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Posts Tagged ‘pet emergency’

At Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, we’re offering Trupanion’s FREE 30-day pet insurance certificate to benefit new dogs and cats between 8 weeks and 14 years old.

The catch is, you must activate the certificate within 24 hours of your pet’s examination at our clinic to get the free 30-day coverage. But don’t worry — Trupanion is available to you 24 hours a day / 7 days a week. So, even if you see us on a Saturday, you can activate your certificate on a Sunday.

Pets are always surprising their owners with their antics — unfortunately, some of those tricks can lead to a hospital stay. When that happens, you’ll be glad your pet was covered with veterinary pet insurance.

Trupanion’s 30-day pet insurance trial period lets you check out their service and even compare them to other pet insurance companies — all while acting as a safety-net as you shop for coverage during the trial period.

Want more benefits? How about:

  • No caps
  • No limits
  • No penalties for filing claims
  • No waiting periods (waived during trial period only)

[*Some restrictions apply. Available for pets between 8 weeks and 14 years of age. Certificate must be activated within 24 hours of the veterinary visit. Pre-existing conditions are exempt from coverage. Trial period lasts 30 days; coverage will be discontinued at that time unless pet owner arranges regular paid coverage. $250 deductible will apply to eligible claims filed during 30-day trial period. Complete details, including coverage & restrictions, available at www.Trupanion.com.]

We’ll do our best to offer the Trupanion certificate for all new patients, but feel free to ask us about it, too!

Questions? Contact Us today!

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This blog post is presented for informational purposes only, and is not an attempt to engage in commerce. Neither Dr. Miele, nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its employees is responsible for any conflicts arising from the client relying on information contained in this article.
Although every effort has been made to ensure that the information presented here is accurate at the time of publishing, clients are urged to review all details made available by Trupanion before entering into any agreement.
The purchaser of veterinary pet insurance is responsible for verifying all pertinent information and is solely responsible for all costs associated with purchasing and using veterinary pet insurance.

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Looks like we tempted fate by blogging about making a Disaster Plan, back on September 4th.

Although the track of Hurricane Florence remains somewhat uncertain, she is now predicted to move just south of Virginia, which would deliver us only a glancing blow.

However, hurricanes are notorious for doing the unexpected. Remember Hurricane Matthew?

With that in mind, and with the potential for hazardous driving conditions around the region on Thursday and Friday, we have elected to cancel office hours at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic on those days. Depending upon property damage and flooding after the storm, we will likely be closed Saturday, as well.

Dr. Miele will be in the office Wednesday morning, September 12th, to provide wellness care. Patients needing diagnostics or extended treatment will be referred to an appropriate hospital.

BluePearl Veterinary Partners in Town Center will be open during the storm. If your pet has an emergency, call 757-499-5463.

 

Bonus content: What will happen to the animals at the zoo?
Find out here.

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We’ve talked about Disaster Planning before, since coastal Virginia is known for taking hits from tropical storms, minor [so far!] hurricanes, and Nor’easters. But with flood zones appearing to grow and deepen, more residents may be forced to evacuate their homes when severe weather is on the way.

[Virginians, find your storm surge flood map here.]

Disaster planning can also help in an emergency — evacuation due to a fire, for instance — so it is recommended year-round, according to Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian.

Nationwide Pet Insurance has produced this infographic to help you remember the important things when making your plan.

Disaster Plan

Click to enlarge

Contact Us to reserve your copy of this Disaster Preparedness guide ($2 per booklet):

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3 Weird Pet Problems You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

As a pet owner, you do your best to protect your pet from typical known hazards, such as diseases, traffic, heat stroke, and the like…but there are some weird problems pets can come up with that you’ve probably never heard of. For example:

  1. Tick bite paralysis…While not very common, this very real condition occurs when a female tick releases a toxin into a dog while feeding. Signs of tick bite paralysis show up 6-9 days after a tick has attached itself to a dog. The toxin affects the nerves carrying signals between the spinal cord and muscles. [Cats are less frequently affected by this toxin.]
    It is important to find and remove all ticks on the affected dog — and to bring the pet to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for treatment, especially if the pet is having trouble breathing.
    What are the early warning signs of tick-bite paralysis? Read this article to get the full scoop.
  2. Water intoxication…According to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, water intoxication, though rare, usually occurs during the warmer months when pets spend time at the beach or in a pool.
    Signs of water intoxication include nausea, vomiting, lethargy, difficulty breathing, and a swollen belly. In severe cases, the pet may be weak, unable to walk properly (stumbling), have seizures, have an abnormally slow heart rate, exhibit hypothermia (low body temperature), or even go into a coma.
    Pets that are suspected of having water intoxication should be taken to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for life-saving treatment.

    Which pets are most at risk for water intoxication? Read this article to find out.
  3. Toxic vomit…If your pet eats a rodent poison containing zinc phosphide, the chemical can mix with stomach acids and water to create dangerous phosphine gas. If your pet vomits, the gas is released into the air, which can lead to poisoning in people and pets. Phosphine gas can smell like garlic or rotting fish — or it may be odorless.
    If you suspect your pet has ingested rodent poison, call the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (1-888-426-4435) and take your pet to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for treatment.
    Which poisons contain the ingredient zinc phosphide? Read this article to get the list.

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This article is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or suggest a treatment for any disease or disorder. This article is not a substitute for veterinary care or a client-doctor-patient relationship, nor does it constitute such a relationship. Your pet’s veterinarian is the best source of information regarding your pet’s health.

Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff is responsible for outcomes based on information available on this site.

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   As pet owners, the last thing we want to think about is the day we say “good-bye” to our beloved dog or cat. Especially as pets are living longer — sometimes as long as 15 to 20 years — they are more and more becoming a steadfast part of our lives: children grow up with their pets, and older pet owners rely on the familiar company of a dog or cat to keep them company as kids leave the nest.

   Inevitably, the time comes when a pet’s health declines beyond the point where medical intervention is helpful. When that happens, whether suddenly or over a period of time, the pet owner is faced with a heartbreaking decision: how and when to help the pet pass away through euthanasia.

   The “when” decision is typically made with the guidance of a veterinarian, who assists you in evaluating your pet’s quality of life and lets you know when further medical treatment will be futile.

   The “how” decision provides more room for choice, unless the decision to euthanize a pet (i.e., put it to sleep) is being made in an emergency setting.

   Historically, pet owners have relied on the family veterinarian to provide euthanasia services. Clients choose this method because they want to use the veterinarian they trust, in a familiar clinical setting. On the other hand, some pet owners will choose a veterinary clinic they have never been to before, and do not plan to return to after the euthanasia. The reason? They do not wish to return to a place with the unhappy memory of their pet’s last moments, and they also wish to separate those memories from their preferred veterinary clinic.

   A new option has arisen in recent years: in-home euthanasiaThis option works well for the following circumstances:

  • the pet is too large to move, and is incapable of walking on its own;
  • the pet owner wishes to be present for the pet’s final moments;
  • the pet owner would like complete privacy, which is difficult in a hospital;
  • the pet owner would like the pet to be in a comfortable, familiar setting, to ease the pet’s stress and fear;
  • the pet owner would like the option of having their other pets and family members present;
  • the pet owner needs to schedule the euthanasia outside of their veterinarian’s regular work hours;
  • the pet owner would like to determine how much time they can spend with their pet after the procedure.

   In-home euthanasia is a specialty practice offered by several Norfolk veterinarians (and elsewhere in Hampton Roads.) In addition to euthanasia and cremation services, some of these practitioners offer grief support.

Contact Us at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic for a list of the local specialty practices that offer in-home euthanasia, and learn whether this option is right for you and your pet.

 

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As a reminder, Little Creek Veterinary Clinic is closed on Wednesday each week.

If your pet needs immediate medical attention while Dr. Miele is out of the office, please contact BluePearl Emergency Hospital at 757-499-5463.

BluePearl keeps us informed about your pet’s emergency medical care, and helps us keep your pet’s medical records complete.

For non-emergency situations, please Contact Us via internet, email [littlecreekvet@live.com], or phone [757-583-2619 — leave a message.] For those leaving a voice mail message, please be aware that we do not have Caller ID, so it is essential that you slowly and clearly say your preferred contact phone number.

Thank you — and keep in touch!

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When you prevent heartworm disease,
you get to spend less time watching for symptoms
and more time playing, hiking, traveling, and bonding
with your best friend.

Not sure if your pet is on heartworm prevention?
Let Little Creek Veterinary Clinic help you sort through
the pet products you have on hand.*
Contact Us today to get started.

*Offer available only to registered clients of Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

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