Posts Tagged ‘Little Creek Veterinary Clinic’

Today’s guest post is by Dr. Heather Brookshire, a veterinary ophthalmologist at Animal Vision Center of Virginia.

Helping Hard-working Service and Therapy Animals See Clearly
By Dr. Heather Brookshire

While dogs don’t wear glasses, they do need to have their eyes checked regularly, especially if they are a registered service or therapy animal.

May is National Service Dog Eye Examination Month, and many board-certified diplomats of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists (like Dr. Heather Brookshire) will offer free screenings for these hard-working and caring creatures throughout the month.

We know how important it is for these animals to have healthy eyes.

The staff at Animal Vision Center of Virginia is happy to provide free exams for qualified service animals not only in May, but every month of the year. It helps us detect signs of ocular disease early, allowing the animals to keep up their important work without missing a beat.

To qualify for the exam, service animals must be active working animals certified by a formal training program or organization, or are currently enrolled in a formal training program. If you would like to schedule a free screening, call Animal Vision Center of Virginia today at 757-749-4838.

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Reprinted with permission.
Animal Vision Center of Virginia is not associated
with Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.
To apply for the free service dog eye examination,
contact Animal Vision Center of Virginia directly.


Your pet’s eyes are delicate organs.
If you have a concern about your pet’s eyes,

Contact Us or a veterinary ophthalmologist
to schedule an appointment.

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If your dog or cat is 4 months or older, it should have a current Rabies vaccination, which will be issued along with a Rabies tag. When placed on your pet’s collar, the tag provides valuable information to help people return your pet if he or she runs away.

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But did you know there is another tag your pet should be wearing?
It’s the city pet license tag. 

All dogs are required to be licensed by the city in which they live.  Most local cities, such as Chesapeake, Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk and Virginia Beach, issue cat licenses, as well.  Pet licenses must be renewed each year and are granted to pets that have a current Rabies vaccination.

There is a small cost involved, and pet owners typically receive a discount on licensing fees for each spayed or neutered pet.  Senior citizens may receive an additional discount on fees for spayed or neutered pets.

     Click on your city’s name for information on license fees, due dates, and issuing agencies.

The Commonwealth of Virginia requires all dogs and cats over four months old to be vaccinated against Rabies. 

Virginia has also instituted a law requiring veterinarians to forward Rabies vaccination information to local city treasurers.  The treasurer compares information received from the veterinarians with its roster of licensed animals.  If an owner has not purchased a license, the treasurer will mail a notice to the owner requesting compliance.

Veterinarians are not required to report unlicensed animals to city agencies.  Our concern is the public health aspect of ensuring that pets and their owners are protected against Rabies, since Rabies is present in Hampton Roads.  Pet owners are responsible for complying with pet license rules in their city of residence.

A final note: a microchip ID is not a substitute for a Rabies or city license tag, nor are the tags a substitute for a microchip ID. Each form of identification has its own merits. To protect your pet with permanent identification that will not wear off, get lost, or be removed by a stranger, ask us for the HomeAgain microchip on your pet’s next visit.

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This article originally appeared January 22, 2015.

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At Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, we love to give a special award to pets whose poop is free of parasites and eggs, blood, and foreign objects.

The Clean As A Whistle Award is one that nearly everyone can strive for.

[Pets with certain medical conditions may show blood in the stool, even during treatment — we totally understand!]

Here are the latest recipients of the coveted Clean As A Whistle Award:

  • Bear H.
  • Daisy W.
  • Harley Quinn K.
  • Izzy K.
  • Lucy C.
  • Maggie May M.
  • Molly H.
  • Luna M.
  • Goldie G.
  • Willy T.
  • Pulpita F.
  • Mia T.
  • Kimber F.
  • Mykah Jean N.
  • Smokey H.
  • Bindi G.
  • Lucky L.
  • Sam M.
  • Happy R.
  • Remi M.

Good job, everyone!

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May 2019 check-up and vaccine reminders have been sent out.

If your pet is due for boosters or other services
at this time of year, check your Inbox, Spam folder,
or snail-mailbox for a notice from us.

Or Contact Us at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic,
to find out when your pet is due next for services.

 

Special delivery!

 

Images from The Graphics Fairy.

 

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Bones, Muscles and Joints

Keep your pet moving and grooving this Spring — 
Schedule their yearly checkup today!

Musculoskeletal diseases (conditions that involve bones, muscles and joints) can affect pets of all ages. They can have aches and pains like we do. But sometimes these diseases are hard to spot. Think about your furry friend for a moment…

Have they stopped jumping on you when they greet you at the door?

Have they stopped perching on the window sill?

Is your pet acting “old?”

These changes in activity may be due to weather, age or good training. However, to guarantee your pet is at their best, we have to rule out they don’t have a hidden musculoskeletal problem. Infections, hormonal imbalances, nutrition, blood disorders and arthritis can all affect your pet’s activity—the way they play, move, eat and cuddle!

The good news is we have ways to prevent, cure or manage these conditions, so your pet can continue to have a good quality of life. We are committed to the well-being of your pet for their lifetime. The best way to do this is to book your pet’s yearly checkup today.

Contact Us for an appointment at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic and together, we’ll keep your pet’s bones, muscles and joints (and the rest of your furry friend) in good working order!

Bonus reading:

Dasuquin Joint Health supplement

J/D Prescription Diet for joint health

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Admit it: your cat has an awesome life. And now that you’ve added food puzzles and the perfect scratching post, your cat’s life is darn near perfect.

But is it possible to improve upon perfection? Your cat says, “Yes!”

Here are 4 more ways you can improve your cat’s life today:

  1. Multiple litterboxes. This is especially important when living with several cats or other pets in the house. Cats often won’t cross a “barrier” created by another cat or pet blocking the litterbox. Having extra litterboxes in different areas of the house (including on each floor of a multi-level home) gives your cats choices and helps prevent accidents.
  2. A safe space. Cats like to hide out and nap in private spots, without worry of being harassed by pets or people. Popular hiding spots include an empty box, dark closet, beneath furniture, and high up on cabinets. If your cat doesn’t have a hiding spot, try to provide one, such as a covered cat bed.
  3. Play time. Cats are natural hunters, so look for toys they can “chase.” Pick up some cat-safe toys that require your involvement, and get silly with your cat.  Bonus: Play time helps your cat bond with you and burn calories.
  4. Calming pheromones. Cats can feel more relaxed and less territorial when they are exposed to pheromones (chemical signals) just like the ones they secrete from glands in their face (which they love to rub on you and everything in their environment.) Try Feliway plug-ins to send a chemical message to your cat that says, “Relax.”

It’s your cat’s home — you’re just living in it!

Tips for this blog post are based on advice by feline care expert Dr. Ilona Rodan, via dvm360 Magazine.

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When the air warms up, dogs and their people head to the dog park for exercise and socializing. Let’s keep it fun for everyone!

Here are seven steps you can take to help your pet have a safe, happy season at the dog park:

  1. Keep your dog current on its vaccinations. Bacterial and viral diseases can be spread through direct contact with other dogs; through contact with contaminated objects; and through contact with other dogs’ feces.
  2. Protect your pet against fleas, ticks, and heartworms with easy-to-give monthly preventatives. Just because another dog brings fleas to the park, that doesn’t mean your dog has to bring them home!
  3. Get your pet’s stool tested for intestinal parasites several extra times a year. Monthly preventatives protect against many kinds of intestinal parasites, but no single product provides complete protection against everything out there.
  4. Know how to recognize signs of aggression — whether in your dog or another — and be sure to remove your pet before things get dangerous. Check out these body language cues that warn of impending trouble: https://littlecreekvet.com/2014/05/20/dog-bite-prevention-2014/
  5. Train your pet to respond to your commands, such as Come, Sit, Stay, and Leave It. Knowing these basic commands can help your pet get out of a danger zone when you call him.
  6. Check the posted dog park rules. Some parks segregate dogs by size or have other rules. These rules are for the safety of all dogs using the park — including your own.
  7. If your dog is fearful and does not wish to socialize, don’t force it. She may be happiest just hanging out with you — and that’s perfectly fine!

BONUS — Learn more about dog park safety on Little Creek Veterinary Clinic’s blog: https://littlecreekvet.com/2016/06/28/dog-park-mishaps/

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