Posts Tagged ‘Norfolk veterinarian’

Is it your imagination, or does your “brachy” dog have more problems than the Labradoodle next door? According to Nationwide Pet Insurance, you are not imagining it.

Let’s break it down:

A dog’s skull falls into one of three categories:
Dolichocephalic, mesaticephalic, or brachycephalic, as illustrated by the photo below.

Click to enlarge. Image can be found at http://www.onemedicine.tuskegee.edu

Brachycephalic (or “brachy”) dogs are those breeds with a flat, broad head. These breeds include —

  • Affenpinscher
  • Boston Terrier
  • Boxer
  • Brussels Griffon
  • Bulldog breeds
  • Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
  • Japanese Chin
  • Lhasa Apso
  • Mastiff breeds
  • Pekingese
  • Pug
  • ShihTzu

Nationwide Pet Insurance compared data for brachycephalic dog breeds versus dogs with longer skull types (dolichocephalic and mesaticephalic) and discovered that the dog breeds known for their flat, broad skulls showed a higher prevalence of certain diseases.

That means that more “brachy” dogs suffered the following conditions — 

  • otitis externa (ear infection)
  • pyoderma (skin infection)
  • atopic/allergic dermatitis
  • conjunctivitis (eye infection)
  • canine cystitis (bladder infection)
  • anal gland impaction
  • fungal skin disease
  • malignant skin neoplasia (cancer)
  • pneumonia

Does this mean you should stay away from “brachy” breeds? Not necessarily, as they can be very lovable and faithful companions.

But Norfolk veterinarian Dr. Donald Miele agrees that it does mean owners of those breeds should be aware of the greater likelihood of health problems, and that veterinary pet insurance is a worthy investment for owners of “brachy” breeds.


Learn more about Nationwide Pet Insurance


This article is not intended to diagnose, treat, or suggest treatment or cure for any disease.
Your pet’s veterinarian is the best source of information on your pet’s health.

 

 

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Need something to break out of the blues of social isolation?

We’ve got a list of heartwarming stories about the healing power of animals.

Woman kissing Yorkshire Terrier

  1. A woman suffering from a winter virus finds the best medicine doesn’t always come from a doctor.
    Read her story here.
  2. Author Karen Kingsbury gives her husband the Christmas gift he didn’t know he needed.
    Watch their story here.
  3. Reader’s Digest collected stories of hero pets that saved their owners’ lives.
    Read about them here.
  4. Time and time again, people have reported being saved by dolphins — some of the most intelligent and fascinating creatures on Earth. Read some of those amazing stories here and here.

Has an animal ever saved your life — literally or metaphorically? Tell us about it in the comments!


Photo by Viktoria Shalimova via Pexels.com

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Dear Clients,

As the number of people diagnosed with COVID-19 [aka novel Coronavirus] continues to rise in Hampton Roads, we are compelled to increase our protective measures — both for our clients and ourselves and as a matter of public health.

The following restrictions are currently in place:

*We cannot accept walk-ins for pet care or food & medication refills.

*Refill orders must be placed by phone; a pick-up time will be determined, and we will deliver the items to you at your vehicle in our parking lot. Please have your payment ready.

*Clients are asked to remain in their vehicle while their pet is seen by the doctor. If the pet is not comfortable in its owner’s absence, we will reschedule the visit.

*From this point, we are scheduling visits to take place in late April and beyond. We will continue to assess the local numbers of COVID-19, and make further decisions about whether or when to close the clinic and postpone all visits.

*In the event of an emergency, contact Blue Pearl Pet Hospital at 757-499-5463.

Other notes you may need:

*Our FAX machine is offline and unable to receive documents. Please route all documents through our email: littlecreekvet@live.com 

*Registered clients should Contact Us with any questions or concerns.

As much as possible:

STAY HOME, STAY SAFE AND BE WELL!

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Dear Clients,

There is much concern these days over COVID-19 [aka human Coronavirus] and its potential impact on everyone’s lives and livelihood. We want to be sure you have current information, especially as concerns pets.

At Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, we are cautiously proceeding with appointments, with safeguards in place:

*When possible, appointments will be spaced out to allow as few people in the clinic as possible and disinfection of high-touch areas between clients.

*Clients who are experiencing signs of illness such as coughing, sneezing, difficulty breathing, chest pains, vomiting, or diarrhea are asked to postpone their visit until their symptoms / illness have resolved. 

*We reserve the right to require clients who are coughing or sneezing during their visit to wear a face mask.

*Certain high-touch items which cannot easily be sanitized have been removed from our waiting room. These items include books, magazines, and pet treats. As for the remaining brochures: if you pick one, please take it with you instead of returning it to the rack.

*Dr. Miele and Little Creek Veterinary Clinic will continue to monitor the spread of COVID-19 in Virginia, and if necessary, will temporarily close the clinic and postpone appointments to safeguard the health of our clients, doctor, and staff.

Following is information released by the American Veterinary Medical Association regarding pets and people:

*Infectious disease experts and multiple international and domestic human and animal health organizations agree there is no evidence at this point to indicate that pets become ill with COVID-19 or that they spread it to other animals, including people.

*Out of an abundance of caution, it is recommended that those ill with COVID-19 limit contact with animals until more information is known about the virus. Have another member of your household take care of walking, feeding, and playing with your pet. If you have a service animal or you must care for your pet, then wear a facemask; don’t share food, kiss, or hug them; and wash your hands before and after any contact with them.

*Update your pet emergency kit to include 2-4 weeks’ worth of food and medications, in case of quarantine or closure of local veterinary practices.

*As a reminder, human Coronavirus [aka COVID-19] is not the same as canine Coronavirus. At Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, we continue to recommend vaccinating for canine Coronavirus, especially to protect dogs that socialize with other dogs or spend time in areas where other dogs are likely to defecate.

Clients, please Contact Us with your questions or concerns.

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Dear Clients,
Due to the serious nature of COVID-19 [aka Coronavirus], its presence locally, and our doctor and some clients falling into a high-risk category if they contract the disease, we are closed today (Friday, March 13th) in order to deep-clean and assess our readiness to protect the health of our clients and ourselves in the face of this new viral strain.

We also ask that, if you are showing signs of illness, have traveled to Coronavirus “hotspots” lately — or are in physical contact with someone who is sick or has been to an infected area — that you postpone your pet’s services for 2-3 weeks or until the potential for transmitting illness has passed.

We know this can be a major inconvenience, but health experts are recommending doing all we can to stop or slow the transmission of what, for some people, is a fatal illness.

Thank you for your patience and understanding.

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Does your cat have itchy ears? The #1 cause of itchy ears in cats is ear mites, according to Dr. Lynette Cole of Ohio State University.

At a lecture attended by Norfolk veterinarians and their staff, Dr. Cole listed the top three most common causes of itchy, inflamed ears in cats: parasites, polyps, and allergies.

Ear mites, which are a type of parasite, appear to be tiny white specks that move around, when seen through a magnifier such as an otoscope

Veterinary otoscope, used to examine ears.

 

Looking through an otoscope at a model cat ear.

Seen under a microscope, however, the situation becomes much more clear. Ear mites, known also as Otodectes cynotis, have eight legs and are very active crawlers. And if that weren’t enough Ick Factor — ear mites are arachnids, putting them in the same class as spiders and ticks.

Ear mite removed from a kitten. Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Ear mite removed from a kitten. (2) Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

What’s the first sign of ear mites? Since you can’t see the mites with your naked eye, the first visible sign of a problem may be a layer of crusty, black debris in your pet’s ear. Sometimes it looks like coffee grounds. By the time this debris appears, your cat is probably scratching her ears, which may be what prompts you to look inside the ears.

Since there may be other causes of “crud” in the ears, you’ll want your cat’s veterinarian to examine the ears to find out if ear mites are present. Then, the veterinarian will devise an appropriate treatment plan.

Ear mites can be transmitted from one pet to another, so the veterinarian may advise treating all pets in the household at the same time.

Check out these videos we’ve uploaded to our You Tube channel, featuring the ear mites shown in the photos above. One mite is mired in mineral oil, while the other mite speeds out of view!

Does your cat have itchy ears or suspicious-looking debris inside? Contact Us to schedule an appointment today!

[Our doctor cannot diagnose your pet over the phone or the Internet, so please schedule an appointment today.]

Bonus: Our cat patients that are treated with Revolution to protect against fleas, heartworms, and intestinal worms are also receiving protection from ear mites!


Disclaimer: Information on this site is provided for educational purposes only, and is not meant to diagnose, treat, or cure your pet. Information provided on this site does not take the place of a valid client-patient-doctor relationship, nor does it constitute such a relationship. Your pet’s veterinarian is the best source of information regarding your pet’s health. Your pet may require an examination and testing by a licensed veterinarian in order to provide proper diagnosis and treatment. Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff is responsible for outcomes based on information available on this site. Every pet’s condition is unique and requires the direct care and oversight of its own veterinarian.

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We Love Cats
Most of us think
of our cats as self-sustaining little creatures (except when it comes to using a can opener) — but the truth is, cats need vet care just like dogs.

Cats are especially stoic and will often hide signs of disease or illness until the problem becomes serious. An annual exam can help catch problems in the early stages. And even if a disease or physical disorder is not evident at the time of the exam, the veterinarian can remind you what to look for throughout the year and make health recommendations based on your cat’s age and living conditions.

If more than a year has passed since your cat’s last check-up, it’s time to get him to the vet.

 

Quick questions: Are your cat’s vaccines (including Rabies) up-to-date? When was the last time your cat’s stool was tested for parasites?

Now, take note of your cat’s everyday habits and appearance (especially cats older than 7):

  • Does it use the litterbox or has your cat begun urinating and defecating in inappropriate areas?
  • Does your cat urinate more frequently or in larger amounts than usual?
  • Does your cat eat and drink more or less than it used to?
  • Has your cat gained or lost a significant amount of weight?
  • Does your cat sleep longer hours than usual?
  • Does your cat howl or vocalize more often, especially at night?
  • Have you noticed any lumps, bumps, sores or other skin irregularities on your cat?
  • Are its eyes bright and shiny or cloudy and dull?
  • Are its ears clean and pale pink or crusty, bloody, or filled with dark wax?
  • Are its teeth clean and white or brown and coated with tartar?
  • Does your cat have foul, stinky breath?
  • Is your cat’s fur shiny and smooth or dull and spiky?
  • Does your cat have trouble jumping onto its favorite perch or climbing stairs?
  • Does your cat have fleas or Tapeworms?

Let’s get together and talk about your cat’s health:  load your cat into its carrier and bring her in for a check-up. Make notes of your concerns, so we address the changes you’re seeing in your cat at home.

One last tip: your cat’s toenails need regular trimming if she is not wearing them down on a scratching post. Learn how to clip your pet’s nails or ask a professional to trim them.


 

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