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Posts Tagged ‘pet emergency’

3 Weird Pet Problems You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

As a pet owner, you do your best to protect your pet from typical known hazards, such as diseases, traffic, heat stroke, and the like…but there are some weird problems pets can come up with that you’ve probably never heard of. For example:

  1. Tick bite paralysis…While not very common, this very real condition occurs when a female tick releases a toxin into a dog while feeding. Signs of tick bite paralysis show up 6-9 days after a tick has attached itself to a dog. The toxin affects the nerves carrying signals between the spinal cord and muscles. [Cats are less frequently affected by this toxin.]
    It is important to find and remove all ticks on the affected dog — and to bring the pet to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for treatment, especially if the pet is having trouble breathing.
    What are the early warning signs of tick-bite paralysis? Read this article to get the full scoop.
  2. Water intoxication…According to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, water intoxication, though rare, usually occurs during the warmer months when pets spend time at the beach or in a pool.
    Signs of water intoxication include nausea, vomiting, lethargy, difficulty breathing, and a swollen belly. In severe cases, the pet may be weak, unable to walk properly (stumbling), have seizures, have an abnormally slow heart rate, exhibit hypothermia (low body temperature), or even go into a coma.
    Pets that are suspected of having water intoxication should be taken to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for life-saving treatment.

    Which pets are most at risk for water intoxication? Read this article to find out.
  3. Toxic vomit…If your pet eats a rodent poison containing zinc phosphide, the chemical can mix with stomach acids and water to create dangerous phosphine gas. If your pet vomits, the gas is released into the air, which can lead to poisoning in people and pets. Phosphine gas can smell like garlic or rotting fish — or it may be odorless.
    If you suspect your pet has ingested rodent poison, call the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (1-888-426-4435) and take your pet to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for treatment.
    Which poisons contain the ingredient zinc phosphide? Read this article to get the list.

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This article is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or suggest a treatment for any disease or disorder. This article is not a substitute for veterinary care or a client-doctor-patient relationship, nor does it constitute such a relationship. Your pet’s veterinarian is the best source of information regarding your pet’s health.

Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff is responsible for outcomes based on information available on this site.

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   As pet owners, the last thing we want to think about is the day we say “good-bye” to our beloved dog or cat. Especially as pets are living longer — sometimes as long as 15 to 20 years — they are more and more becoming a steadfast part of our lives: children grow up with their pets, and older pet owners rely on the familiar company of a dog or cat to keep them company as kids leave the nest.

   Inevitably, the time comes when a pet’s health declines beyond the point where medical intervention is helpful. When that happens, whether suddenly or over a period of time, the pet owner is faced with a heartbreaking decision: how and when to help the pet pass away through euthanasia.

   The “when” decision is typically made with the guidance of a veterinarian, who assists you in evaluating your pet’s quality of life and lets you know when further medical treatment will be futile.

   The “how” decision provides more room for choice, unless the decision to euthanize a pet (i.e., put it to sleep) is being made in an emergency setting.

   Historically, pet owners have relied on the family veterinarian to provide euthanasia services. Clients choose this method because they want to use the veterinarian they trust, in a familiar clinical setting. On the other hand, some pet owners will choose a veterinary clinic they have never been to before, and do not plan to return to after the euthanasia. The reason? They do not wish to return to a place with the unhappy memory of their pet’s last moments, and they also wish to separate those memories from their preferred veterinary clinic.

   A new option has arisen in recent years: in-home euthanasiaThis option works well for the following circumstances:

  • the pet is too large to move, and is incapable of walking on its own;
  • the pet owner wishes to be present for the pet’s final moments;
  • the pet owner would like complete privacy, which is difficult in a hospital;
  • the pet owner would like the pet to be in a comfortable, familiar setting, to ease the pet’s stress and fear;
  • the pet owner would like the option of having their other pets and family members present;
  • the pet owner needs to schedule the euthanasia outside of their veterinarian’s regular work hours;
  • the pet owner would like to determine how much time they can spend with their pet after the procedure.

   In-home euthanasia is a specialty practice offered by several Norfolk veterinarians (and elsewhere in Hampton Roads.) In addition to euthanasia and cremation services, some of these practitioners offer grief support.

Contact Us at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic for a list of the local specialty practices that offer in-home euthanasia, and learn whether this option is right for you and your pet.

 

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As a reminder, Little Creek Veterinary Clinic is closed on Wednesday each week.

If your pet needs immediate medical attention while Dr. Miele is out of the office, please contact BluePearl Emergency Hospital at 757-499-5463.

BluePearl keeps us informed about your pet’s emergency medical care, and helps us keep your pet’s medical records complete.

For non-emergency situations, please Contact Us via internet, email [littlecreekvet@live.com], or phone [757-583-2619 — leave a message.] For those leaving a voice mail message, please be aware that we do not have Caller ID, so it is essential that you slowly and clearly say your preferred contact phone number.

Thank you — and keep in touch!

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When you prevent heartworm disease,
you get to spend less time watching for symptoms
and more time playing, hiking, traveling, and bonding
with your best friend.

Not sure if your pet is on heartworm prevention?
Let Little Creek Veterinary Clinic help you sort through
the pet products you have on hand.*
Contact Us today to get started.

*Offer available only to registered clients of Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

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Did you know the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals [aka, ASPCA] operates a Poison Control Center? It’s true. If your pet ingests something toxic, get advice from trained professionals by calling their 24-hour Hotline at 1-888-426-4435. Have your credit card available, as there is a fee for service.

Recently, the ASPCA Poison Control Center mined its data to discover the Top Ten Animal Toxin calls that it received in 2017, based on 199,000 cases.

Top Ten Animal Toxins of 2017 – Click to enlarge

 

 

 

1. Human prescription medications: 17.5%

2. Over-the-counter medications: 17.4%

3. Food: 10.9%

4. Veterinary products: 8.9%

5. Chocolate: 8.8%

6. Household items: 8.6%

7. Insecticides: 6.7%

8. Rodenticides: 6.3%

9. Plants: 5.4%

10. Garden products: 2.6%

On your next visit to Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, pick up a brochure on 101 household items that can be harmful to your pet!

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Please make note of the following change* to the hours at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic:

Tuesday, February 27th: clinic CLOSED in the morning; re-open at 2 PM

(*Change applies only to the date listed. Unless otherwise noted, our office is closed on Wednesdays.)

If your pet needs immediate medical attention in our absence,
please call 
BluePearl at 757-499-5463.

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We will be taking time off to spend with our family during the Christmas and New Year holidays, and we hope you will take a break, too — whatever you may be celebrating! (For some, it’s the latest Star Wars episode.)

Jolly old St. Nick has our list of days off (and half-day off) at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic:

 

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