Posts Tagged ‘microchip ID’

Leonardo is a neutered male Persian cat that went missing
from his home in the Ocean View section of Norfolk, on May 20th.

He has a microchip, so if you find him, he can be
scanned and returned to his family.

You may also call our office at 757-583-2619.

Leonardo Jo 1

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April 17 – April 23 is National Pet ID Week 

You’re probably wondering why an entire week out of the year is dedicated to this concept — rather than just a day or two. Well, it may be because each year, millions of dogs and cats go missing, and not all of them return home. Since many of those pets leave the house without any form of identification, it is clear that we still need to spread the word about the importance of pet identification.

According to HomeAgain, 1 in 3 pets will get lost during their lifetime; 10 million pets go missing every year; without ID, 90% of lost pets never return home.

The fact is, just like wearing a seatbelt increases your odds of surviving a car accident, wearing some form of identification increases a pet’s odds of being reunited with its family.

Common types of pet ID:

Identification tag
PRO: Can be personalized and gives the finder an immediate link to your contact info
CON: Tag info can wear off; tag must be replaced when you move or change phone numbers; tag can come off the collar or is lost when pet slips its collar

Tattoo
PRO: Is a permanent form of identification
CON: Is a code, rather than direct contact info; many pet finders are not familiar with tattoo databases; tattoos can blur; tattoos can be altered beyond recognition

Microchip
PRO: Safe, permanent form of pet ID; microchip lasts a lifetime; can be done as office visit at vet’s (no anesthesia required); support website [www.petmicrochiplookup.org] can provide info on any brand of chip; pet finders know to have stray animals scanned for a chip; owner can update contact info easily via internet (no need for a new chip); HomeAgain generates “lost pet” notices for enrolled animals; chipped and enrolled pets are protected against being claimed by a non-owner; animal shelters will work harder to reunite chipped pets with owners, rather than resort to euthanasia; microchip numbers cannot be altered
CON: Is a code, rather than direct contact info; some scanners may not be able to read certain chips

An implantable chip, 1/2 inch in length, can be the key to your pet's safe return. Microchip photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

An implantable chip, 1/2 inch in length, can be the key to your pet’s safe return. Microchip photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Whatever your preference, make sure your pet is identifiable, should it ever leave the home or yard. We invite you to Contact Us to learn more about HomeAgain microchips and to schedule your pet’s chipping today.

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Is your dog or cat 4 months of age or older? If so, it should have a current Rabies vaccination, which will be issued along with a Rabies tag. When placed on your pet’s collar, the tag provides valuable information to help people return your pet if he or she runs away.

Tags
But did you know there is another tag your pet should be wearing?
It’s the city pet license tag. 

All dogs are required to be licensed by the city in which they live.  Most local cities, such as Chesapeake, Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk and Virginia Beach, issue cat licenses, as well.  Pet licenses must be renewed each year and are granted to pets that have a current Rabies vaccination.

There is a small cost involved, and pet owners typically receive a discount on licensing fees for each spayed or neutered pet.  Senior citizens may receive an additional discount on fees for spayed or neutered pets.

     Click on your city’s name for information on license fees, due dates, and issuing agencies.

The Commonwealth of Virginia requires all dogs and cats over four months old to be vaccinated against Rabies

Virginia has also instituted a law requiring veterinarians to forward Rabies vaccination information to local city treasurers.  The treasurer compares information received from the veterinarians with its roster of licensed animals.  If an owner has not purchased a license, the treasurer will mail a notice to the owner requesting compliance.

Veterinarians are not required to report unlicensed animals to city agencies.  Our concern is the public health aspect of ensuring that pets and their owners are protected against Rabies, since Rabies is present in Hampton Roads.  Pet owners are responsible for complying with pet license rules in their city of residence.

A final note: a microchip ID is not a substitute for a Rabies or city license tag, nor are the tags a substitute for a microchip ID. Each form of identification has its own merits. To protect your pet with permanent identification that will not wear off, get lost, or be removed by a stranger, ask us for the HomeAgain microchip on your pet’s next visit.

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This article originally appeared January 22, 2015.

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We’re in for nasty weather this weekend — bad enough that many Neptune Festival events have been cancelled

So this is an apt time for us to remind you about storm and disaster planning. As a pet owner, you have an extra set of responsibilities, which require extra thought and preparation.

Here’s a guide to get you started:

1. If evacuating, determine whether you can safely and reasonably bring pets with you.
If yes – be certain the intended storm shelter, hotel, or other destination will accept pets.
If no – find out which local animal shelters and boarding kennels will accept pets during the storm.

2. Gather all paperwork showing that your pet is up-to-date on its vaccinations, whether your pet stays home or heads for higher ground.
If the vaccines are expired, now is a good time to renew them.

3. Stock up on your pet’s medications. In the case of evacuation, you may need two weeks’ to one month’s worth of medications on hand.

4. Transfer your pet’s food to a sturdy, water-proof container, to prevent spoilage.

5. When buying gallon water jugs for the family, figure in each pet as one more family member and purchase water accordingly.

6. Gather collars or harnesses, tags, leashes or pet carriers for easy access during evacuation.

7. Animals with storm anxiety may need extra care; those that tend to run or hide may be more safely kept in a roomy pet crate during the storm.

8. A permanent microchip ID, such as HomeAgain, is the best bet for reuniting pets and families that may become separated during the storm.

9. Pick up your copy of “Saving the Whole Family”available at our office for $2. The booklet has tips for owners of dogs, cats, reptiles, horses, and other pets. You’ll also find complete guides to building first-aid kits and evacuation kits. Get yours today!

Saving the Whole Family

Pick up a booklet today, for just $2. Available at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

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This post appeared on August 22, 2012.

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Nation’s Largest Pet Insurer Offers Pet Friendly Guidance for Summer Trips

Brea, Calif. (May 18,  2015) – Each year millions of pets accompany their families on vacation, and with summer approaching, Veterinary Pet Insurance Co. (VPI), the nation’s first and largest provider of pet health insurance, reminds pet lovers that the key to a safe vacation for our furry family members is preparation. To spread awareness about the potential dangers pets face during a trip, VPI sorted through its database of more than 525,000 insured pets to determine the most common travel-related pet injuries. Below are the results:  

Injury/Illness Travel Related Incident Average Cost for Treatment
Vomiting or Diarrhea Motion Sickness $226
Heat Stroke Pet Left in Car $575
Bruising or Contusion Sudden Car Stop $226
Sprain Jumping out of Car $185
Nasal Cavity Foreign Object Inhaling Debris while Head Out of Window $406
Laceration Hit with Debris while Head Out of Window $329

  VPI encourages people to plan ahead with these travel tips to ensure that their furry friends are safe during summer excursions:

  1. If traveling by car, secure your pet with a safety harness or well ventilated carrier to restrain them in case of a sudden stop or accident. 
  2. Never allow your pet hang out the window. Opening the window just a few inches will allow your pet to safely enjoy the breeze without the risk of inhaling debris or being struck by any objects. This will also prevent any temptation your pet may have of jumping out of the car.
  3. Feed your pet a smaller meal before your trip to prevent an upset stomach. Also remember to carry plenty of water to prevent dehydration.
  4. Bring your pets’ toys to accompany them during travel. The familiar smells can help comfort your pet and keep them occupied during the trip.
  5. Never leave your pet in a car unattended. Even with the windows cracked, temperatures in a car can increase drastically.
  6. Make sure your pet is wearing identification at all times in case she becomes separated or lost. Verify that your pet’s ID tag is up-to-date, durable, and includes your mobile phone number.
  7. Pack a recent photo of your pet along with current vaccination records. If your pet becomes lost, having a current photograph will make the search easier.
  8. Book a pet-friendly hotel. With more than 25,000 hotels in the U.S. allowing pets, there are plenty of properties from which to choose. Don’t assume all pets will be allowed, though: Some hotels place limits on the size of the dogs they allow. Call to check that your dog will be welcomed.
  9. Look up details about a veterinary hospital near your destination (phone number, hours, driving distance).  If your pet has a medical emergency you’ll be prepared and know where to go.

“Traveling with our pets can be fun, but it’s important to take the correct steps to ensure they are safe and comfortable,” said Carol McConnell, DVM, MBA, vice president and chief veterinary medical officer for VPI. “I recommend scheduling a pre-trip appointment with your veterinarian to confirm that your pet is in good health, and that your pet’s vaccinations are current. If your itinerary includes air travel, ask your veterinarian for a formal pet health certificate, which is required by most commercial airlines. Always consider your pet’s personality and determine if she or he can handle traveling, or if a change in surroundings may be too far outside the comfort zone for your pet.”

About Veterinary Pet Insurance

With more than 525,000 pets insured nationwide, Veterinary Pet Insurance Co./DVM Insurance Agency (VPI), a Nationwide company, is the first and largest pet health insurance provider in the United States. Since 1982, VPI has helped provide pet owners with peace of mind and is committed to being the trusted choice of America’s pet lovers.

VPI plans cover dogs, cats, birds and exotic pets for multiple medical problems and conditions relating to accidents, illnesses and injuries. Wellness coverage for routine care is available for an additional premium. Medical plans are available in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Additionally, one in three Fortune 500 companies offers VPI Pet Insurance as an employee benefit.

Insurance plans are offered and administered by Veterinary Pet Insurance Company in California and DVM Insurance Agency in all other states. Underwritten by Veterinary Pet Insurance Company (CA), Brea, CA, an A.M. Best A rated company (2013); National Casualty Company (all other states), Madison, WI, an A.M. Best A+ rated company (2014). Veterinary Pet Insurance, VPI and the cat/dog logo are service marks of Veterinary Pet Insurance Company. Nationwide, the Nationwide N and Eagle, and Nationwide Is On Your Side are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. ©2015 Veterinary Pet Insurance Company and Nationwide. Pet owners can find VPI Pet Insurance on Facebook or follow @VPI on Twitter. For more information about VPI Pet Insurance, call 800-USA-PETS (800-872-7387) or visit petinsurance.com.

 

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MISSING DOG in Norfolk.

Have you seen this girl trotting around the Roosevelt Gardens/Tarrallton area? She left home about 10 AM today and her family is very worried about her. This dog is microchipped.

If you have information on her whereabouts, please call 757-583-2619 or the local animal control office, so that she can be reunited with her family.

Missing dog 5_18_15

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UPDATE: Huey has been found and returned home.

(photo removed)

Please help get Huey back home. He disappeared tonight in the 23513 area of Norfolk.

Huey is an intact male Dachshund-mix breed dog with golden brown fur. 

He has a HomeAgain microchip ID and was wearing his tags.

If you find Huey, please call HomeAgain at 1-888-466-3242 and report his microchip number: 

Dogs on the run can often be shy about being touched on the head or face, so always use caution when approaching an unfamiliar dog.

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