Posts Tagged ‘parasites’

When the air warms up, dogs and their people head to the dog park for exercise and socializing. Let’s keep it fun for everyone!

Here are seven steps you can take to help your pet have a safe, happy season at the dog park:

  1. Keep your dog current on its vaccinations. Bacterial and viral diseases can be spread through direct contact with other dogs; through contact with contaminated objects; and through contact with other dogs’ feces.
  2. Protect your pet against fleas, ticks, and heartworms with easy-to-give monthly preventatives. Just because another dog brings fleas to the park, that doesn’t mean your dog has to bring them home!
  3. Get your pet’s stool tested for intestinal parasites several extra times a year. Monthly preventatives protect against many kinds of intestinal parasites, but no single product provides complete protection against everything out there.
  4. Know how to recognize signs of aggression — whether in your dog or another — and be sure to remove your pet before things get dangerous. Check out these body language cues that warn of impending trouble: https://littlecreekvet.com/2014/05/20/dog-bite-prevention-2014/
  5. Train your pet to respond to your commands, such as Come, Sit, Stay, and Leave It. Knowing these basic commands can help your pet get out of a danger zone when you call him.
  6. Check the posted dog park rules. Some parks segregate dogs by size or have other rules. These rules are for the safety of all dogs using the park — including your own.
  7. If your dog is fearful and does not wish to socialize, don’t force it. She may be happiest just hanging out with you — and that’s perfectly fine!

BONUS — Learn more about dog park safety on Little Creek Veterinary Clinic’s blog: https://littlecreekvet.com/2016/06/28/dog-park-mishaps/

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A quick review of our blog traffic stats revealed what we at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic believe is our most popular blog post of all time. Since folks love it so much, we won’t make you search for it — instead, we’ll present it once again.

Sesame seed or Tapeworm segment?

Since we’re always telling people that dried-up Tapeworm segments (proglottids) look like sesame seeds, we thought we would show the actual comparison.

Photo A:

Sesame seeds or Tapeworm segments?

Sesame seeds or Tapeworm segments? Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

 

 

Photo B:

Sesame seeds or Tapeworm segments?

Sesame seeds or Tapeworm segments? Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

 

 

Photo C:

Sesame seeds on the left; Tapeworm segments (proglottids) on the right. Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Sesame seeds on the left; Tapeworm segments (proglottids) on the right.
Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

 

So if you see a collection of these little doodads around where your dog or cat has been sitting, call the vet, because your pet has Tapeworms.

No, Fluffy did not get into the hamburger buns. Those are Tapeworm segments.

No, Fluffy did not get into the hamburger buns. Those are Tapeworm segments.

 

This post originally appeared on October 28, 2014.

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*In our opinion.

Do you like to win awards, be recognized for your achievements, and get jealous glances from your friends and family? Do you wish your pet could experience the grandiosity of winning a MAJOR AWARD? Then Little Creek Veterinary Clinic has just the thing for you!

Behold: The Clean As A Whistle Award, granted to dogs and cats whose stool samples are determined by microscopic examination to be free of parasites, parasite eggs, blood, and foreign objects.

Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends that all dogs and cats living in the Hampton Roads area have their stool examined at least twice a year.

Here is a list of parasites or their eggs that we may find on microscopic examination of the stool, which  cannot be seen with the naked eye: Coccidiae, whipworms, hookworms, mange mites. And although you may see adult Tapeworm segments and Roundworms in your pet’s stool, it is possible for those same worms to reside in your pet’s gut, undetected, while shedding microscopic eggs that you can’t see.

Even indoor pets can be exposed to parasites. Fleas carry Tapeworms, and bugs such as flies and cockroaches can carry Roundworms. If your pet likes to catch bugs, she may be catching a whole lot more!

Getting your pet’s stool sample examined is easy. You collect the sample (we can provide a container for this purpose), bring it to us, and we’ll do the rest. [Testing fee applies.]

And if your pet’s poo is happily free of any parasites or other items of concern, we’ll e-mail this certificate that you can print out and post in a place of honor in your home:

 

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Heartworm Disease has been found in pets in all 50 states, including Virginia.

Dogs and cats are vulnerable to Heartworm Disease, which is transmitted by mosquitoes. As anyone who is familiar with southern Virginia knows, we have a mosquito problem. As a result, we also have a heartworm problem.

Heartworms not only live in the pet’s heart, they also migrate to the lungs. And although a dog can harbor over a hundred worms in its body, it takes only a single adult worm to cause a fatal inflammatory reaction in a cat.

Fast Facts:

Adult Heartworms can grow up to 12 inches long

Adult Heartworms can live 5-7 years

A dog can have as many as 250 worms in its body

You can protect your pet with a simple-to-use monthly preventative, such as HeartGard Plus or Revolution.

Contact Us so we can help you get your pet protected from Heartworm Disease.
p12-tip6

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FALSE.

Even cats that stay indoors their entire lives are at risk for parasitic infections. Why?

Because mosquitos, which transmit heartworm disease, often sneak into our homes.

Because fleas, which transmit tapeworms, often reside in our homes.

Because flies, which transmit roundworms, often buzz around inside our homes.

And if your cat is anything like mine, it loves to chase, catch, and eat bugs!

These are just some of the reasons your cat’s feces should be checked one to two times a year for parasites.

It’s also why we recommend Revolution for indoor cats. Revolution protects your cat against fleas, heartworms, roundworms, and ear mites.

Click on the graphic below to learn more about cats and parasites — then talk to us about protecting your indoor cat from heartworms, tapeworms, and roundworms.

Click to enlarge.

Click to enlarge.

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Since I’m always telling people that dried-up Tapeworm segments (proglottids) look like sesame seeds, I thought I would show the actual comparison.

Photo A:

Sesame seeds or Tapeworm segments?

Sesame seeds or Tapeworm segments? Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

 

 

Photo B:

Sesame seeds or Tapeworm segments?

Sesame seeds or Tapeworm segments? Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

 

 

Photo C:

Sesame seeds on the left; Tapeworm segments (proglottids) on the right. Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Sesame seeds on the left; Tapeworm segments (proglottids) on the right.
Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

 

So if you see a collection of these little doodads around where your dog or cat has been sitting, call the vet, because your pet has Tapeworms.

No, Fluffy did not get into the hamburger buns. Those are Tapeworm segments.

No, Fluffy did not get into the hamburger buns. Those are Tapeworm segments.

 

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I’ve been “inspired” by the number of flea cases coming in lately to share new photos of flea dirt.

I found a willing feline participant, gave it a good combing, and came up with the photos you see here.

To review: so-called “flea dirt” is flea feces, which is the blood that used to be inside your cat or dog. [Yuck.] Flea dirt is also food for flea larvae [double yuck], which is why it’s a good idea to clean up flea dirt when you see it. No need to feed the next generation of fleas!

Dry flea dirt and fur. Click to enlarge.

Dry flea dirt and fur.
Click to enlarge.

 

Flea dirt saturated with liquid. Click to enlarge.

Flea dirt saturated with liquid.
Click to enlarge.

 

Flea dirt reconstituting into blood. Click to enlarge.

Flea dirt reconstituting into blood.
Click to enlarge.

That last photo demonstrates what you might see when you bathe a pet that has fleas. The water may turn a pink or rust color as the flea dirt liquefies. 

Need help keeping fleas off your pet this autumn? Try Advantage, NexGard, Revolution for cats, or the Seresto collar.

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