Posts Tagged ‘Norfolk veterinarian’

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List of symptoms of pain in cats

List of symptoms of pain in dogs

List of common causes of pain in pets

If your pet is exhibiting signs of pain, contact your pet’s veterinarian (or a veterinary emergency practice) and be prepared to discuss the signs of pain, duration of symptoms (how long have you noticed the signs?), and any recent history or information that may help pinpoint the cause of pain. Your pet’s doctor will take it from there.

Keep in mind, your pet’s doctor may arrive at a diagnosis that is not found on the list above!


Disclaimer: Information on this site is provided for educational purposes only, and is not meant to diagnose, treat, or cure your pet. Information provided on this site does not take the place of a valid client-patient-doctor relationship, nor does it constitute such a relationship. Your pet’s veterinarian is the best source of information regarding your pet’s health. Your pet may require an examination and testing by a licensed veterinarian in order to provide proper diagnosis and treatment. Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff is responsible for outcomes based on information available on this site. Every pet’s condition is unique and requires the direct care and oversight of its own veterinarian.

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Is your pet’s microchip information up-to-date? It’s time to find out!

1 in 3 family pets will get lost…

microchipped pets are more likely to be returned to their homes…

however…

it is estimated that only 6 out of every 10 pet microchip IDs are registered in a searchable database — and some that are registered may contain outdated owner contact information.

A microchip ID is a valuable tool for reuniting lost pets with their families — but only if the chip is registered with current contact information.

You can check your pet’s microchip ID registry status in two ways:

  1. If you know your pet’s microchip ID number, visit www.petmicrochiplookup.org and enter the ID number. If registered, you can then contact the appropriate database [the contact info will be provided] to update your phone number and address.
  2. If you do not know your pet’s microchip ID number, bring your pet to a veterinarian, such as Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, for a free microchip scan. [Most chips can be read by our universal scanner.] Once the microchip ID number has been discovered, you can enter it into www.petmicrochiplookup.org and follow the instructions.

If your pet is not registered in any database, Pet Microchip Lookup will tell you the chip’s manufacturer and contact information so that you can register your pet’s microchip ID right away.

Contact Us to find out how we can scan your pet for a microchip.

Microchip ID statistics


This post originally appeared on August 15, 2019.

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Nationwide $500 Amazon giveaway

New pet owners can enter weekly to win one of 7 $500 Amazon.com gift cards good for everything their new BFFs (Best Fur Friends) will need!

Visit www.petinsurance.com/NewBFF and submit a new BFF e-card to enter.

 


Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff is associated with this offer; this post is for informational purposes only and does not guarantee that any particular reader will win. For complete contest rules and information, click the link above.

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If you feel like fleas are a never-ending problem, it’s because the largest portion of the flea population in your home is in its youth. Over a period of months, these young fleas grow up and head to your pets to eat a meal and to lay new eggs. New groups of fleas are maturing to adulthood all the time — and those are just the ones you see.

Get the flea life cycle timetable here.

On June 23rd, 2012, I scooped some flea eggs and flea feces (aka “flea dirt”, aka baby food for fleas) into a plastic Ziploc bag. Periodically, I checked the bag and photographed the contents as the eggs hatched, larvae squiggled around, and a couple of industrious flea wannabes worked their way toward adulthood.

Check out these photos of the normally unseen world of fleas. 

Flea eggs (on black paper)

Flea eggs on paper; photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic

 

Flea eggs (magnified; with “flea dirt”)

Magnified flea eggs and flea dirt; photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic

 

Isolated flea egg (magnified; with “flea dirt”)

Flea egg; photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic

 

Flea excrement (dried blood from the host animal; also known as “flea dirt”) This will be consumed by flea larvae for fuel

Flea dirt, often the first sign of a flea infestation; photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic

 

Flea larva (magnified)

Look closely to see the hairs along the larva’s body; photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic

 

Flea pupa in cocoon [left] and larva [right] (magnified)

Flea pupa safe in its cocoon, with larva and flea dirt; photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic

 

Immature flea (magnified) This little guy almost made it!

Immature flea, just out of its cocoon; photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic

 

Treating your dog? We recommend the Seresto 8-month Flea & Tick collar.

Treating your cat? We recommend Revolution.

Tip: Be sure to treat all dogs and cats in the household, plus your home and yard, to have a fighting chance against fleas.


This post originally appeared on July 23, 2012.

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national_pet_fire_safety_day

I’ll admit, when I began researching information about National Pet Fire Safety Day, I had a particular idea in mind: finding information that helps pet owners keep their pets safe from fire. What I found was different than I expected.

This article by the American Kennel Club and ADT Security Service suggests the purpose of National Pet Fire Safety Day is to raise awareness of how to prevent pets from starting fires.

Yep — you read that correctly. National Pet Fire Safety Day can be all about preventing fires started by pets.

So how might a pet start a fire? We’ve got a few ideas:

  • Cats love to knock things off tables, desks, counters, and other surfaces. Imagine a cat knocking a burning candle or cigarette onto a rug.
  • Dogs occasionally jump up on stoves to get food. A number dogs have knocked stove knobs into the “on” position beneath pots and pans, which have caught fire.
  • Some pets chew on electrical cords, which can create a fire hazard.
  • A pet can grab the cord of a clothes iron or curling iron and pull it down, igniting material on the floor — or the floor itself.

Do those hazards exist in your home? You may need to pet-fireproof your household.

  • Do not leave burning candles unattended, and keep pets out of rooms where there is an open flame. Consider switching to flameless candles.
  • Some stoves have removable knobs to prevent children and pets from accidentally turning on the stove or oven.
  • Put cord covers over exposed wires and cables, or crate your pet so it cannot chew cords while you’re away.
  • Keep pets out of rooms where heated appliances are used.

National Pet Fire Safety Day is also about protecting your pets from fires in the home:

  • Check smoke detectors in the home at least every 6 months to be sure they are working. Change the batteries at those times, also.
  • Affix an “Animals Inside” cling to windows or doors to alert first responders that pets inside will need rescuing.
  • Keep pets carriers and leashes near the door, for a quick evacuation.
  • Keep identification on your pets in case they escape or are brought to a shelter following a house fire. Consider a HomeAgain microchip — a permanent form of pet identification.

By following these tips on National Pet Fire Safety Day and every day, you and your pets can be safer at home.

Bonus: Order your free “Animals Inside” window cling from the ASPCA —  just click here!


This article originally posted on July 14, 2016.

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Note: This post contains images that may be alarming to some.
These photos were taken many years ago,
with the pet owner’s gracious permission,
to be shared for educational purposes.

 

Rodent ulcer 1

Rodent ulcer in a 16-year-old cat, pre-treatment. Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

If your cat shows up with a fat lip and she hasn’t been in a fistfight lately, she may have a rodent ulcer. Rodent ulcers (like the one shown above) typically appear on the upper lip, usually as a small swelling. Over time, and with frequent licking, the area can enlarge and ulcerate.

Rodent ulcer 2

Rodent ulcer, 13 days after beginning treatment. Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Rodent ulcers, also known as eosinophilic ulcers, are the result of eosinophils gone wild. An eosinophil is a type of white blood cell that releases biochemicals in response to an allergy or the presence of parasites. Sometimes, the biochemicals released by the “eos” attack the cat’s own tissue instead of an invading foreign body. The target area of the eos’ action becomes inflamed and sore.

Rodent ulcer 3

Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Rodent ulcers can be difficult to resolve, according to Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian. Anti-inflammatory medications may be called for. Recently, some veterinarians have begun using allergy medication with limited success. The patient in these photos was treated with a combination of medications, including an allergy drug, with immediate results. The patient’s ulcer reduced in size and the lip swelling decreased.

Rodent ulcer 4

Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Stubborn cases of rodent ulcer may require biopsy (to rule out cancer) and further study, including parasite treatments and food trials.  

If you notice a sore or swollen area on your cat’s lips or tongue, have your veterinarian check it out. Early treatment may help prevent permanent disfigurement.

Tip: remove plastic food and water bowls and plastic toys, as they can be irritants to cats sensitive to plastics.


This post originally appeared on January 14, 2016.

Disclaimer: Information on this site is provided for educational purposes only, and is not meant to diagnose, treat, or cure your pet. Information provided on this site does not take the place of a valid client-patient-doctor relationship, nor does it constitute such a relationship. Your pet’s veterinarian is the best source of information regarding your pet’s health. Your pet may require an examination and testing by a licensed veterinarian in order to provide proper diagnosis and treatment. Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff is responsible for outcomes based on information available on this site. Every pet’s condition is unique and requires the direct care and oversight of its own veterinarian.

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Man petting dog sitting on rock

Heading out to explore? Pack the essentials for your pet!

If cabin fever has gotten the best of you over the past few months, you may be ready to battle the bugs and go hiking or camping with your best furry friend.

To prepare your pet, update his Lepto and Lyme vaccines, make sure his heartworm dose is current, and snap on the Seresto collar.

Next, read these articles from the Pets Best Pet Insurance blog, for tips on successful and fun hiking and camping trips with your dog:

Hiking With Your Dog

Camping With Your Dog


Pets Best Pet Insurance

Photo credit: Ashan Rai via Pexels

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Clients often ask us which vaccines their dog really needs.

The answer depends on the pet’s lifestyle.

Small brown and white dog runs with green ball

Keep the fun going all summer — vaccinate your dog to protect him from common diseases.

We divide canine vaccines into several groups: core vaccines, social vaccines, and lifestyle vaccines.

Core vaccines include:

  • Rabies vaccine — this is the one vaccine required by law, because the Rabies virus kills people and pets.
  • DHPPv or DA2PPv (distemper/hepatitis/adenovirus/parainfluenza/parvovirus) — all dogs should receive this vaccine combination which protects against dangerous, common, and highly contagious diseases.

Social vaccines include:

  • Coronavirus — dogs that are around other dogs and other dogs’ feces (such as at dog parks, daycare, or going for walks, etc.) should receive protection from this disease that, when combined with parvovirus, often proves deadly.
  • Bordetella* — this highly contagious respiratory disease is notorious for spreading in shelters and boarding kennels; but if your dog visits the dog park, daycare, or groomers, she can be exposed to Bordetella there, too.
    *In many places, Bordetella is also considered a core vaccine, meaning it is recommended for all dogs.
  • Canine Influenza combo (CIV) — yes, dogs get the flu, too; and this one spreads from dog to dog wherever they congregate [just like Bordetella]. What makes Canine Influenza so sneaky is that infected dogs are often shedding the virus when they appear perfectly healthy, so your dog can be exposed while playing with them.

Lifestyle vaccines:

  • Leptospirosis — this bacterial infection is commonly spread in neighborhoods by raccoons, squirrels, and roof rats when they urinate in water, soil, and mud. Leptospirosis can be fatal to pets and people. If your pet spends time outdoors, including at campsites or hiking trails, they can be at risk for this disease.
  • Lyme Disease — this bacterial infection is spread by black-legged ticks (aka deer ticks), wherever ticks are found — including your own yard. If your pet spends time outdoors, goes hiking or camping with you, its risk for Lyme Disease increases.

Carefully consider your pet’s lifestyle, exposure to other animals, and habits when working with the veterinarian to determine which vaccines are recommended. Does your pet stay indoors with zero exposure to other animals? Does he travel out of state with you? Does she visit the dog park for exercise? Have you brought home a new pet that is more active outdoors than your current pet? The more information you can provide, the better your pet can be protected.

Questions? Contact Us!


Photo credit:  Matthias Zomer via Pexels


Disclaimer: Information on this site is provided for educational purposes only, and is not meant to diagnose, treat, or cure your pet. Information provided on this site does not take the place of a valid client-patient-doctor relationship, nor does it constitute such a relationship. Your pet’s veterinarian is the best source of information regarding your pet’s health. Your pet may require an examination and testing by a licensed veterinarian in order to provide proper diagnosis and treatment. Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff is responsible for outcomes based on information available on this site. Every pet’s condition is unique and requires the direct care and oversight of its own veterinarian.

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