Posts Tagged ‘pet emergency’

Holiday schedule

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If you want to carry your pet’s records while you’re on-the-go, Pawprint has an app that allows you 24/7 access to your pet’s medical information.

When you download the app, Pawprint* contacts your pet’s veterinarian to request records, then uploads them to your account.

Click to enlarge.

Then you’ll be able to set reminders for vaccine boosters, flea and heartworm treatments, even daily walks.

You can add other people to the account, so your go-to pet-sitter can access your pet’s records if you have to go out of town and your pet needs medical care.

You’ll have proof of your pet’s vaccination, as close as your smartphone — which can come in handy at the groomer’s, dog park, or even the veterinary emergency hospital.

If you are a client at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, you can request that we share your pet’s records with Pawprint, or any other pet record app of your choice.

*Other similar apps may be available. 

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Note: Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or staff warranty or guarantee the service provided by Pawprint, nor are the above-named responsible for any costs incurred or damage to your electronic device as a result of downloading the app.
Always use discretion when downloading any app to your electronic device. Some software can cause harm to your device; some software incurs a fee for usage. Always research an app before you download, as you assume liability for any damage or costs incurred.

 

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With daily high temperatures in the 80s and 90s,
it’s time for a reminder on how to prevent deadly heat stroke in pets.

Photo by Pixabay via Pexels

For long-time readers of this blog, this post on heat stroke looks familiar. Why? Because I’ve been posting it nearly every year since 2010. Every year, pets suffer heat stroke, but it doesn’t have to be that way. So I’ll keep repeating this column until heat stroke in pets is a thing of the past.

Heat Stroke in Pets

Do you know how to protect your pets from heat stroke during the muggy days of summer? This goes beyond the usual caveat of “never leave your pet in a car while you go shopping, babysit, attend a sporting event, spy on your ex, etc. Here are some tips to keep your pet safe in the yard or out and about:

  • Keep pets indoors as much as possible, especially if they are sluggish or panting soon after going outdoors.
  • Limit exercise to brief walks in the coolest parts of the day. Keep in mind that hot pavement and sand can burn pets’ paws.
  • Provide plenty of cool water. Check water throughout the day, as it can become hot if left outdoors. 
  • Kennels and pens should have good ventilation and air circulation and should be kept in shaded areas.

Warning Signs of Heat Stroke or Heat Stress

Your pet may need emergency assistance if it exhibits any of the following signs:

  • Excessive panting and drooling
  • Bright red gums
  • Balance problems
  • Lethargy
  • Staring or anxious expression
  • Labored breathing
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Failure to respond to commands
  • High fever
  • Collapse

What To Do

Lower your pet’s body temperature by easing him into a cool (not freezing) bath. Water from the outdoor hose may be hot, so that may not be your best option.  

Bring your pet indoors and place him in a tub, taking care to keep his mouth and nose above water [we use stacks of towels to accomplish this.] 

Apply ice packs to his head and neck. 

Call your veterinarian for further instructions. In most cases, your pet will be hospitalized for treatment and observation. By necessity, this sort of care may take place at a veterinary emergency hospital.

Who Is At Risk of Heat Stroke?

Any pet can have heat stroke, but some are more susceptible than others. All pets need to be protected on hot days. However, these pets are more likely than others to have a problem:

  • Very young and older pets
  • Short-nosed/pug-nosed breeds
  • Overweight pets
  • Pets with cardiovascular or respiratory disorders
  • Pets with a previous history of heat stress

Heat stroke is a life-threatening emergency. If you suspect your pet has heat stroke, we recommend taking him to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for comprehensive care.

[Information borrowed from “Summer Pet Tips” by Ralston Purina Company and “Summer Safety Tips” by Firstline magazine.]

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This article was originally published on July 28, 2010.

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National Poison Prevention Week is March 17 – 23, 2019 — but we’re getting an early start.

Today’s topic: What you need to know about essential oils and your pets

The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center [ASPCA APCC] warns pet owners to use caution when using essential oils in the home — especially when the oils are highly concentrated – because of the risk of creating or exacerbating health problems in pets.

According to the APCC, “Essential oils have long been used for maladies such as nasal congestion, anxiety, sore muscles and more. And with the popularity of oil diffusers—an easy way to release oils into the air—there is more alarm about how oils may affect animals.”

  • It is best not to give or apply highly concentrated oils to pets.
  • If a pet has an underlying health problem, particularly a respiratory issue, it may be best to avoid use of essential oil diffusers in the household.
  • Do not use an essential oil diffuser in the house if there are birds present. Birds are more likely than other animals to suffer respiratory effects from a diffuser due to their specialized respiratory system.
  • If using a diffuser or warmer make sure they are out of reach of pets and that pets can leave the area if the smell is getting too strong for them.
  • Don’t keep a diffuser in the same room (or use a strong concentration) for animals who groom themselves. Pets that groom themselves include [but are not limited to] dogs, cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, and birds.
  • Pets that have respiratory problems or broken skin, or other health issues, are at higher risk of toxic exposure.

Pets that have been exposed to a toxic level of essential oil may show the following signs, according to ASPCA APCC:

  • ataxia (stumbling, incoordination)
  • muscle weakness
  • depression
  • behavior changes
  • hypothermia (dangerously low body temperature)
  • collapse
  • seizures
  • pneumonia

If you suspect your pet is having a reaction to essential oil exposure, contact an animal poison control center such as ASPCA APCC. Their number is 1-888-426-4435. A $65 fee may be charged to your credit card. Information will be provided to you and, if medical attention is recommended, to the veterinary hospital of your choice.

In the case of suspected poisoning or toxin exposure, we recommend contacting BluePearl at 757-499-5463 for 24/7 emergency veterinary care.

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Protect your pet

It’s safe to say that most, if not all, households have a supply of medications on hand, for the human residents of the house. Many of these homes also feature pets — and to a curious dog or cat, your medication could look like a delicious treat.

Dr. Justine Lee, a veterinarian who is board-certified in toxicology [a science dealing with poisons], has 3 recommendations that everyone can follow to reduce the chance that their pet will become a victim of accidental medication poisoning.

  1. If you use pill boxes, put them out of your pet’s reach. Cats and some dogs can climb onto the counter and grab hold of whatever they find there, so remove the temptation.
  2. Hang up backpacks, purses, and briefcases because they often contain basic (but dangerous) items like pills, Tylenol, xylitol gum and candy, coins, and cellphones with batteries.
  3. Ask house guests to keep medications in sturdy containers, out of the pet’s reach. “It’s really easy for dogs to chew into [plastic bags and suitcases],” warns Dr. Lee.

And if you suspect your pet has gotten into your medication? Take action right away by calling the Pet Poison Helpline — there is a fee for service, but the information they provide can help save your pet’s life.

Pet Poison Helpline 
Call 1-855-764-7661
Open 24/7
$59 incident fee applies 

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It’s that time of year! Please be sure you have enough prescription foods and medications on hand to last your pets through the holidays.

Otherwise, Contact Us now to place a refill order. Some medications and food may not be available without adequate notice, so call now.

For the weeks of Christmas and New Year’s, Little Creek Veterinary Clinic will be open regular business hours on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday.

 

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More brands have been added to the administration’s list of pet foods containing dangerous amounts of vitamin D

December 6, 2018

Veterinary Practice News

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is adding another recall to its initial two, following an investigation that found elevated levels of vitamin D in a number of goods.

According to the FDA, this is a developing situation and additional recalls may be announced.

[Read the FDA’s statement here — including instructions for pet owners.]

New reports indicate the goods come from a manufacturer that makes products marketed under several different brand names.

The administration’s scientists are currently analyzing all information available to determine whether the illnesses are definitively connected to diet. Samples of some of the products were evaluated and test results indicated the food contained as much as approximately 70 times the intended amount of vitamin D.

Consuming food with high levels of vitamin D is potentially toxic to dogs, and in severe cases may lead to kidney failure and/or death. It can also cause vomiting, loss of appetite, increased thirst, increased urination, excessive drooling, and weight loss.

[Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends checking your pantry for these foods that the FDA has identified:]

  • Nutrisca Chicken and Chickpea Dry Dog Food (4 lb., 15 lb., and 28 lb.)
  • Natural Life Pet Products Chicken and Potato Dry Dog Food (17.5 lb.)
  • Evolve Chicken and Rice Puppy Dry Dog Food (14 lb. and 28 lb.)
  • Sportsman’s Pride Large Breed Puppy Dry Dog Food (40 lb.)
  • Triumph Chicken and Rice Recipe Dry Dog Food (3.5 lb., 16 lb., and 30 lb.)
  • ANF Lamb and Rice Dry Dog Food (3 kg and 7.5 kg)
  • Lidl Orlando Grain-Free Chicken and Chickpea Superfood Recipe Dog Food
    (#215662)
  • Kroger Abound Chicken and Brown Rice Recipe Dog Food (4 lb., 14 lb., and 24 lb.)
  • ELM Chicken and Chickpea Recipe (3 lb. and 28 lb.)
  • ELM K9 Naturals Chicken Recipe (40 lb.)
  • Nature’s Promise Chicken and Brown Rice Dog Food (4 lb., 14 lb., and 28 lb.)
  • Nature’s Place Real Country Chicken and Brown Rice Dog Food (5 lb. and 15 lb.)

If you have any of the affected foods, call the manufacturer’s phone number (listed on the packaging) and ask for instructions.

If you pet is experiencing signs of illness as mentioned above, contact your veterinarian or veterinary emergency hospital.

This blog post condensed from an article published by Veterinary Practice News.

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