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Posts Tagged ‘pet emergency’

Little Creek Veterinary Clinic will be closed
for Spring Break, from April 19th – 23rd.

During our absence, we will be unable to fill
prescriptions or place orders for special foods.

Medical emergencies can be handled by
BluePearl at Town Center. Call 757-499-5463.

Important:
Please place food and medication refill orders this week,
for pickup by Tuesday, April 18th.


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According to the calendar, December 21st is the first day of winter.  According to my frozen fingers, winter is here.  Norfolk, Virginia is expected to experience some seriously cold weather, beginning this week. Do a favor for your dogs and cats, and bring them in at night.

Bonus: How cold is too cold for your pet?
Check out this chart from Petplan!

canine-christmas1

Dr. Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends following these tips from Purina to keep your pets safe in cold weather.

Winter Pet Care Tips from Purina  

Winter and the busy holiday can pose special risks for pets.  Help your pet to weather the winter and stay healthy and safe by following these simple tips.

  • Keep indoor pets in a dry, warm area free of drafts.  If possible, elevate your pet’s bed off the floor.
  • Bring pets inside when temperatures dip into the 50s or even the low 60s.  Otherwise, in warmer temperatures, provide outdoor pets a dry, insulated shelter out of the wind.
  • Staying warm requires extra calories, so feed your pet accordingly when the temperature drops.  Talk to your veterinarian for advice on feeding your pet.
  • Cats and kittens often nap on car engines for warmth.  Knock on the hood and honk the horn; then wait a few minutes before starting your car.
  • Pets like the smell and taste of antifreeze, but even a very small amount can kill them.  Thoroughly clean up spills at once.  Tightly close containers and store them where pets cannot get to them.
  • Always have fresh, clean water available for your pet.
  • Alcoholic beverages, holiday treats such as chocolates, and bones from poultry, pork and fish can be harmful or toxic to pets.  Keep your pet on his regular diet.
  • Many plants – including Christmas rose, holly, mistletoe, philodendron, poinsettia, and dieffenbachia – are toxic to pets.  Keep them out of your pet’s reach.
  • Remove ice, salt and caked mud from your pet’s paws and coat at once.  Contact your veterinarian immediately if you suspect your pet has frostbite.  Frostbitten skin may turn reddish, white or gray, and it may be scaly or sloughing.
  • Holiday paraphernalia can be dangerous to pets.  Cover or tack down electrical cords.  Keep tinsel and glass ornaments out of your pet’s reach.  Read warnings on items like spray-on snow.  Never put ribbons around your pet’s neck or allow it to play with plastic or foil wrappings or six-pack beverage holders.

Original post here.

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Chocolate and batteries and raisins — oh my! These common household items, and more, can be hazardous to your pet, especially when they’re in abundance around the holidays, including Halloween.

Know which items are toxic to your pets and how to keep your furbabies safe during the festivals and frolics.

For a more complete list of common household hazards for pets, Contact Us to request a brochure.

scary-2

Click to enlarge.

And if the worst should occur, call the Pet Poison Helpline at 1-800-213-6680 and be sure you know which veterinary emergency hospital is closest to your home.

Infographic courtesy of Midwest Veterinary Supply and Pet Poison Helpline.

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Dr. Miele will be out of the office

Wednesday, August 17th.

He will return on Thursday, August 18th.

If your pet needs immediate medical attention,

call Blue Pearl Veterinary Partners at

757-499-5463.

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With daily high temperatures in the 80s and 90s,
it’s time for a reminder on how to prevent deadly heat stroke in pets.

Let your dog chill out this summer!

Let your dog chill out this summer!

For long-time readers of this blog, this post on heat stroke looks familiar. Why? Because I’ve been posting it nearly every year since 2010. Every year, pets suffer heat stroke, but it doesn’t have to be that way. So I’ll keep repeating this column until heat stroke in pets is a thing of the past.

And now, without further ado:

Heat Stroke in Pets

Do you know how to protect your pets from heat stroke during the muggy days of summer?  This goes beyond the usual caveat of “never leave your pet in a car while you go shopping, babysit, attend a sporting event, spy on your ex-boyfriend, etc.  Here are some tips to keep your pet safe in the yard or out and about:

  • Keep pets indoors as much as possible, especially if they are sluggish or panting soon after going outdoors.
  • Limit exercise to brief walks in the coolest parts of the day.  Keep in mind that hot pavement and sand can burn pets’ paws.
  • Provide plenty of cool water.  Check water throughout the day, as it can become hot if left outdoors. 
  • Kennels and pens should have good ventilation and air circulation and should be kept in shaded areas.

Here’s a super-cool idea: Check your dog into Happy Tails Resort
in Norfolk and let her enjoy the indoor swimming pool and play area!

Warning Signs of Heat Stroke or Heat Stress

Your pet may need emergency assistance if it exhibits any of the following signs:

  • Excessive panting and drooling
  • Bright red gums
  • Balance problems
  • Lethargy
  • Staring or anxious expression
  • Labored breathing
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Failure to respond to commands
  • High fever
  • Collapse

What To Do

Lower your pet’s body temperature by easing him into a cool (not freezing) bath.  Water from the outdoor hose may be hot, so that may not be your best option.  

Bring your pet indoors and place him in a tub, taking care to keep his mouth and nose above water [we use stacks of towels to accomplish this.] 

Apply ice packs to his head and neck. 

Call your veterinarian for further instructions.  In most cases, your pet will be hospitalized for treatment and observation.  By necessity, this sort of care may take place at the 24-hour emergency hospital.

Who Is At Risk of Heat Stroke?

Any pet can have heat stroke, but some are more susceptible than others. All pets need to be protected on hot days.  However, these pets are more likely than others to have a problem:

  • Very young and older pets
  • Short-nosed/pug-nosed breeds
  • Overweight pets
  • Pets with cardiovascular or respiratory disorders
  • Pets with a previous history of heat stress

Heat stroke is a life-threatening emergency.  If you suspect your pet has heat stroke, we recommend taking him to the nearest emergency hospital for comprehensive care.

[Information borrowed from “Summer Pet Tips” by Ralston Purina Company and “Summer Safety Tips” by Firstline magazine.]

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This article was originally published on July 28, 2010.

Photo credit: By Leif Skoogfors (This image is from the FEMA Photo Library.) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

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national_pet_fire_safety_day

I’ll admit, when I began researching information about National Pet Fire Safety Day, I had a particular idea in mind: finding information that helps pet owners keep their pets safe from fire. What I found was different than I expected.

This article by the American Kennel Club and ADT Security Service suggests the purpose of National Pet Fire Safety Day is to raise awareness of how to prevent pets from starting fires.

Yep. You read that correctly. National Pet Fire Safety Day can be all about preventing fires started by pets.

So how might a pet start a fire? We’ve got a few ideas:

  • Cats love to knock things off tables, desks, counters, and other surfaces. Imagine a cat knocking a burning candle or cigarette onto a rug.
  • Dogs occasionally jump up on stoves to get food. A number dogs have knocked stove knobs into the “on” position beneath pots and pans, which have caught fire.
  • Some pets chew on electrical cords, which can create a fire hazard.
  • A pet can grab the cord of a clothes iron or curling iron and pull it down, igniting material on the floor — or the floor itself.

Do these hazards exist in your home? You may need to pet-fireproof your household.

  • Do not leave burning candles unattended, and keep pets out of rooms where there is an open flame. Consider switching to flameless candles.
  • Some stoves have removable knobs to prevent children and pets from accidentally turning on the stove or oven.
  • Put cord covers over exposed wires and cables, or crate your pet so it cannot chew cords while you’re away.
  • Keep pets out of rooms where heated appliances are used.

National Pet Fire Safety Day is also about protecting your pets from fires in the home:

  • Check smoke detectors in the home at least every 6 months to be sure they are working. Change the batteries at those times, also.
  • Affix an “Animals Inside” cling to windows or doors to alert first responders that pets inside will need rescuing.
  • Keep pets carriers and leashes near the door, for a quick evacuation.
  • Keep identification on your pets in case they escape or are brought to a shelter following a house fire. Consider a HomeAgain microchip — a permanent form of pet identification.

By following these tips on National Pet Fire Safety Day and every day, you and your pets can be safer at home.

Bonus: Order your free “Animals Inside” window cling from the ASPCA —  just click here!

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technical-difficulties

We returned from holiday break to find there is no dial tone at all on our main phone line. [Boo!]

In response to this temporary issue, we’re setting up a new voice mail system that will handle calls for us when we cannot get to the phone.

You can still reach us by dialing 757-583-2619 — that hasn’t changed.

However,

if your pet needs immediate medical attention, please call 757-499-5463.

If you need to chat, but it’s not an emergency, you can also Contact Us through this site.

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