Posts Tagged ‘Little Creek Veterinary Clinic’

If you love animals and you’re in need of positive vibes from the Internet, we’ve found some places you can visit to feel much, much better!

Photo by rawpixel.com via Pexels

On Twitter: Cute Emergency https://twitter.com/CuteEmergency

On Instagram: The 10 best pet accounts (according to Digital Photography Review): https://www.dpreview.com/post/7960048854/10-pets-insta

On Facebook: Funny Pets https://www.facebook.com/ofunnypets/

By Daddy Dolls: Custom pet pillows, using your photos: https://daddydolls.com/LargePetPillow

Enjoy!

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With daily high temperatures in the 80s and 90s,
it’s time for a reminder on how to prevent deadly heat stroke in pets.

Photo by Pixabay via Pexels

For long-time readers of this blog, this post on heat stroke looks familiar. Why? Because I’ve been posting it nearly every year since 2010. Every year, pets suffer heat stroke, but it doesn’t have to be that way. So I’ll keep repeating this column until heat stroke in pets is a thing of the past.

Heat Stroke in Pets

Do you know how to protect your pets from heat stroke during the muggy days of summer? This goes beyond the usual caveat of “never leave your pet in a car while you go shopping, babysit, attend a sporting event, spy on your ex, etc. Here are some tips to keep your pet safe in the yard or out and about:

  • Keep pets indoors as much as possible, especially if they are sluggish or panting soon after going outdoors.
  • Limit exercise to brief walks in the coolest parts of the day. Keep in mind that hot pavement and sand can burn pets’ paws.
  • Provide plenty of cool water. Check water throughout the day, as it can become hot if left outdoors. 
  • Kennels and pens should have good ventilation and air circulation and should be kept in shaded areas.

Warning Signs of Heat Stroke or Heat Stress

Your pet may need emergency assistance if it exhibits any of the following signs:

  • Excessive panting and drooling
  • Bright red gums
  • Balance problems
  • Lethargy
  • Staring or anxious expression
  • Labored breathing
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Failure to respond to commands
  • High fever
  • Collapse

What To Do

Lower your pet’s body temperature by easing him into a cool (not freezing) bath. Water from the outdoor hose may be hot, so that may not be your best option.  

Bring your pet indoors and place him in a tub, taking care to keep his mouth and nose above water [we use stacks of towels to accomplish this.] 

Apply ice packs to his head and neck. 

Call your veterinarian for further instructions. In most cases, your pet will be hospitalized for treatment and observation. By necessity, this sort of care may take place at a veterinary emergency hospital.

Who Is At Risk of Heat Stroke?

Any pet can have heat stroke, but some are more susceptible than others. All pets need to be protected on hot days. However, these pets are more likely than others to have a problem:

  • Very young and older pets
  • Short-nosed/pug-nosed breeds
  • Overweight pets
  • Pets with cardiovascular or respiratory disorders
  • Pets with a previous history of heat stress

Heat stroke is a life-threatening emergency. If you suspect your pet has heat stroke, we recommend taking him to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for comprehensive care.

[Information borrowed from “Summer Pet Tips” by Ralston Purina Company and “Summer Safety Tips” by Firstline magazine.]

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This article was originally published on July 28, 2010.

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Nature hikes aren’t just for people — your dog can also enjoy exercising in the great outdoors, beyond your yard, at Norfolk Botanical Garden all summer.*

Stock photo by Liesbeth Koopmans via Pexels

Summer Sunday Dog Days 2019 at Norfolk Botanical Garden

*Sundays in June, July, August, September & October
9 AM – 7 PM

Members and Members’ Dogs are FREE
Not-yet-members’ Dogs: $5 (human admission applies)

Know before you go: Double-check for any changes to the schedule or hours before arriving at the Garden.

Your dog must remain on a leash at all times.
Dogs are not permitted in the Children’s Garden or Butterfly House.

Watch this blog for more dog-friendly events at Norfolk Botanical Garden — located less than 2 miles from Little Creek Veterinary Clinic!

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How to Build a Safe and Stylish Catio

Posted on April 14, 2017 under Cat Articles at PetsBest.com 

By Julie Sheer, Houzz.

It’s the dilemma of every cat owner: how to let Kitty enjoy the outdoors without risk of the Great Escape. The outside world can be a dangerous place for a roaming cat, with the threat of predators, cars, poison and diseases. Not to mention the danger to wild birds, which outdoor cats kill in monumental numbers. Catios — or cat patios — are safely enclosed playhouses for felines that provide fresh air, mental stimulation and exercise.

Cats confined indoors are at higher risk for stress-related diseases, says Dr. Martine van Boeijen, a cat veterinarian in Perth, Australia. “An enclosed catio, which safely confines your cat to your property, allows your cat to have the best of both worlds.” Here is a basic guide on custom, kit and DIY options for adding a catio to your home.

Catios can be as elaborate as a custom-designed feline jungle gym or as simple as enclosing a patio with screening. Here, Rasputin enjoys one of the perches in a custom catio built in Arcadia, California.

Suggested Features
It’s important to make sure catios are escape-proof and include basic feline comforts:

  • Entry door or window, or walkway or tunnel from the house
  • Perches, ramps, steps, bridges, catwalks
  • Post or tree for scratching and climbing
  • Hiding places
  • Beds, pillows or hammocks for resting

Finish reading this article at PetsBest.com


Bonus Links 

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Little Creek Veterinary Clinic has added two new products to its line-up of natural remedies for anxiety:

Calming Extra comes in a soft chew and is recommended for dogs and cats.

 

 

HomeoPet Anxiety Relief is a liquid and is also recommended for dogs and cats.

 

Pets may experience anxiety related to: 

  • car rides
  • veterinary or grooming visits
  • thunderstorms and fireworks
  • separation from the owner (including boarding)
  • changes in the household or pet’s routine

Natural, plant-based products such as Calming Extra and Anxiety Relief can help your pet relax, without sedative side-effects, and are easy to administer.

Contact Us to learn more about these and other anxiety relief products.

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If You Care, Leave It There — Wild Baby Animals May Not Need Your Help

Morris Animal Foundation
April 18, 2019

With spring busting out around us, animals of all shapes and sizes are preparing for the arrival of little ones. Nests are built, dens dug and burrows lined with soft material in preparation. However, parenting is a bit different in the wild and you’ll want to know what that means when you come upon a seemingly lost baby animal.

It’s not unusual for a raccoon mom to leave her babies sleeping up in a tree for the day or a doe to leave her young alone and hidden for long stretches of time. These babies are not abandoned. It’s just the parenting style adapted by these species to keep their young safe. 

Intervening when help is not needed is harmful to wildlife, especially young ones. There’s a saying in the wildlife rehabilitation world – if you care, leave it there. One way to help recognize a true wild animal emergency is to learn about the species that live in your backyard and in the wilderness spaces near you. Also, know who to contact in those rare instances that human intervention is necessary. A little knowledge goes a long way in helping you decide what to do – and what not to do – when you come across a baby animal in the wild.

Tips to Help Keep Wild Babies Safe

1. Know Wildlife Parenting Styles
Mother rabbits only feed their kits once or twice a day, usually around dawn and dusk. A doe only visits and nurses their fawn a few times a day to avoid attracting predators. It’s normal to find fully feathered songbird babies on the ground and parents caring for them for several days until these young birds master flying.

2. Assess the Situation
If wildlife babies have good body condition, seem well fed and growing, leave them alone. These animals are not abandoned. In contrast, if you see an animal with poor body condition, visible wounds, bleeding, vomiting, shaking, these animals need help. Consult your veterinarian or contact a wildlife rehabilitation facility near you if you think an animal is in crisis.

3. Rescue or Call in the Professionals?
Rehabilitators can provide you with instructions on how to rescue and transport different species of baby animals. Always wear gloves or other protective clothing when handling any wild animal to minimize your risk of being bitten or scratched.

What about animals higher up on the food chain, like eagles or even young mountain lions? Leave them alone and call in the professionals. Many rehabilitators have a network of volunteers specially trained to rescue and transport these animals.

Never try to rescue an animal that is disoriented, having trouble breathing, acting aggressively or is covered with visible parasites, and make sure your children and pets stay away, too. Call your local animal control agency, whose professionals can safely capture, test and sound the alert if an animal is infected with a transmissible disease such as rabies, distemper, mange and even plague.

4. Re-nesting is OK
If you find an uninjured bird that is a hatchling (featherless, eyes closed) or nestling (starting to develop feathers, eyes open), they often can be re-nested. You can either replace the original nest if it’s been blown down or make an artificial nest and secure it to a tree near where you found the baby bird. Then watch and see if the parents return to care for their young.

If you find an uninjured baby squirrel with its eyes still closed, place the animal in a container near the base of the tree where you found it. Once the baby calls out, the parent will locate it and re-nest the baby for you. In either case, if no bird or squirrel parent returns within several hours of your re-nesting attempt, these animals may need professional help and care to survive.

5. Know Who to Call
See if your veterinarian is part of a rehabilitation network that can treat wildlife or exotics. If not, many clinics, especially emergency clinics, have lists of local rehabilitation facilities and the types of animals they assist. You also can contact your local humane society, the Audubon Society, wild bird stores, your local animal control officer, or an aquarium or marine patrol (for marine reptiles and mammals).

6. If You are Unable to Reach a Professional Immediately
If you can easily handle the wild animal, place the baby in a box with airholes, lined with something soft, like a T-shirt or towel. Keep the animal in a warm, dark, quiet place. Darkness makes the animal feel more secure. To minimize stress, leave the animal alone.

Although this sounds counterintuitive, do not provide food or water, unless instructed by a professional to do so. Different animals have species-specific nutritional needs. Also, providing even a small amount of water runs the risk of the animal getting wet, chilled and even drowning if the animal is small and vulnerable. What seems like an act of kindness may actually do more harm than good.

7. It’s Illegal to Care for Injured Wildlife
In many areas, it is illegal to keep and care for wildlife without a proper license and training. You risk the possibility of being fined so know the laws in your state or region. They are there to protect both you and the animal.

A wildlife baby’s natural parents always are the best option to raise that animal and give it the best chance of survival. Knowing when not to intervene is equally as important as knowing when to rush in and help. Veterinary or rehabilitation professionals are your best resource for saving a life, sometimes by just letting you know to when to leave the animal alone.

Learn more about how Morris Animal Foundation is saving wildlife through our health studies.
Our work is helping researchers develop life-saving diagnostics, treatments and strategies for rehabilitation and rescue organizations, so they can save even more lives. From sea turtles to raptors to marsupials, wherever an animal lives, we are here to help. And we couldn’t do it without the generous support of our animal-loving donors.

This article originally appeared on Morris Animal Foundation’s website here.

More from Morris:

https://littlecreekvet.com/2018/05/17/know-the-warning-signs-of-cancer-in-cats-and-dogs/

https://littlecreekvet.com/2018/05/22/heres-what-you-need-to-know-about-preventing-cancer-in-your-pets/

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Today’s guest post is by Dr. Heather Brookshire, a veterinary ophthalmologist at Animal Vision Center of Virginia.

Helping Hard-working Service and Therapy Animals See Clearly
By Dr. Heather Brookshire

While dogs don’t wear glasses, they do need to have their eyes checked regularly, especially if they are a registered service or therapy animal.

May is National Service Dog Eye Examination Month, and many board-certified diplomats of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists (like Dr. Heather Brookshire) will offer free screenings for these hard-working and caring creatures throughout the month.

We know how important it is for these animals to have healthy eyes.

The staff at Animal Vision Center of Virginia is happy to provide free exams for qualified service animals not only in May, but every month of the year. It helps us detect signs of ocular disease early, allowing the animals to keep up their important work without missing a beat.

To qualify for the exam, service animals must be active working animals certified by a formal training program or organization, or are currently enrolled in a formal training program. If you would like to schedule a free screening, call Animal Vision Center of Virginia today at 757-749-4838.

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Reprinted with permission.
Animal Vision Center of Virginia is not associated
with Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.
To apply for the free service dog eye examination,
contact Animal Vision Center of Virginia directly.


Your pet’s eyes are delicate organs.
If you have a concern about your pet’s eyes,

Contact Us or a veterinary ophthalmologist
to schedule an appointment.

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