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Posts Tagged ‘pet emergencies’

Veterinary Wellness Exams Lower Overall Pet Costs According to Nationwide Data

One of the costliest aspects of being a pet owner is providing proper veterinary care when medical issues arise. A great way to take a bite out of veterinary expenses without shortchanging your pet’s health is to provide preventive care with annual comprehensive wellness examinations. To show the potential savings that wellness care can provide, Nationwide, the nation’s first and largest provider of pet health insurance, recently sorted through its database of more than 600,000 insured pets to determine cost savings associated with the most common preventive dog and cat conditions. Following is a cost analysis of the five most common ailments that can be avoided through preventive veterinary care:

Dental Diseases:

Examples: Tooth infection or cavity; periodontal disease.

Average cost per pet to treat: $391

Average cost per pet to prevent: $180

Prevention tips: Routine dental care, such as brushing your pet’s teeth, can result in improved overall health. The most effective preventive treatment for dental disease is having your pet’s teeth cleaned by a veterinary professional. This annual cleaning will remove plaque buildup and tartar before it leads to more serious oral issues, such as tooth decay and periodontal disease. It’s recommended that pets have their teeth checked by a veterinarian every six to 12 months.

 

External Parasites:

Examples: Lyme disease transmitted by ticks; and allergic dermatitis caused by fleas.

Average cost per pet to treat: $244

Average cost per pet to prevent: $121

Prevention tips: Use preventive flea and tick medications as recommended by your veterinarian. Keep your pet and home environment free of fleas and ticks. Thoroughly check your pets after outdoor activities and contact your veterinarian if fleas and ticks are spotted.

 

Internal Parasites:

Examples: Heartworms, roundworms, tapeworms and Giardia.

Average cost per pet to treat: $207

Average cost per pet to prevent: $35

Prevention tips: Annual fecal exams and preventive medications, can greatly reduce the chance of a parasitic infestation. Keep your pet and your home environment free of fleas. Clean up your pet’s feces immediately, and eliminate exposure to the feces of other animals when your pet ventures outside your home. 

 

Infectious Diseases:

Examples: Parvovirus, Lyme disease and feline leukemia virus.

Average cost per pet to treat: $841

Average cost per dog to prevent using core vaccines: $94

Average cost per cat to prevent using core vaccines: $81

Prevention tips: Vaccination is the most effective way to prevent contraction of common canine and feline infectious diseases. A vaccination protocol recommended by your veterinarian may include additional vaccines based on your pet’s exposure risk (e.g. outside cat, area with high prevalence of ticks, etc.). 

 

Reproductive Organ Diseases:

Examples: Pyometra (infection of uterus), prostatitis (infection or inflammation of prostate gland) and ovarian neoplasia.

Average cost per pet to treat: $609

Average cost per pet to prevent: $323

Prevention tips: Spay (removal of the ovaries and uterus of a female pet) or neuter (removal of the testicles of a male pet) your pet, as recommended by your veterinarian.

 

Respiratory Infections:

Examples: Tracheobronchitis or kennel cough; feline upper respiratory virus

Average cost per pet to treat: $190

Average cost per dog to prevent: $24

Average cost per cat to prevent: $21

Prevention tips: The Bordatella vaccination as recommended by your veterinarian.

“Seeking a veterinarian’s recommendation for wellness care not only saves pet owners money, but also helps prevent our pets from unnecessary, painful ailments,” said Carol McConnell, DVM, MBA, vice president and Chief Veterinary Officer for Nationwide. “The cornerstone of good veterinary care has always been catching diseases early. I strongly recommend that pet owners schedule routine wellness examinations with their local veterinarian. Being proactive is in your pet’s best interest.”

Nationwide’s newest and most popular pet health insurance plan, Whole Pet with Wellness®, is the only pet insurance plan in the United States that includes wellness care in its base plan, with coverage for procedures such as spay/neuter, vaccinations, dental cleanings, flea/tick medications, heartworm medication and prescription pet food.*

*Whole Pet with Wellness will cover 90% of eligible veterinary expenses after the annual deductible is met. To learn more about pet health insurance plans and coverage, go to www.petinsurance.com

About Nationwide pet insurance

With more than 600,000 insured pets, pet insurance from Nationwide is the first and largest pet health insurance provider in the United States. Since 1982, Nationwide has helped provide pet owners with peace of mind and is committed to being the trusted choice of America’s pet lovers.

Nationwide plans cover dogs, cats, birds and exotic pets for multiple medical problems and conditions relating to accidents, illnesses and injuries. Medical plans are available in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Insurance plans are offered and administered by Veterinary Pet Insurance Company in California and DVM Insurance Agency in all other states. Underwritten by Veterinary Pet Insurance Company (CA), Brea, CA, an A.M. Best A+ rated company (2016); National Casualty Company (all other states), Columbus, OH, an A.M. Best A+ rated company (2016). Pet owners can find Nationwide pet insurance on Facebook or follow on Twitter. For more information about Nationwide pet insurance, call 800-USA-PETS (800-872-7387) or visit petinsurance.com.

 

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Christmas Wishes

 

Please make a note of the following dates:

CLOSED Wednesday, December 24 through Friday, December 26

CLOSED Wednesday afternoon, December 31 through Thursday, January 1

Pet emergencies over the holidays can be handled by BluePearl
at 364 S. Independence Blvd. in Virginia Beach, (757) 499-5463.

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http://clipart.christiansunite.com

WINTER PET CARE TIPS FROM PURINA

Winter and the busy holiday season can pose special risks for pets.  Help your pet to weather the winter and stay healthy and safe by following these simple tips.

  • Keep indoor pets in a dry, warm area free of drafts.  If possible, elevate your pet’s bed off the floor.
  • Bring pets inside when temperatures dip into the 50s or even the low 60s.  Otherwise, in warmer temperatures, provide outdoor pets a dry, insulated shelter out of the wind.
  • Staying warm requires extra calories, so feed your pet accordingly when the temperature drops.  Talk to your veterinarian for advice on feeding your pet.
  • Cats and kittens often nap on car engines for warmth.  Knock on the hood and honk the horn; then wait a few minutes before starting your car.
  • Pets like the smell and taste of antifreeze, but even a very small amount can kill them.  Thoroughly clean up spills at once.  Tightly close containers and store them where pets cannot get to them.
  • Always have fresh, clean water available for your pet.
  • Alcoholic beverages, holiday treats such as chocolates, and bones from poultry, pork and fish can be harmful or toxic to pets.  Keep your pet on his regular diet.
  • Many plants – including Christmas rose, holly, mistletoe, philodendron, poinsettia, and dieffenbachia – are toxic to pets.  Keep them out of your pet’s reach.
  • Remove ice, salt and caked mud from your pet’s paws and coat at once.  Contact your veterinarian immediately if you suspect your pet has frostbite.  Frostbitten skin may turn reddish, white or gray, and it may be scaly or sloughing.
  • Holiday paraphernalia can be dangerous to pets.  Cover or tack down electrical cords.  Keep tinsel and glass ornaments out of your pet’s reach.  Read warnings on items like spray-on snow.  Never put ribbons around your pet’s neck or allow it to play with plastic or foil wrappings or six-pack beverage holders.

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Originally posted on December 15, 2010.
Clipart from Christians Unite.

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     Whether you’re decking the halls or going into hibernation mode, there are things you can do to protect your pet from holiday hazards.

     Make your home safe for live-in and visiting pets with these tips from Dr. Gail C. Golab.
Free-Christmas-Picture-Boy-Dog-GraphicsFairy

Frostbite and snow-removal salt:

Snow and salt should be removed from your pet’s paws immediately. 

Frostbitten skin is red or gray and may slough (peel off.)

Apply warm, moist towels to thaw out frostbitten areas slowly until the skin appears flushed.

Contact your veterinarian as soon as possible for further care.

Snow removal products should be stored out of the reach of pets and small children, as the products’ toxicity varies considerably.

 

Toxic plants and holiday/winter products:

     Plants and other items associated with the winter and holiday season can be toxic to your pets.  What follows is a general guide.  Please consult your veterinarian, animal poison control, and the manufacturer for specifics.  Remember, the earlier you seek treatment, the better for your pet!

Plants:

poinsettia leaves and stems

balsam

pine

cedar

fir

holly berries and leaves

mistletoe, especially berries 

Decorations/chemicals/other:

angel hair (spun glass)

Christmas tree preservatives

snow sprays, snow flock

tree ornaments

super glue

styrofoam

icicles

tinsel

crayons, paints

fireplace colors/salts

plastic model cement

bubbling lights (contain methylene chloride)

snow scenes (may contain salmonella)

aftershave, perfume

alcoholic beverages

chocolate

epoxy adhesives

antifreeze

     Some of the above items are notable not just for their toxicity, but also for the danger they pose of intestinal blockage or severe irritation to the skin and mucous membranes. 

Keep these numbers handy for emergencies –

BluePearl Veterinary Emergency Hospital in Virginia Beach 757-499-5463

Pet Poison Helpline  1-800-213-6680

ASPCA Animal Poison Control  1-888-426-4435
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Image from The Graphics Fairy.
This article was originally posted on December 9, 2011.

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Whether you’re decking the halls or going into hibernation mode, there are things you can do to protect your pet from holiday hazards.

Make your home safe for live-in and visiting pets with these tips from Dr. Gail C. Golab.

Frostbite and snow-removal salt:

Snow and salt should be removed from your pet’s paws immediately. 

Frostbitten skin is red or gray and may slough (peel off.)

Apply warm, moist towels to thaw out frostbitten areas slowly until the skin appears flushed.

Contact your veterinarian as soon as possible for further care.

Snow removal products should be stored out of the reach of pets and small children, as the products’ toxicity varies considerably.

Toxic plants and holiday/winter products:

     Plants and other items associated with the winter and holiday season can be toxic to your pets.  What follows is a general guide.  Please consult your veterinarian, animal poison control, and the manufacturer for specifics.  Remember, the earlier you seek treatment, the better for your pet!

Plants:

poinsettia leaves and stems

balsam

pine

cedar

fir

holly berries and leaves

mistletoe, especially berries

 

Decorations/chemicals/other:

angel hair (spun glass)

Christmas tree preservatives

snow sprays, snow flock

tree ornaments

super glue

styrofoam

icicles

tinsel

crayons, paints

fireplace colors/salts

plastic model cement

bubbling lights (contain methylene chloride)

snow scenes (may contain salmonella)

aftershave, perfume

alcoholic beverages

chocolate

epoxy adhesives

antifreeze

Some of the above items are notable not just for their toxicity, but also for the danger they pose of intestinal blockage or severe irritation to the skin and mucous membranes. 

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Just in – ASPCA Animal Poison Control magnets.

ASPCA magnet

Place this reminder on your refrigerator, so you and your holiday guests will know which foods are harmful to your pets. Get one on your next visit to our clinic!

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Keep these numbers handy for emergencies –

Blue Pearl Emergency in Virginia Beach 757-499-5463

Pet Poison Helpline  1-800-213-6680

ASPCA Animal Poison Control  1-888-426-4435

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This post was originally published on December 9, 2011.

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VPI Pet Insurance Offers Dog Park Safety Tips for Your Canine Companion

Brea, Calif. (May 2, 2012) – As summer approaches and the weather heats up, pet owners are more likely to frequent dog parks for a fun outdoor escape where their furry four-legged friends can play and socialize. In fact, more pet owners are utilizing dog parks than ever before. With a 34% increase over the past five years, dog parks are the fastest-growing segment of city parks in the U.S., according to a study by the non-profit Trust for Public Land. As dog park visits increase, Veterinary Pet Insurance Co. (VPI), the nation’s oldest and largest provider of pet health insurance, reminds dog owners about the importance of safety when visiting their favorite dog park. In 2011, VPI policyholders spent more than $8.6 million on medical conditions that are commonly associated with a visit to the dog park. VPI recently sorted its database of more than 420,000 canines to determine common dog park-related medical conditions in 2011. Below are the results:

 Common Dog Park-Related Medical Conditions

  • Sprains and Soft Tissue Injuries
  • Lacerations and Bite Wounds
  • Kennel Cough/Upper Respiratory Infection
  • Insect Bites
  • Head Trauma
  • Hyperthermia or Heat Stroke
  • Parasites
  • Parvovirus

Each of the conditions listed above can make for a costly trip to the dog park for pet parents. The most expensive medical condition on the list, hyperthermia or heat stroke, cost an average of $584 per pet, while insect bites, the least expensive condition on the list, cost an average of $141 per pet. The most common condition on the list, sprains and soft tissue injuries, cost an average of $213 per pet.

“Pets are treated by veterinarians more frequently during the summer months due to their increased exposure to the outdoors,” said Carol McConnell, DVM, MBA, vice president and chief veterinary medical officer for VPI. “The majority of medical conditions that occur at a dog park can be avoided by taking necessary precautions, most notably by keeping a close eye on your dog at all times.”

Before visiting, it is essential for pet owners to understand that dog parks have their rules, just like any other community. Below are a few simple, but important tips for ensuring a fun and safe trip to the dog park:

    • Obey all posted rules and regulations
    • Pay attention to your dog at all times
    • Don’t bring a puppy younger than four months old
    • Make sure your dog is up to date on vaccinations and has a valid license
    • Keep a collar on your dog
    • On very warm days, avoid the dog park during peak temperature hours, typically between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.
    • Look for signs of overheating; including profuse and rapid panting, a bright red tongue, thick drooling saliva and lack of coordination. If this occurs, take your dog to a veterinarian immediately

 

About Veterinary Pet Insurance

With more than 485,000 pets insured nationwide, Veterinary Pet Insurance Co./DVM Insurance Agency is the No. 1 veterinarian-recommended pet health insurance company and is a member of the Nationwide Insurance family of companies. Providing pet owners with peace of mind since 1982, the company is committed to being the trusted choice of America’s pet lovers and an advocate of pet health education. VPI Pet Insurance plans cover dogs, cats, birds and exotic pets for multiple medical problems and conditions relating to accidents, illnesses and injuries. Optional CareGuard® coverage is available for routine care.

Medical plans are available in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. More than 2,700 companies nationwide offer VPI Pet Insurance as a voluntary employee benefit. Policies are underwritten by Veterinary Pet Insurance Company in California and in all other states by National Casualty Company, an A+15 rated company in Madison, Wis. Pet owners can find VPI Pet Insurance on Facebook or follow @VPI on Twitter. For more information about VPI Pet Insurance, call 800-USA-PETS (800-872-7387) or visit petinsurance.com.

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DID YOU KNOW?
According to the Trust for Public Land, Norfolk, Virginia, is ranked #2 out of the top ten cities for dog parks. (Virginia Beach is ranked #54 on the complete list.)
Read more about it here.

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     Veterinary Pet Insurance has released a list of its most unusual ingestion claims from 2011. Here are five of the strangest items on the list:

  1. package of fluorescent light bulbs
  2. cholla cactus
  3. deer antlers
  4. tent stake
  5. dead porcupine

     Want to see the other freaky items removed from pets’ innards? The complete list can be found at VPI’s Hambone Awards.

     Granted, most of us don’t have a dead porcupine or a set of deer antlers scattered about the house, where the dog can help itself to a buffet. But we do have plenty of household objects that can be just as dangerous, warns the ASPCA.

     Here are five to watch out for:

  1. batteries
  2. rubber bands
  3. plastic wrap
  4. nylons
  5. cotton swabs

     Visit our clinic and pick up a copy of the ASPCA’s pamphlet “101 Things You Didn’t Know Could Harm Your Pet.” Or I can mail it to you. Just ask!      ~~  Jen

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