Posts Tagged ‘Norfolk veterinarian’

Cough, Gasp, Blurp – Causes of Vomiting in Dogs and Cats

White and tan English Bulldog on black rug

Did your best friend get sick on the carpet again? Let’s talk about it! [Photo by Pixabay via Pexels]

By Morris Animal Foundation

Who hasn’t woken up in the middle of the night to the sounds of a pet leaving a gift on the carpet/bed/laundry? If you own a dog or cat (or both), chances are you’ve had to clean up something your pet has brought up.

Although many pets experience an occasional episode of vomiting, it also can be a sign of many serious diseases. In addition, regurgitation can be mistaken for vomiting. The two are not synonymous and point toward different underlying problems. It’s important for owners to know the difference, and to know the various causes of vomiting and regurgitation to determine when a trip to the veterinarian is needed and when it isn’t.

The difference between these two activities all boils down to the problem’s anatomic location; esophagus for regurgitation and abdomen for vomiting.

The esophagus is a long tube stretching from the neck through the chest, emptying into the stomach. No digestion takes place in the esophagus, but it’s considered part of the digestive tract. The oral cavity also is part of the digestive system, but most diseases in this area don’t cause either regurgitation or vomiting.

The main business parts of the digestive tract are contained in the abdomen and include the stomach, liver, gall bladder, pancreas, small intestine, large intestine, cecum and anus. Problems in any of these areas can result in vomiting.

Knowing the anatomy helps understand the signs typically seen when problems occur in a specific area of the digestive tract.

Signs of regurgitation include:
*Passive expulsion of material – usually a pet lowers their head and material comes out
*No signs of nausea such as lip smacking or salivation
*Undigested food or other ingested material is common
*Occasionally frothy, foamy material is noted

Signs of vomiting include:
*Retching
*Nausea and salivation
*Contents can range from undigested to partially digested food, to liquid
*Expulsion is active and contents are often propelled with force
*Presence of bile

While taking a video of your pet can be helpful in guiding your veterinarian toward the best diagnostic tests, owners usually can’t respond quickly enough to catch the pet in the moment (while they are trying to get their pet off the carpet) or the owner isn’t present.

Unfortunately, most pet owners just find a pile of something on the floor and don’t witness the event itself. However gross, it’s important to note the characteristics of the material. This includes:

*The color of the material, paying special attention to the presence of red blood, dried blood (which looks like coffee grounds), bile (which is yellow), or brown, foul smelling material
*The presence or absence of food and if it’s digested or undigested
*The presence or absence of foreign material
*The presence or absence of lots of saliva or foam

Before we move on, we need to make a quick detour and talk about esophageal foreign bodies. As many of us know, dogs often don’t chew things 100 times as our grandmothers suggested – they often swallow food, toys and other objects after just a few bites. Occasionally, items are simply too large to pass through the esophagus into the stomach. Dogs with esophageal foreign bodies will salivate a lot, gag, paw at their mouth and retch – they can look a lot like a nauseous dog but their problem is esophageal.

This brings us to one of the most common questions heard by veterinarians and their staff – when is vomiting an emergency and when can a pet owner wait and watch?

As mentioned above, esophageal foreign bodies are an emergency. The vast majority of owners either witness their dog (cats rarely eat something too big!) eat something and then start gagging, or their dog is so clearly distressed they immediately seek veterinary care.

Other times, owners should seek veterinary care, is if there is blood in the vomitus; if a pet is vomiting and seems depressed, lethargic or has stopped eating; if vomiting/gagging/regurgitating is prolonged and severe; or if vomiting is intermittent but lasts longer than one week. A pet that vomits once or twice and seems bright and alert is one the owner can monitor closely.


Registered client? Contact Us with questions about your pet.


Morris Animal Foundation has funded a large list of studies looking for answers to the diverse diseases associated with vomiting in dogs and cats, including viral infections such as parvovirus in both dogs and cats, kidney disease and cancer. But there are still many unanswered questions. We need your help to find better ways to help our dogs and cats have better, healthier lives. Learn more about the scope of the studies we fund as well as our history and commitment to advancing animal health.

Original article can be found here.

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November is National Pet Cancer Awareness Month

Tips From the American Veterinary Medical Association

It’s a sobering reality: Cancer is the leading cause of death in dogs and while it’s not as prominent in cats, it’s often a more aggressive form of cancer.

You can be your pet’s advocate when it comes to treating cancer early on by spotting the telltale signs.

Contact your veterinarian if your dog or cat displays any of these signs of possible cancer. Remember, early detection is critical in the fight against pet cancer.

*Abnormal swellings that persist or continue to grow.
*S
ores that do not heal.
*Weight loss.
*Loss of appetite.
*Bleeding or discharge from any body opening.
*Offensive odor.
*Difficulty eating or swallowing.
*Hesitation to exercise or loss of stamina.
*Persistent lameness or stiffness.
*Difficulty breathing, urinating or defecating.

Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, adds that cancer in pets can mimic other diseases and disorders, so it’s important to perform tests that can tell the difference.
In Hampton Roads, we refer to oncologists who diagnose and treat cancer in pets.

Contact Us to schedule an appointment for your pet. 

Pet cancer infographic

Double-click to enlarge

Article and infographic courtesy of Nationwide Pet Insurance.

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Halloween schedule announcement

 

Image courtesy of The Graphics Fairy

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If your dog or cat has an emergency,
will you know what to do before you
take your pet to the veterinary hospital?

 

You can learn CPR and First Aid for cats and dogs at a class held November 24th in Williamsburg, VA (details and link below).

WHAT: Pet Emergency Education presents Canine and Feline CPR and First Aid Certification Class

WHEN: Sunday, November 24, 2019 from 1:30 – 4:30 PM

WHERE: James City County Library, 7770 Croaker Rd., Cosby Room, Williamsburg

COST: $69.95 up to $138.95, depending on level of registration

“Pre-registration required and ends 7 days prior to the class”

REGISTER HERE and learn details of the subjects covered in class

Note from Pet Emergency Education: “Although emergency first aid can improve the outcome of an animal that is experiencing a medical emergency, our company and our instructors will recommend that owners/caregivers seek veterinary care in all instances.”

Disclaimer: This post is provided for informational purposes. Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff are associated with this event and, as such, do not offer any guarantee or warranty on this class, its contents, or any outcomes as a result of attending this class.

Always check the event status for cancellations or rescheduling. 

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Barkitecture — a cornucopia of delightful designer doghouses — is coming to an end at Norfolk Botanical Garden this month. That means you have one week left to view, vote, and bid on these awesome abodes.

Check out a small sampling of the doghouses I saw recently (and see if you can guess my favorite!)  — Jen

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

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Nationwide Reveals the Wackiest Pet Names of 2019

Winners selected from a pool of 750,000 dog and cat monikers 

Beige cat wearing a crown

When only the wackiest name will do…
[Photo by Katarzyna Modrzejewska via Pexels]

DJ Skribbles and Bits and Jean Clawed Van Damme earned the distinction of owning the Wackiest Pet Names of the year. DJ Skribbles and Bits nosed out Stella Bean Dip in the dog division, while Jean Clawed Van Damme purred past Boba Fetticini to be crowned champions and receive a basket of goodies.

Each year, Nationwide, the nation’s first and largest provider of pet health insurance in the U.S., celebrates the most clever, creative and quirky pet names across the country. After a thorough selection process, the top 10 wackiest dog and cat monikers were chosen from Nationwide’s database of more than 750,000 insured pets and put to a public vote.

[See last year’s winners here!]

Below are the top 10 Wackiest Pet Names of 2019:

Dogs
1. DJ Skribbles and Bits
2. Stella Bean Dip
3. Big League Chewie
4. Ruff Bader Ginsburg
5. Bilbo Beggins
6. Nostadogmus
7. Albus Dumbledog
8. Grampaw
9. Indiana Bones
10. Captain Morgan Freeman

Cats
1. Jean Clawed Van Damme
2. Boba Fetticini
3. Henry Hissinger
4. Avocato
5. Wu Tang Cat
6. Schtinky Puddin
7. Hairy Pawter
8. Reece Whiskerspoon
9. Dave Meowthews
10. Alclawchino

“The results from our Wacky Pet Names competition illustrate the thought and creativity pet owners put into naming their furry family members,” said Carol McConnell, DVM, MBA, vice president of chief veterinary medical officer for Nationwide. “We’ve learned that some of these names are assigned just for laughs, but many hold a special meaning or story behind them. These unique, yet specific, names exemplify how pets are a part of the family.”

For photos and background stories of the top 10 wackiest dog and cat names, visit www.wackypetnames.com.

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About Nationwide pet insurance
With more than 750,000 insured pets, pet insurance from Nationwide is the first and largest pet health insurance provider in the United States. Since 1982, Nationwide has helped provide pet owners with peace of mind and is committed to being the trusted choice of America’s pet lovers.

Nationwide plans cover dogs, cats, birds and exotic pets for multiple medical problems and conditions relating to accidents, illnesses and injuries. Medical plans are available in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

Insurance plans are offered and administered by Veterinary Pet Insurance Company in California and DVM Insurance Agency in all other states. Underwritten by Veterinary Pet Insurance Company (CA), Brea, CA, an A.M. Best A+ rated company (2016); National Casualty Company (all other states), Columbus, OH, an A.M. Best A+ rated company (2016). Pet owners can find Nationwide pet insurance on Facebook or follow on Twitter. For more information about Nationwide pet insurance, call 800-USA-PETS (800-872-7387) or visit petinsurance.com

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From our inbox to yours:

White dog in garden

Photo by Yuliya Strizhkina (Cartier) from Pexels

WE LISTENED! 
By overwhelming demand, Norfolk Botanical Garden is extending SUNDAY DOG DAYS – all year!

EVERY SUNDAY!

EXPLORE THE GARDEN WITH YOUR CANINE BEST FRIEND.

MEMBERS AND MEMBERS’ DOGS ARE FREE
NOT-YET-MEMBERS’ DOGS: $5 (HUMAN ADMISSION APPLIES)
– BECOME A MEMBER TODAY.

YOUR DOG MUST REMAIN ON A LEASH AT ALL TIMES.

Dogs are not permitted in the Children’s Garden or Butterfly House.
Dogs are not permitted on Trams or Boats.

Fresh water is available throughout the Garden. Look for indoor and outdoor drinking fountains and bottle fill stations.

Forgot your bowl? Try our gift shop, and from March – October visit the Marigold & Honey Cafe terrace where your dog can enjoy a drink.

THOUGH DOGS ARE NOT PERMITTED DURING MILLION BULB WALK, YOU CAN BRING YOUR DOG TO BARKS & BULBS – COMING UP JAN. 3 & 4.

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