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Posts Tagged ‘Little Creek Veterinary Clinic’

  1. It’s National Take Your Dog To Work Day — June 22, 2018!
    If you’re participating, we’d love to see a photo of your pet at work. Share it to our Facebook page.
  2. Little Creek Veterinary Clinic will be closed on Friday afternoon, this week, and we’ll resume office hours Saturday. Contact Us to claim a Saturday appointment slot for your pet.

 

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From anxiety issues to urinary tract infections, veterinarians are using natural nutritional supplements — sometimes called “nutraceuticals” — to help support healthy body function in pets and, in some cases, reduce reliance on drugs (pharmaceuticals).

 

At Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, our line-up of nutritional supplements supports dog and cat health in these areas: liver, gastrointestinal tract, joints, urinary tract, skin, and emotional health.

Our favorite nutritional supplements for pets include Cranberry PlusDasuquin, Denamarin (not shown), Free Form Snip Tips, Solliquin, and Vetri Mega Probiotic.

Nutritional supplements often are used alongside traditional medications and other supportive treatment. Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends supplements for his patients: to promote good health, reduce symptoms, and lessen the chance of recurrence of certain medical problems.

Always consult your pet’s veterinarian before starting your pet on a nutritional supplement. Unless directed otherwise, stick to supplements specially formulated for pets (skip the human products).

Nutritional supplements can enhance your pet’s health, but often are not sufficient to treat or cure a particular disease or disorder. Be sure to partner with your pet’s veterinarian to determine if a nutritional supplement can help your dog or cat.

Contact Us to schedule an appointment at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic to discuss your pet’s health today.

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This article is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or suggest a treatment for any disease or disorder. This article is not a substitute for veterinary care or a client-doctor-patient relationship, nor does it constitute such a relationship. Your pet’s veterinarian is the best source of information regarding your pet’s health.

Always check with your pet’s doctor before adding any supplement to your pet’s diet. Examination, tests and a treatment plan may be necessary before beginning nutritional supplements. Not all supplements are appropriate for all pets. Ask your veterinarian. 

Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff is responsible for outcomes based on information available on this site.

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Weatherford, TX

Just before Halloween, area man Sam Fletcher adopted “Buck,” a young Dalmatian who was hit by a car and left on the side of the road. Dr. Hank Baxter of Baxter Veterinary Clinic treated “Buck” for a broken leg and sent him home the following day.

Fletcher’s housemates, Phyllis Newsom and Carolyn Wilbarger, baked a batch of dog treats for the veterinarian’s other four-legged patients as a way to say “thank you” for the care “Buck” received. The treats were delivered to Baxter Veterinary Clinic in time for its annual Halloween party.

To the shock of everyone gathered at the popular event, police arrived and arrested Dr. Baxter for the murder of his wife, well-known surgeon Dr. Susan Baxter. Susan’s sister and brother-in-law, Meredith and Jack Carlyle, expressed their strong belief that Dr. Baxter had killed his wife, who was found bludgeoned to death in her office.

Convinced that the police were barking up the wrong tree and that someone’s been burying evidence, Fletcher begged Newsom, whose son is a Parker County deputy sheriff, to help him find the real killer. Joined by “Buck,” the friends engaged in a dogged pursuit of the murderer, who attempted to muzzle them permanently when they got too close to the truth.

Perhaps no one was more surprised than Fletcher and Newsom when Dr. Susan Baxter’s murderer turned out to be…

To find out how the story ends, click here.

What I’m reading now:

“Trick or Deadly Treat” by Livia Washburn

Bonus: This book contains recipes for delicious treats for dogs and their owners!

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Happy Pet Appreciation Week,
from Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.
Need some ideas on how to show love
to your pets all year ’round? Check this list!

Pet Appreciation Week — love your pets!
Click to enlarge for easy reading.

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There are plenty of opportunities in June
to show your love for your pets (and wildlife).

American Humane’s Adopt-a-Cat Month®​

ASPCA’s Adopt a Shelter Cat Month

National Zoo and Aquarium Month​

National Dairy Month

Pet Appreciation Week
June 3-9
First full week in June

Hug Your Cat Day
June 4

World Oceans Day
June 8

World Pet Memorial Day
June 10
Second Sunday in June

​​National Pollinator Week​
June 18 – 24

Take Your Dog to Work Day
June 22

How will you celebrate?

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Hello! Dr. Miele will be taking a long weekend, and will be out of the office from Saturday, May 26th through Monday, May 28th (Memorial Day).

Dr. Miele will resume regular appointment hours at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic on Tuesday, May 29th. Call 757-583-2619 to schedule your pet’s appointment. Some openings are still available this week on Friday.

Emergency care for your pets is provided by Blue Pearl in Virginia Beach. Call 757-499-5463 if your pet parties a little too hard this weekend.

And what will you be doing with your time off? We’ve got some ideas for you:

  1. Grab a frozen treat at Penguin’s Snoballs (in front of the Roosevelt Shopping Center on East Little Creek Road).
  2. Let your inner child out to play at the St. Pius X Parish & School Carnival — open to everyone! (At the corner of Halprin and East Little Creek Road).
  3. Go see Solo: A Star Wars Story. No, it’s not Harrison Ford “CGI’d” to look 1/3rd his age. Go see it anyway.
  4. Prefer your entertainment on-stage? Grab tickets to the Sondheim musical “A Little Night Music,” now showing at The Little Theatre of Norfolk.
  5. Take in the awe-inspiring wonders of Lantern Asia by night, only at the Norfolk Botanical Garden.
  6. Visit the Hampton National Cemetery and remember the fallen, including those who died far from home.

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   In our previous post, we reviewed Ten Warning Signs of Cancer in Dogs and Cats, as reported by the Morris Animal Foundation (MAF). MAF is a leader in funding research that improves animals’ lives. Cancer is a chief health concern.

   Eleven million dogs and cats are diagnosed with cancer each year. The number is staggering — but there are things pet owners can do to help prevent cancer in their pets.

   Today, we share Morris Animal Foundation’s list of 12 things you can do to reduce your pet’s risk of developing cancer.

CLICK HERE to download the list for easy reading.

 

CLICK HERE to download the list for easy reading.

 

   To learn more about the Morris Animal Foundation, the good work they do, and how you can be a part of the movement toward better animal health, visit their website:  www.morrisanimalfoundation.org

 

Disclaimer: Information on this site is provided for educational purposes only, and is not meant to diagnose, treat, or cure your pet. Information provided on this site does not take the place of a valid client-patient-doctor relationship, nor does it constitute such a relationship. Your pet’s veterinarian is the best source of information regarding your pet’s health. Your pet may require an examination and testing by a licensed veterinarian in order to provide proper diagnosis and treatment. Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff is responsible for outcomes based on information available on this site. Every pet’s condition is unique and requires the direct care and oversight of its own veterinarian.

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