Posts Tagged ‘medications’

Dr. Miele will be out of the office for the latter half
of next week, beginning Wednesday.

Check your pet’s medications and order refills
by Tuesday, April 19th.

We have appointment slots available this week,
as well as Monday and Tuesday next week,
so now is a good time to Contact Us
to schedule your pet’s check-up and boosters.

798px-HammockonBeach

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Image by Micky via Wikimedia Commons

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Let’s begin with a partial list of the things pet owners may be embarrassed to admit to their veterinarian:

  • how much “people” food their pet eats
  • how little exercise their pet receives
  • how rarely the pet’s ears are cleaned
  • how difficult the pet is to medicate

Pills

All of the items listed above can be cause for concern, but difficulty administering at-home medication can cut across all medical issues.

Compliance with doctors’ recommendations is a hot-button issue in veterinary (as well as human) healthcare. Some of the top reasons for lack of compliance in following a doctor’s instructions are:

  • the owner’s forgetfulness
  • worry of side effects
  • inability to understand instructions
  • inability to administer medicine due to physical limitations
  • inability to administer medicine due to scheduling conflicts
  • inability to administer medicine due to pet’s character
  • the pet’s refusal to accept medication due to size of tablet or objectionable flavor
  • the pet’s apparent improvement before the course of treatment has been completed

The list goes on. The real problem arises when an owner does not immediately reveal to the veterinarian that they have been unable or unwilling to give the medication as instructed.  

What can happen? Well, two things, at least. 

1) The pet’s condition worsens, the doctor is made aware of the dosing problems, and the patient possibly faces more strenuous treatment the second time around, since the disease condition has progressed.

OR

2) The pet’s condition worsens, the doctor is not made aware of the dosing problems and subsequently goes on a wild-goose chase to figure out why the pet is not responding to treatment. The doctor may end up trying new drugs that the client is also unable to give. No one is helped.

Admitting you are unable to follow the doctor’s orders may be embarrassing to you, but watching your pet grow sicker without treatment is likely to be worse.

Our advice:

  • Make sure you understand all instructions given to you, including dosage amount, frequency of administration, what to do if you forget to give a dose, whether it’s okay to combine different drugs, and whether to give the medication with food or on an empty stomach.
  • Ask questions about anything you do not understand. If you get home and realize you have a question, call the vet ASAP.
  • Request easy-open (non-childproof) containers when needed.
  • Ask for a typed copy of instructions not already included on the pill container.
  • If you cannot give your pet its medication at all (especially if you fear being bitten), tell us! While this may limit our treatment choices, it will also save you time and expense. In most cases, once a drug has been dispensed, it is non-returnable. And medicine that sits in a cabinet, never to see the light of day (or the inside of your pet’s body) does no good at all.

Not every complication can be foreseen. Sometimes, the appropriate course of treatment is financially out of reach. Or perhaps your own health and life issues prevent you from doing all you would like to for your pets. It happens. In the meantime…

Let us know how we can better serve you when we dispense medications.

  • Do you need a large-print version of all instructions?
  • If a choice is available, would you prefer liquid or tablet medications?
  • Would you like a dosing demonstration?
  • Would you like a written timetable to coordinate administering multiple drugs?
  • Would smaller quantities help? It can be budget-friendly.
  • Would you like recommendations on flavorful pill concealers or other tricks* to improve the taste of medications?

It’s a team effort: the better we understand your lifestyle and capabilities, the better we can plan a treatment you can work with.

*Some pharmacies offer to compound drugs with a more palatable flavor. Though costlier, this may be the key to success for some pets.

We found this pet pilling demo on YouTube:  How to Give Your Pet a Pill.

What are your concerns about administering medications to your pets?

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This article was originally posted on July 20, 2012.

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If you have pet owners on your Christmas list, or you just want to pick up something handy for your own furbabies, you can shop at the vet’s office. 

Take a look at our Christmas gift basket to get a few ideas:

P1080913

Left to right in the basket:

HyLyt shampooa gentle, hypoallergenic moisturizing shampoo that promotes healthy skin and coat

Pill crushercrush pills into a fine powder and make them more palatable by mixing with food

Seresto collar for dogsup to 8 months of flea and tick control in one collar

Grooming glovesmall plastic studs remove loose fur and dirt while you pet your cat or dog

Free Form Snip TipsOmega 3 fatty acids promote healthier skin and coat, immune system, and joints

Jumbo nail trimmereasy-to-use nail trimmer for dogs and cats

Flea comb — closely-spaced teeth remove fleas and flea dirt, along with loose fur

VetzLife Oral Care gelremoves tartar from teeth and freshens breath; available in mint or salmon flavors

 

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Let’s begin with a partial list of the things pet owners may be embarrassed to admit to their veterinarian:

  • how much “people” food their pet eats
  • how little exercise their pet receives
  • how rarely the pet’s ears are cleaned
  • how difficult the pet is to medicate

Pills

All of the items listed above can be cause for concern, but difficulty administering at-home medication can cut across all medical issues.

Compliance with doctors’ recommendations is a hot-button issue in veterinary (as well as human) healthcare. Some of the top reasons for lack of compliance in following a doctor’s instructions are:

  • the owner’s forgetfulness
  • worry of side effects
  • inability to understand instructions
  • inability to administer medicine due to physical limitations
  • inability to administer medicine due to scheduling conflicts
  • inability to administer medicine due to pet’s character
  • the pet’s refusal to accept medication due to size of tablet or objectionable flavor
  • the pet’s apparent improvement before the course of treatment has been completed

The list goes on. The real problem arises when an owner does not immediately reveal to the vet that they have been unable or unwilling to give the medication as instructed.  

What can happen? Well, two things, at least. 

1) The pet’s condition worsens, the vet is made aware of the dosing problems, and the patient possibly faces more strenuous treatment the second time around, since the disease condition has progressed.

OR

2) The pet’s condition worsens, the vet is not made aware of the dosing problems and goes on a wild-goose chase to figure out why the pet is not responding to treatment. The vet may end up trying new drugs that the client is also unable to give. No one is helped.

Admitting you are unable to follow the doctor’s orders may be embarrassing to you, but watching your pet grow sicker without treatment is likely to be worse.

Our advice:

  • Make sure you understand all instructions given to you, including dosage amount, frequency of administration, what to do if you forget to give a dose, whether it’s okay to combine different drugs, and whether to give the medication with food or on an empty stomach.
  • Ask questions about anything you do not understand. If you get home and realize you have a question, call the vet ASAP.
  • Request easy-open (non-childproof) containers when needed.
  • Ask for a typed copy of instructions not already included on the pill container.
  • If you cannot give your pet its medication at all (especially if you fear being bitten), tell us! While this may limit our treatment choices, it will also save you time and expense. In most cases, once a drug has been dispensed, it is non-returnable. And medicine that sits in a cabinet, never to see the light of day (or the inside of your pet’s body) does no good at all.

Not every complication can be foreseen. Sometimes, the appropriate course of treatment is financially out of reach. Or perhaps your own health and life issues prevent you from doing all you would like to for your pets. It happens. In the meantime…

Let us know how we can better serve you when we dispense medications.

  • Do you need a large-print version of all instructions?
  • If a choice is available, would you prefer liquid or tablet medications?
  • Would you like a dosing demonstration?
  • Would you like a written timetable to coordinate administering multiple drugs?
  • Would smaller quantities help? It can be budget-friendly.
  • Would you like recommendations on flavorful pill concealers or other tricks* to improve the taste of medications?

It’s a team effort: the better we understand your lifestyle and capabilities, the better we can plan a treatment you can work with.

*Some pharmacies offer to compound drugs with a more palatable flavor. Though costlier, this may be the key to success for some pets.

We found this pet pilling demo on YouTube:  How to Give Your Pet a Pill.

What are your concerns about administering medications to your pets?

**************************************************************************
This article was originally posted on July 20, 2012.

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Pilling your pet just got easier!

 

     Get a FREE sample pack of Greenies Pill Pockets at our clinic, while supplies last.  (Limit, one pack per customer.) 

     Greenies has engineered these tasty little hollow treats in beef or chicken-flavor for dogs and chicken or tuna-flavor for cats.  There’s even a duck and pea formula for pets with food allergies.   

     Pill Pockets are easy to use:  insert the pill or liquid medication into the Pill Pocket, squeeze the top shut, and feed it to your unsuspecting pet.  Pill Pockets eliminate the need to use fatty foods such as hot dogs, cheese, and peanut butter to disguise medication.  

     Pets that take their full regimen of medicine are at lower risk of extended illness and pain or even secondary health problems.  Secondary health issues are those that are caused by an untreated original illness.  For example, a pet which refuses its medication for under-active thyroid could face obesity and skin disease as a result. 

     If your pet is a tough customer at dosing time, try Greenies Pill Pockets.  The first ones are on us! 

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