Posts Tagged ‘liver disease’

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From anxiety issues to urinary tract infections, we’ve got natural nutritional supplements for pets that can reduce reliance on pharmaceuticals and help your pet feel better.

At Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, our line-up of nutritional supplements supports dog and cat health in these areas: liver, gastrointestinal tract, joints, urinary tract, skin, and emotional health.

Our favorite nutritional supplements for pets include Cranberry Plus, Dasuquin, Denamarin (not shown), Free Form Snip Tips, Solliquin, Vetri DMG, and Vetri Mega Probiotic.

Nutritional supplements often are used alongside traditional medications and other supportive treatment. At Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, we use supplements to promote good health and reduce symptoms and lessen the chance of recurrence of certain medical problems.

Always consult your pet’s veterinarian before starting your pet on a nutritional supplement. Unless directed otherwise, stick to supplements specially formulated for pets (skip the human products).

Nutritional supplements can enhance your pet’s health, but often are not sufficient to treat or cure a particular disease or disorder. Be sure to partner with your pet’s veterinarian to determine if a nutritional supplement can help your dog or cat.

Contact Us to schedule an appointment at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic to discuss your pet’s health today.

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This article is not intended to diagnose or treat any disease or disorder and is not a substitute for veterinary care or a client-doctor-patient relationship.

Always check with your pet’s doctor before adding any supplement to your pet’s diet.

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New Year’s Resolution to Lose Weight Applies to Our Pets As Well

Brea, Calif. (Jan. 1, 2015) The number one New Year’s resolution in America is to lose weight and data shows that pet owners should extend that resolution to their dogs and cats. New data released by Veterinary Pet Insurance Co., (VPI), the nation’s first and largest provider of pet health insurance, reveals that pet obesity is on the rise for the fourth straight year. In 2013, VPI policyholders filed for more than $52 million in claims for conditions and diseases that can be related to pet obesity, a 7.3 percent growth from 2012.

    Table scraps and excessive treats are major contributors associated with disproportionate weight gain in pets. Similar to their human counterparts, excessive body fat increases the risk of preventable health problems and shortens the life expectancy of pets. VPI, a Nationwide company, recently sorted through its database of more than 525,000 insured pets to determine the top 10 dog and cat obesity-related conditions. Below are the results:

Most Common Dog Obesity-Related Conditions Most Common Cat Obesity-Related Conditions
1. Arthritis 1. Bladder/Urinary Tract Disease
2. Bladder/Urinary Tract Disease 2. Chronic Kidney Disease
3. Low Thyroid Hormone 3. Diabetes
4. Liver Disease 4. Liver Disease
5. Torn Knee Ligaments 5. Asthma
6. Diabetes 6. Arthritis
7. Diseased Disc in the Spine 7. High Blood Pressure
8. Fatty Growth 8. Heart Failure
9. Chronic Kidney Disease 9. Gall Bladder Disorder
10. Heart Failure 10. Immobility of Spine

 

Click to enlarge.

Click to enlarge.

“Pet owners need to be aware of the damage excessive weight gain can have on their pet,” said Dr. Carol McConnell, DVM, MBA, vice president and chief veterinary medical officer for VPI. “Pet lovers need to be conscious of the calories in food and treats they are giving their pets. The New Year is a perfect time for pet owners to start managing their pet’s eating habits and establish a regular exercise routine to avoid obesity. Regular wellness visits to your veterinarian are the most effective way to monitor your pet’s weight, along with being aware of signs of weight gain.”

    In 2013, VPI received more than 39,000 canine claims for arthritis, the most common joint disease aggravated by excessive weight. The average claim fee was $300 per pet. For cats, bladder or urinary tract disease was the most common condition that can be aggravated by obesity. VPI received 4,700 medical claims for this ailment – with an average claim amount of $420 per pet.

    In addition to taking pets to the veterinarian for regular wellness visits, below are simple tests you can perform to determine if your pet needs to lose weight: 

  • You should be able to lightly feel your pet’s ribs without pressing.
  • You should see a noticeable “waist” on your pet, between the back of the ribs and the hips, when viewing your pet from above. When looking from the side, your pet’s belly should go up from the bottom of the ribcage to inside the thighs.

About Veterinary Pet Insurance

    With more than 525,000 pets insured nationwide, Veterinary Pet Insurance Co./DVM Insurance Agency (VPI) is a member of the Nationwide family of companies and is the first and largest pet health insurance company in the United States. Since 1982, VPI has helped provide pet owners with peace of mind and is committed to being the trusted choice of America’s pet lovers.

    VPI Pet Insurance plans cover dogs, cats, birds and exotic pets for multiple medical problems and conditions relating to accidents, illnesses and injuries. CareGuard® coverage for routine care is available for an additional premium. Medical plans are available in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Pet owners can find VPI Pet Insurance on Facebook or follow @VPI on Twitter. For more information about VPI Pet Insurance, call 800-USA-PETS (800-872-7387) or visit petinsurance.com.

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     If you’ve noticed mushrooms sprouting in the yard, pull them up and dispose of them in a tightly lidded trash can.  Depending on the variety of mushrooms, ingestion can lead to gastrointestinal upset, seizures, even death.

 

     Although dogs are more likely to sample the fungus among us, cats are at risk, also.  Signs of mushroom toxicosis include vomiting, diarrhea, and excessive drooling.  More serious signs to watch for are convulsions, muscle spasms, and fly-biting seizures (snapping at the air.) Pets can also develop serious kidney and liver disorders as a result of eating mushrooms.

 

 

     If you think your pet has ingested mushrooms, take him to the emergency hospital.  If you are able to locate a piece of the mushroom in question, wrap it in paper towels and carry it in a paper (not plastic) bag to show the vet. 

 

Source:  Article by Dennis Blodgett, DVM, PhD, Diplomate, ABVT, Toxicology, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine

 

 

 

 

Important phone numbers for a pet poison emergency:
ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center 1-888-426-4435
Pet Poison Helpline 1-800-213-6680
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This article was originally posted on September 13, 2011.

 

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