  • Pets like the smell and taste of antifreeze, but even a very small amount can kill them.  Thoroughly clean up spills at once.  Tightly close containers and store them where pets cannot get to them.
  • Always have fresh, clean water available for your pet.
  • Alcoholic beverages, holiday treats such as chocolates, and bones from poultry, pork and fish can be harmful or toxic to pets.  Keep your pet on his regular diet.
  • Many plants – including Christmas rose, holly, mistletoe, philodendron, poinsettia, and dieffenbachia – are toxic to pets.  Keep them out of your pet’s reach.
  • Remove ice, salt and caked mud from your pet’s paws and coat at once.  Contact your veterinarian immediately if you suspect your pet has frostbite.  Frostbitten skin may turn reddish, white or gray, and it may be scaly or sloughing.
  • Holiday paraphernalia can be dangerous to pets.  Cover or tack down electrical cords.  Keep tinsel and glass ornaments out of your pet’s reach.  Read warnings on items like spray-on snow.  Never put ribbons around your pet’s neck or allow it to play with plastic or foil wrappings or six-pack beverage holders.

Original post here.

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Chocolate and batteries and raisins — oh my! These common household items, and more, can be hazardous to your pet, especially when they’re in abundance around the holidays, including Halloween.

Know which items are toxic to your pets and how to keep your furbabies safe during the festivals and frolics.

For a more complete list of common household hazards for pets, Contact Us to request a brochure.

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Click to enlarge.

And if the worst should occur, call the Pet Poison Helpline at 1-800-213-6680 and be sure you know which veterinary emergency hospital is closest to your home.

Infographic courtesy of Midwest Veterinary Supply and Pet Poison Helpline.

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Dr. Miele will be out of the office

Wednesday, August 17th.

He will return on Thursday, August 18th.

If your pet needs immediate medical attention,

call Blue Pearl Veterinary Partners at

757-499-5463.

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With daily high temperatures in the 80s and 90s,
it’s time for a reminder on how to prevent deadly heat stroke in pets.

Let your dog chill out this summer!

Let your dog chill out this summer!

For long-time readers of this blog, this post on heat stroke looks familiar. Why? Because I’ve been posting it nearly every year since 2010. Every year, pets suffer heat stroke, but it doesn’t have to be that way. So I’ll keep repeating this column until heat stroke in pets is a thing of the past.

And now, without further ado:

Heat Stroke in Pets

Do you know how to protect your pets from heat stroke during the muggy days of summer?  This goes beyond the usual caveat of “never leave your pet in a car while you go shopping, babysit, attend a sporting event, spy on your ex-boyfriend, etc.  Here are some tips to keep your pet safe in the yard or out and about:

  • Keep pets indoors as much as possible, especially if they are sluggish or panting soon after going outdoors.
  • Limit exercise to brief walks in the coolest parts of the day.  Keep in mind that hot pavement and sand can burn pets’ paws.
  • Provide plenty of cool water.  Check water throughout the day, as it can become hot if left outdoors. 
  • Kennels and pens should have good ventilation and air circulation and should be kept in shaded areas.

Here’s a super-cool idea: Check your dog into Happy Tails Resort
in Norfolk and let her enjoy the indoor swimming pool and play area!

Warning Signs of Heat Stroke or Heat Stress

Your pet may need emergency assistance if it exhibits any of the following signs:

  • Excessive panting and drooling
  • Bright red gums
  • Balance problems
  • Lethargy
  • Staring or anxious expression
  • Labored breathing
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Failure to respond to commands
  • High fever
  • Collapse

What To Do

Lower your pet’s body temperature by easing him into a cool (not freezing) bath.  Water from the outdoor hose may be hot, so that may not be your best option.  

Bring your pet indoors and place him in a tub, taking care to keep his mouth and nose above water [we use stacks of towels to accomplish this.] 

Apply ice packs to his head and neck. 

Call your veterinarian for further instructions.  In most cases, your pet will be hospitalized for treatment and observation.  By necessity, this sort of care may take place at the 24-hour emergency hospital.

Who Is At Risk of Heat Stroke?

Any pet can have heat stroke, but some are more susceptible than others. All pets need to be protected on hot days.  However, these pets are more likely than others to have a problem:

  • Very young and older pets
  • Short-nosed/pug-nosed breeds
  • Overweight pets
  • Pets with cardiovascular or respiratory disorders
  • Pets with a previous history of heat stress

Heat stroke is a life-threatening emergency.  If you suspect your pet has heat stroke, we recommend taking him to the nearest emergency hospital for comprehensive care.

[Information borrowed from “Summer Pet Tips” by Ralston Purina Company and “Summer Safety Tips” by Firstline magazine.]

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This article was originally published on July 28, 2010.

Photo credit: By Leif Skoogfors (This image is from the FEMA Photo Library.) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

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