Posts Tagged ‘lost pet’

April 17 – April 23 is National Pet ID Week 

You’re probably wondering why an entire week out of the year is dedicated to this concept — rather than just a day or two. Well, it may be because each year, millions of dogs and cats go missing, and not all of them return home. Since many of those pets leave the house without any form of identification, it is clear that we still need to spread the word about the importance of pet identification.

According to HomeAgain, 1 in 3 pets will get lost during their lifetime; 10 million pets go missing every year; without ID, 90% of lost pets never return home.

The fact is, just like wearing a seatbelt increases your odds of surviving a car accident, wearing some form of identification increases a pet’s odds of being reunited with its family.

Common types of pet ID:

Identification tag
PRO: Can be personalized and gives the finder an immediate link to your contact info
CON: Tag info can wear off; tag must be replaced when you move or change phone numbers; tag can come off the collar or is lost when pet slips its collar

Tattoo
PRO: Is a permanent form of identification
CON: Is a code, rather than direct contact info; many pet finders are not familiar with tattoo databases; tattoos can blur; tattoos can be altered beyond recognition

Microchip
PRO: Safe, permanent form of pet ID; microchip lasts a lifetime; can be done as office visit at vet’s (no anesthesia required); support website [www.petmicrochiplookup.org] can provide info on any brand of chip; pet finders know to have stray animals scanned for a chip; owner can update contact info easily via internet (no need for a new chip); HomeAgain generates “lost pet” notices for enrolled animals; chipped and enrolled pets are protected against being claimed by a non-owner; animal shelters will work harder to reunite chipped pets with owners, rather than resort to euthanasia; microchip numbers cannot be altered
CON: Is a code, rather than direct contact info; some scanners may not be able to read certain chips

An implantable chip, 1/2 inch in length, can be the key to your pet's safe return. Microchip photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

An implantable chip, 1/2 inch in length, can be the key to your pet’s safe return. Microchip photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Whatever your preference, make sure your pet is identifiable, should it ever leave the home or yard. We invite you to Contact Us to learn more about HomeAgain microchips and to schedule your pet’s chipping today.

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Is your dog or cat 4 months of age or older? If so, it should have a current Rabies vaccination, which will be issued along with a Rabies tag. When placed on your pet’s collar, the tag provides valuable information to help people return your pet if he or she runs away.

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But did you know there is another tag your pet should be wearing?
It’s the city pet license tag. 

All dogs are required to be licensed by the city in which they live.  Most local cities, such as Chesapeake, Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk and Virginia Beach, issue cat licenses, as well.  Pet licenses must be renewed each year and are granted to pets that have a current Rabies vaccination.

There is a small cost involved, and pet owners typically receive a discount on licensing fees for each spayed or neutered pet.  Senior citizens may receive an additional discount on fees for spayed or neutered pets.

     Click on your city’s name for information on license fees, due dates, and issuing agencies.

The Commonwealth of Virginia requires all dogs and cats over four months old to be vaccinated against Rabies

Virginia has also instituted a law requiring veterinarians to forward Rabies vaccination information to local city treasurers.  The treasurer compares information received from the veterinarians with its roster of licensed animals.  If an owner has not purchased a license, the treasurer will mail a notice to the owner requesting compliance.

Veterinarians are not required to report unlicensed animals to city agencies.  Our concern is the public health aspect of ensuring that pets and their owners are protected against Rabies, since Rabies is present in Hampton Roads.  Pet owners are responsible for complying with pet license rules in their city of residence.

A final note: a microchip ID is not a substitute for a Rabies or city license tag, nor are the tags a substitute for a microchip ID. Each form of identification has its own merits. To protect your pet with permanent identification that will not wear off, get lost, or be removed by a stranger, ask us for the HomeAgain microchip on your pet’s next visit.

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This article originally appeared January 22, 2015.

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MISSING DOG in Norfolk.

Have you seen this girl trotting around the Roosevelt Gardens/Tarrallton area? She left home about 10 AM today and her family is very worried about her. This dog is microchipped.

If you have information on her whereabouts, please call 757-583-2619 or the local animal control office, so that she can be reunited with her family.

Missing dog 5_18_15

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TagsIs your dog or cat 4 months of age or older? If so, it should have a current Rabies vaccination, which will be issued along with a Rabies tag. When placed on your pet’s collar, the tag provides valuable information to help people return your pet if he or she runs away.


But did you know there is another tag your pet should be wearing?
It’s the city pet license tag. 

All dogs are required to be licensed by the city in which they live.  Some cities, such as Chesapeake, Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk and Virginia Beach, issue cat licenses, as well.  Pet licenses must be renewed each year and are granted to pets that have a current Rabies vaccination.

There is a small cost involved, and pet owners typically receive a discount on licensing fees for each spayed or neutered pet.  Senior citizens may receive an additional discount on fees for spayed or neutered pets.

     Click on your city’s name for information on license fees, due dates, and issuing agencies.

The Commonwealth of Virginia requires all dogs and cats over four months old to be vaccinated against Rabies

Virginia has also instituted a law requiring veterinarians to forward Rabies vaccination information to local city treasurers.  The treasurer compares information received from the veterinarians with its roster of licensed animals.  If an owner has not purchased a license, the treasurer will mail a notice to the owner requesting compliance.

Veterinarians are not required to report unlicensed animals to city agencies.  Our concern is the public health aspect of ensuring that pets and their owners are protected against Rabies, since Rabies is present in Hampton Roads.  Pet owners are responsible for complying with pet license rules in their city of residence.

A final note: a microchip ID is not a substitute for a Rabies or city license tag, nor are the tags a substitute for a microchip ID. Each form of identification has its own merits. To protect your pet with permanent identification that will not wear off, get lost, or be removed by a stranger, ask us for the HomeAgain microchip on your pet’s next visit.

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This post appeared on January 22, 2013.

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A news story published today in the Virginian-Pilot tells the story of an Australian Shepherd that ran off into the woods in Suffolk several months ago, breaking her owner’s heart.

Mrs. Conroy has been searching for Angel since Mother’s Day. Though Angel has been spotted on occasion, she has run when approached. At this point, her whereabouts are unknown. 

The photo below was taken in our waiting room on Angel’s last visit to us, in April. After 5 months astray, she may be dirty, rough-looking, and skinny, though her coloration should remain the same. As you can see in the photo, she has one brown eye and one blue eye.

If you see her, please call Suffolk Animal Control for assistance. Their number is 757-514-7855.

Angel-Rem Co

Click to enlarge. Photo by Jennifer Miele.

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Getting your pet back after it’s gone missing is the best part of microchipping — and it’s the part you can see. But what about the foundation —  all the work that goes into getting your pet back to you? Read on to learn why HomeAgain has (in our opinion) the best lost pet recovery system out there.

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Each new microchip registration comes with a one-year membership with full benefits, including:

  • 24/7 Lost Pet Specialists, ready to serve you
  • Rapid Lost Pet Alerts sent to area veterinarians and shelters
  • Medical Insurance for lost pets (up to $2950; must be activated by pet owner)
  • Personalized Lost Pet Posters, to help you spread the word
  • 24/7 Emergency Medical Hotline – first aid advice when you need it
  • Travel assistance up to $500* to get your pet home (*applies to airfare costs for pets located more than 500 miles from home)

After the first year, you decide whether to continue your membership benefits. Either way, your pet will be permanently enrolled in HomeAgains database – and there is no additional yearly cost simply to remain enrolled.

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If your pet ends up at a shelter, it may be difficult
to distinguish it from other similar-looking pets.

Tuxedo cat 1. Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic

Tuxedo cat 1.

Tuxedo cat 2.

Tuxedo cat 2.

Or it could be just this easy.

The key to your pet's return.

The key to your pet’s return.

HomeAgain Microchips offer instant, reliable identification
at the push of a button.

HomeAgain's universal scanner reads chips by any manufacturer, so all pets can make it safely home.

HomeAgain’s universal scanner reads chips by any manufacturer, so all pets can make it safely home.

Your pet can’t call home when it’s lost –
so let someone else make the call for her.

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Ask us to “chip” your pet on her next visit.  Visit HomeAgain to learn more.

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This article originally appeared on April 23, 2012.

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