Posts Tagged ‘Norfolk veterinarian’

What is That in the Litterbox? Dealing With Diarrhea in Cats

Cat staring at camera

Is your cat trying to tell you something? (Photo by Immortal Shots, via Pexels)

By Morris Animal Foundation

Cats’ fastidious behavior when it comes to poop makes it easy to clean up, but also can mask changes in stool that would signal a potential health problem. Although diarrhea is less of a problem in cats than dogs, there are some similarities between the two species when it comes to underlying causes – as well as a few differences.

As a rule, veterinarians divide diarrhea into two broad categories based on where in the intestinal tract the diarrhea originates – small bowel (originating in the small intestine) and large bowel (originating in the large intestine). Although unpleasant, paying attention to stool quality of your pet can give your family veterinarian valuable clues to point them toward a diagnosis and best treatment.

Characteristics of small-bowel diarrhea include:
*Large volume
*Usually watery
*Frequency might or might not be increased

Diseases that cause small-bowel diarrhea in cats include intestinal viruses, intestinal parasites, cancer, hyperthyroidism and chronic enteropathy (inflammatory bowel disease)

Characteristics of large-bowel diarrhea include:
*Small volume
*Usually semi-formed or cow-patty consistency
*Increased frequency of defecation with straining
*Often contains mucus

Diseases that cause large-bowel diarrhea include stress colitis, intestinal parasites and megacolon (more on this condition later).

Sometimes, we can see characteristics of both small- and large-bowel diarrhea in a cat. This can occur when a disease process involves both the small and large bowel. We also can see this pattern when a patient starts with small-bowel diarrhea that causes secondary irritation of the large bowel.

Blood in the stool can be noted in both small- and large-bowel diarrhea.

Blood in the stool can take several forms:
*Digested blood from the stomach or small intestine results in black, tarry stools. This can be a challenge to diagnose in cats since their stools tend to normally be dark in color.

*Fresh streaks of blood mixed in the stool or coating the stool usually indicate a large-bowel problem

Concurrent vomiting is more common with small intestinal diseases although some studies suggest that vomiting occurs in 30% of cats suffering from large-bowel problems.

Hyperthyroidism in cats frequently causes diarrhea and can be easily overlooked in a diagnostic work-up for diarrhea. Many routine bloodwork panels for cats have a screening test for this disease.

Another disease seen almost exclusively in cats is megacolon. This disease begins when cats become constipated. The large intestine stretches but loses tone which leads to more constipation. Cats will often leak a little loose stool around the hard feces which can be interpreted by a cat owner as diarrhea. Megacolon is easily diagnosed on a physical examination and via X-ray.

If your cat has diarrhea, call your family veterinarian for guidance. In some cases, the loose stools will resolve without treatment. Your family veterinarian is the best person to help decide if and when further diagnostics or treatment is needed.

Morris Animal Foundation has funded more than 50 studies and invested $1.2 million dollars in studies focused on gastrointestinal tract problems. We’re on the cutting edge of gastrointestinal research, from the use of probiotics to studies looking at the gut microbiome. Check out all our studies and learn how you can help cats everywhere have longer, healthier lives.

Read Full Post »

There are so many things going on in September that we can’t fit them all on our Facebook header.

Here’s the list, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association:

September is…

*Catalyst Council’s Happy Cat Month
*Animal Pain Awareness Month ​

*National Disaster Preparedness Month
*Pet Sitter Education Month
*National Food Safety Education Month
*National Service Dog Month
*Responsible Dog Ownership Month

National Iguana Awareness Day
September 8

National Pet Memorial Day
September 8
Second Sunday in September

National Teach Ag Day
September 19

National Elephant Appreciation Day
September 22

National Deaf Dog Awareness Week
September 22-28
Last full week of September starting with a Sunday

Sea Otter Awareness Week
September 22-28
Last full week of September starting with a Sunday

National Farm Safety & Health Week
TBA

World Rabies Day
September 28​

Which event is most important to you?

Read Full Post »

Little Creek Veterinary Clinic will be closed on Friday, September 6th, due to expected hurricane conditions.

As soon as we are able to safely return to the office, we will inspect the building and contents, and determine when to re-open. Much of the decision is dependent, also, on whether or not there is a power outage in our area. 

At this time, it is unknown if we will be open Saturday, Sept. 7th or closed for the weekend.

We will update our website and Facebook page as more information becomes available.

Clients with appointments scheduled for Saturday will be notified of our status, directly, when possible.

Emergencies, call 757-499-5463.

Stay safe!

Read Full Post »

 

Storm sign

At Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, we are optimistically scheduling patient appointments for Thursday, Friday, and Saturday this week (Sept. 5-7).

However, if Hurricane Dorian arrives on our shores, we will close for safety’s sake, until the storm has passed and we have determined the building and its contents are ready for action.

We will make every effort to reschedule our Thursday, Friday, and Saturday patients, if our clinic must close due to the storm.

Please be aware that some vaccines and medications may be in short supply, due to shipping restrictions and business closings during rough weather. We will notify you if your pet’s appointment will be affected by shortages.

Read our post with links on Disaster Planning here.

Read our posts with links on storm stress in pets here and here.

 

Read Full Post »

If you or any member of your household is using 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) cream, it is important that the medication is never within reach of your pets.

5-fluorouracil is typically prescribed to treat skin cancers and other skin disorders in people. Its mode of action, which causes cell death, can be fatal to pets that ingest the cream. 

And according to the FDA, a pet may be exposed: 

  • by chewing through the medication packaging (often a tube)
  • when licking their owner who has applied the cream on themselves
  • by coming in contact with 5-FU residue on hands, clothing, carpets, furniture
  • by ingesting residue in cloths or medication applicators
  • when grooming itself after contact with a person who uses 5-FU (more likely in cats).

Time is not on your side:

Within 30 minutes of ingestion, a pet may begin vomiting and exhibiting tremors, ataxia (loss of muscle coordination, trouble walking), and seizures. Death can occur within six hours after exposure.

Treatment may not be available or effective:

Unfortunately, “there is no defined effective treatment for 5-FU toxicosis in dogs and cats,” according to a report in Vetted™ magazine, a professional veterinary publication. Exposure to even a small amount of 5-fluorouracil can be fatal to pets, even with aggressive emergency care.

If you believe your pet has been exposed to any medication intended for humans, immediately contact an animal poison control hotline, such as

ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at 1-888-426-4435*    or

Pet Poison Helpline at 1-855-764-7661*

*A fee will be applied to your credit card.

And be sure you know the location of the nearest pet emergency hospital. In Hampton Roads, we recommend Bay Beach and BluePearl.

Your best bet is prevention:

If you or someone in your household uses 5-fluorouracil [it may also be packaged as Carac, Efudex, or Fluoroplex], take special care to prevent your pet from any contact, no matter how small, with the drug. When discarding spent tubes, applicators, or anything that has contacted the medication, place the trash bag in an area that is inaccessible by your pets. Laundry that may contain traces of the medication should also be placed out of reach.

**************************************************************************************************
Information for this article is condensed from Vetted™, August 2019, Volume 114, Number 8

Read Full Post »

Join Canine Training Unlimited for a special painting event to benefit Saver of Souls Pet Rescue’s medical fund.

WHEN: September 8th, 12 – 4 PM
WHERE: 873 Clearfield Ave., Chesapeake
COST: $15-25 per craft

Link: Saver of Souls Pet Rescue  (S.O.S.)

Details below:

Charity event flyer

Come paint for a good cause!

Dr. Miele’s reminder:  When socializing your dog or cat with other pets, please be sure your pet is up-to-date on its vaccinations and heartworm preventative.

Not sure if your pet is up-to-date? Contact Us to find out.

*******************************************************************************************************
Note: Dr. Miele and Little Creek Veterinary Clinic are not associated with this event. Please direct all questions to S.O.S. at the link above.

Read Full Post »

August 15th is National Check the Chip Day — and for good reason:

1 in 3 family pets will get lost…

microchipped pets are more likely to be returned to their homes…

however…

it is estimated that only 6 out of every 10 pet microchip IDs are registered in a searchable database — and some that are registered may contain outdated owner contact information.

A microchip ID is a valuable tool for reuniting lost pets with their families — but only if the chip is registered with current contact information.

You can check your pet’s microchip ID registry status in two ways:

  1. If you know your pet’s microchip ID number, visit www.petmicrochiplookup.org and enter the ID number. If registered, you can then contact the appropriate database [the contact info will be provided] to update your phone number and address.
  2. If you do not know your pet’s microchip ID number, bring your pet to a veterinarian, such as Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, for a free microchip scan. [Most chips can be read by our universal scanner.] Once the microchip ID number has been discovered, you can enter it into www.petmicrochiplookup.org and follow the instructions.

If your pet is not registered in any database, Pet Microchip Lookup will tell you the chip’s manufacturer and contact information so that you can register your pet’s microchip ID right away.

If your pet does not have a microchip ID — a permanent form of identification — Contact Us to schedule an appointment to ‘chip your pet.

Microchip ID statistics

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »