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Posts Tagged ‘microchip ID’

What to do when you find a lost pet — Tips by HomeAgain

“You’ve been reading your Lost Pet Alerts, keeping a good lookout, and then, finally, you see a missing pet you know you can help! We don’t want to leave you hanging out there, PetRescuer, so we’ve compiled a list of tips and instructions for the best ways to approach a lost pet and what to do when you have a found pet in your care.

Approaching a Lost Pet

First things first, it’s really important to remember that lost pets are out of their element, and their behavior is often unpredictable. Be mindful of your approach:

  • Walk slowly toward the pet.
  • If the pet starts growling, back away.
  • Don’t make any sudden movements, like a quick grab for a collar, or you may provoke the pet into aggressive behavior.
  • If you can approach the pet without scaring it, try talking to it to give it a little reassurance.
  • Never put yourself at risk when trying to rescue a lost pet. Back away slowly and call animal control for help.

Sick and injured pets are almost always on the defensive, so in those situations, you should call animal control services for help. Even though you want to help, only trained professionals know how to handle these situations in a way that protects the pet and people involved.

What to Do With a Lost Pet

You’re standing toe-to-paw with a lost pet, now what? The first thing you need to do is check for a collar and ID tags and immediately call the number on the tags. Often, a pet will have an owner tag and a vet’s tag. Try to call the owner first, and if she doesn’t answer, try the vet.”

[Did You Know? If you find a dog or cat, Little Creek Veterinary Clinic will scan it for a microchip — FOR FREE — to help you get the pet back home.]

“As you may know, many lost pets don’t have collars. Cats generally don’t wear collars and tags, and lost dogs also have a tendency to lose their collars, too. So it’s pretty common to come across a lost pet without a collar and ID tags.

You have a few options for what to do with a lost pet with no form of visible ID:

  • Take it to a vet clinic or animal shelter to be scanned for a microchip.
    • If you take the pet to a vet clinic, please be aware that they may not shelter the pet until the owner is located–except maybe in the strange circumstance that it’s one of their patients.
  • Call a local shelter with animal control services to come and pick up the pet.
    • Not all shelters have animal control services, so you may have to call more than one.

If a microchip scan positively identifies the pet, then you have to decide whether to keep the pet in your care until the owner arrives or leave it with a shelter. This, of course, is a decision only you can make, and it depends entirely on your circumstances. All PetRescuers need to remember to keep any lost pets separated from their children and other pets. This helps ensure that everyone is safe, so that your good deed doesn’t end badly.

Thanks for all your help and remember to play it safe around lost pets. Happy rescuing!”

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Learn more about why Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends HomeAgain microchips for his patients, then Contact Us to schedule your pet for a quick and easy HomeAgain microchip ID implant.

  1. https://littlecreekvet.com/2014/09/23/getting-your-lost-pet-back-is-just-the-tip-of-the-iceberg-heres-why/
  2. https://littlecreekvet.com/2014/09/18/microchips-are-a-safe-effective-permanent-id-heres-why/
  3. https://littlecreekvet.com/2016/09/13/lost-pet-microchip-recovery/

 

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The back door is open, the back gate is open,
your pet is lost — panic time, right?

Wrong.

Now is the time for action, not panic.

Here are 10 things to do if your pet is lost, to make it easier for your lost pet to be returned to you:

  1. File a lost pet report with every shelter and animal control office within a 60-mile radius of your home and visit the nearest shelters daily, if possible.
  2. Get the word out to all veterinarians in the area. Sometimes people pick up a stray and drive it to a distant clinic.
  3. Walk or drive through your neighborhood several times each day. Enlist friends and family to help. Hand out a recent photograph of your pet with your contact information.
  4. Speak with your neighbors. The more people who know you have lost a pet and that you are desperately trying to find your pet, the more people will call you if they see a loose animal.
  5. Place flyers in the neighborhood and public places. To avoid scams, when describing your pet, leave out one characteristic and ask the person who finds your pet to describe it.
  6. Post about your pet on all pet recovery websites (like PawBoost.com) and services. Sites such as Craigslist.org, TheCenterForLostPets.com and FidoFinder.com broadcast your missing pet quickly.
  7. Consider a lost pet recovery service. There are numerous lost pet alert services that will contact homes, veterinarians, shelters and animal control organizations for a reasonable fee.
  8. Place food and water outside your home [warning: this may attract strays and wildlife.] Your pets may return to your home when they get hungry or thirsty. Consider placing food in a humane pet trap to capture them.
  9. Tell everyone you see about your pet and ask them to keep their eyes open. The more people you alert, the greater the chance someone will recollect seeing your pet in their area.
  10. Don’t give up. Be aggressive in your search, get lots of help and get the word out right away. You need those early hours to put up posters and start your search.

Bonus Tip: Protect your pet before it goes missing with a permanent microchip ID, like HomeAgain. A microchip ID helps to prove ownership and increases the chance that your pet will be returned to you. And be sure to keep your contact information updated in the microchip ID manufacturer’s database.

Ready? Contact Us at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic to schedule your pet’s ‘chip appointment.

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Article above originally produced by dvm360.

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UPDATE: This pet’s owner has been located.

This black and white dog was found in Virginia Beach at the intersection of Independence Blvd. and Virginia Beach Blvd. on Tuesday, January 9th.

 

 

(Photos removed)

She appears to be a Labrador mix and weighs approximately 37 lbs. She has no collar; no microchip ID was found during scanning.

The owner should be prepared to show proof of ownership in order to recover the pet.

(Note: This pet is not at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic at this time.)

If you are the owner, or know the pet’s owner, please call 757-583-2619 and we will direct you to the finder. If calling after-hours, please leave your name and phone number, or Contact Us online. 

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At Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, we’re praying that Hurricane Irma stays away, but we advise pet owners to have a plan in place if this storm — or any other — should head our way.

Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends that pet owners take the following precautions, whether they evacuate, ride out the storm at home, or head for a pet-friendly emergency shelter:

  • Gather your pet’s vaccine records, especially the Rabies certificate; you may need to show this information at shelters or hotels. (If your pet is not current on its vaccines, Contact Us to schedule an appointment today.)
  • Ensure you have at least a two-week supply (or more) of your pet’s most-needed medications. Drug refills can be difficult to come by if veterinary clinics are unable to re-open right away.
  • Pack a first aid kit. Suggested contents can be found in the booklet “Saving The Whole Family,” available at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic for $2.00.
  • Ensure you have adequate food and water for your pet — typically a minimum of two weeks’ worth, if evacuating. If there is time, order extra Prescription Diet food.
  • Be sure your pet can be identified with a microchip ID, ID tag, or tattoo, if it should become separated from you.
  • Gather leashes, collars or harnesses, and pet carriers, to safely transport your pet.
  • Pack a favorite blanket or toy, treats, and food/water dish to give your pet a sense of comfort and familiarity.
  • Continue to treat your pets for fleas and heartworms, as pests can become more problematic after a storm.
  • For dogs: pack a supply of waste bags. For cats: pack a small litter box with litter or paper towels.

For more information, pick up a copy of
“Saving The Whole Family,”
available now, at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

 

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If your pet ends up at a shelter, it may be difficult
to distinguish it from other similar-looking pets.

Tuxedo cat 1. Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic

Tuxedo cat 1.

Tuxedo cat 2.

Tuxedo cat 2.

Or it could be just this easy.

The key to your pet's return.

The key to your pet’s return.

HomeAgain Microchips offer instant, reliable identification
at the push of a button.

HomeAgain's universal scanner reads chips by any manufacturer, so all pets can make it safely home.

HomeAgain’s universal scanner reads chips by any manufacturer, so all pets can make it safely home.

Your pet can’t call home when it’s lost –
so let someone else make the call for her.

ha_logo_2009_web_512x144

Ask us to “chip” your pet on her next visit.
Visit HomeAgain to learn more.

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This article originally appeared on April 23, 2012.

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Leonardo is a neutered male Persian cat that went missing
from his home in the Ocean View section of Norfolk, on May 20th.

He has a microchip, so if you find him, he can be
scanned and returned to his family.

You may also call our office at 757-583-2619.

Leonardo Jo 1

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April 17 – April 23 is National Pet ID Week 

You’re probably wondering why an entire week out of the year is dedicated to this concept — rather than just a day or two. Well, it may be because each year, millions of dogs and cats go missing, and not all of them return home. Since many of those pets leave the house without any form of identification, it is clear that we still need to spread the word about the importance of pet identification.

According to HomeAgain, 1 in 3 pets will get lost during their lifetime; 10 million pets go missing every year; without ID, 90% of lost pets never return home.

The fact is, just like wearing a seatbelt increases your odds of surviving a car accident, wearing some form of identification increases a pet’s odds of being reunited with its family.

Common types of pet ID:

Identification tag
PRO: Can be personalized and gives the finder an immediate link to your contact info
CON: Tag info can wear off; tag must be replaced when you move or change phone numbers; tag can come off the collar or is lost when pet slips its collar

Tattoo
PRO: Is a permanent form of identification
CON: Is a code, rather than direct contact info; many pet finders are not familiar with tattoo databases; tattoos can blur; tattoos can be altered beyond recognition

Microchip
PRO: Safe, permanent form of pet ID; microchip lasts a lifetime; can be done as office visit at vet’s (no anesthesia required); support website [www.petmicrochiplookup.org] can provide info on any brand of chip; pet finders know to have stray animals scanned for a chip; owner can update contact info easily via internet (no need for a new chip); HomeAgain generates “lost pet” notices for enrolled animals; chipped and enrolled pets are protected against being claimed by a non-owner; animal shelters will work harder to reunite chipped pets with owners, rather than resort to euthanasia; microchip numbers cannot be altered
CON: Is a code, rather than direct contact info; some scanners may not be able to read certain chips

An implantable chip, 1/2 inch in length, can be the key to your pet's safe return. Microchip photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

An implantable chip, 1/2 inch in length, can be the key to your pet’s safe return. Microchip photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Whatever your preference, make sure your pet is identifiable, should it ever leave the home or yard. We invite you to Contact Us to learn more about HomeAgain microchips and to schedule your pet’s chipping today.

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