Posts Tagged ‘Little Creek Veterinary Clinic’

Help for anal gland problems is here!

Glandex supplements

Boot the scoot with Glandex!

If your pet makes frequent visits to the veterinarian to have its anal glands (or “sacs”) emptied or treated for infection, Glandex may hold the solution.

Normally, the fluid that is formed in the anal glands (a natural, normal process) is released when your pet has a firm bowel movement. Sometimes the fluid gets blocked (“impacted”), turns into a thick paste, or the anal sac becomes inflamed, and your pet needs help.

Common causes of impacted anal glands are:

  • soft or loose stools
  • digestive problems
  • allergies
  • infection
  • obesity
  • anatomical issues
  • a combination of these problems

You might notice your pet doing one or more of the following:

  • “scooting” or dragging its rear end along the ground
  • licking or chewing at its rear
  • acting uncomfortable (may have difficulty with stairs)
  • straining to defecate
  • producing a foul odor / foul brownish discharge from rear
  • swelling or bleeding from a small hole next to the rectal opening
  • cats may defecate outside the litterbox
  • some pets vomit or have diarrhea (though this is less common)

So how does Glandex help? 

Glandex is a chewable or powder supplement that uses a fiber blend to add bulk to stools, which then helps release anal gland fluid normally with each bowel movement.

Glandex has natural anti-inflammatory ingredients (including omega-3 fatty acids) to address the inflammation and allergies that may be causing your pet’s anal gland problems.

Glandex also includes probiotics and digestive enzymes to aid the health of your pet’s digestive system.

Glandex is available at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic in a beef liver powder for dogs and cats or a peanut butter soft chew treat for dogs, which you give your pet once per day.

Clients, please Contact Us to find out if Glandex is recommended for your pet!

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Although neither Dr. Miele, nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic
or its staff can guarantee the performance of Glandex,
we invite you to discover whether its benefits are right for your pet.

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True or False: Indoor-only cats don’t need parasite prevention

FALSE.

Even cats that stay indoors their entire lives are at risk for parasitic infections. Why?

Because mosquitos, which transmit heartworm disease, often sneak into our homes.

Because fleas, which transmit tapeworms, often reside in our homes.

Because flies, which transmit roundworms, often buzz around inside our homes.

And if your cat is anything like mine, it loves to chase, catch, and eat bugs!

These are just some of the reasons your cat’s feces should be checked by the veterinarian, one or more times a year, for parasites.

It’s also why Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, recommends Revolution for indoor and outdoor cats. Revolution protects your cat against fleas, heartworms, roundworms, (and ear mites!)

Double-click the graphic below to learn more about cats and parasites — then Contact Us about protecting your indoor cat from heartworms, tapeworms, and roundworms.

Infographic on cats and parasites

Double-click to enlarge.

 

Originally published on April 16, 2015.

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Holiday schedule

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8 TIPS FOR TAKING A ROAD TRIP WITH YOUR PET

Posted on May 15, 2018 under Dog Articles on PetsBest.com

By Arden Moore, a certified dog and cat behaviorist with the International Association of Animal Behavior Consultants. Arden is an author, radio host, and writer for Pets Best, a pet insurance agency for dogs and cats.

Imagine driving for three days, staying at two hotels and covering 1,383 miles with a 60-pound dog and a meow-happy cat. And, then a week later, repeating this trek to return home. Does that sound like your dream road trip? Surprisingly, it was for me!

Latest national pet surveys indicate more than 70 percent of people take their dogs – and yes, even some travel-savvy cats – on road trips.

Photo by Vladimir Kudinov via Pexels

8 TRIED-AND-TESTED TIPS FOR ROAD TRIPPING WITH PETS
To keep your sanity and to keep your pets safe during those long hours of driving, here are 8 tried-and-tested tips. Plus, be sure to download your Pet Road Trip Checklist to help you prepare for the journey!

1. Pack with a purpose

Keep pet travel essentials in your vehicle. My must-have list include a water bowl, bottled water, extra leash and collar with identification tags, poop bags, an old towel, pre-moistened wipes, a basic first-aid kit, necessary medications, a copy of health records, bedding, treats, one or two favorite toys and at least a 3-day supply of food inside resealable plastic bags or containers.

2. Don’t be a road warrior

If you are traveling by yourself, take a break every couple of hours and check if your pets need a bathroom break or water. I limited myself to eight hours behind the wheel each day and always left an hour or two before the morning rush hour.

3. Select hotels that that don’t take a big bite out of your wallet

Book hotel stays in advance by using pet-friendly websites like BringFido.com and GoPetFriendly.com. But be sure to call the hotel directly, too. You may save a bit by booking direct.

4. Park your pet while you drive

Do not allow your dog to ride in the front passenger seat or in your lap or allow him to stick his head out the window. An unrestrained 60-pound dog becomes a 2,700-pound projectile in a sudden stop or an accident at 35 miles per hour. Depending on the size of your dog, fit him in a pet safety harnesses securely clipped into a seatbelt in the middle seats or place him inside pet carriers, also fastened in place. In our trip, my dog was harnessed in the back of the SUV and my cat was inside a well-ventilated cat carrier tethered to a seat belt in the middle seat.

5. Purchase pet insurance

Nothing takes the fun out of a vacation like an unexpected expense or injury. Treating a broken leg can cost $2,000 to $5,000. Pet insurance helps you prepare for the unexpected. The best part is that you can use any vet in the U.S. with Pets Best coverage. So if you’re just passing through and an emergency happens, you don’t have to worry about using a different veterinarian.

6. Tap into technology

With the swipe of your finger, you can obtain instant access to your pet’s medical records, locate the nearest emergency veterinary hospital and receive step-by-step audio and print instructions for pet first-aid by downloading the Pet Tech PetSaver App or other similar ones. Pets Best customers can access their policy’s included 24/7 Pet Helpline for questions and tips for keeping their pet’s healthy during road trips too!

7. Dine at odd times

Try to dine at pet-permitting restaurants and outdoor cafes during off peak times, such as mid-morning or late afternoon. Weekdays are usually quieter than weekends. Be sure to have exercised your dog with a brisk 30-minute walk before dining to help calm him down. Request a table in an out-of-the-way corner. Tether your dog’s six-foot or four-foot leash securely under one of your chair legs to keep him from disturbing other diners.

8. Paw it forward

Set a good example for the next person traveling with his or her pet. Have your dog be in a sit-stay when you check in at the front desk. Abide by the pet rules and always leave a generous tip for the housekeeping staff – especially if you have a shedding dog like mine. These gestures create a positive impression that will benefit other pet lovers.

[Bonus tip: Make sure a lost pet can be returned you by protecting him or her with a permanent microchip ID, like a HomeAgain microchip.]

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Heartworm Disease is closer than you think
— so be sure your pet is receiving a monthly heartworm preventative.

Cases of heartworm disease are tracked nationally and reported on by several organizations. One such group, the Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC), has discovered that three cities in Virginia are among the Top Ten cities in the U.S. to have experienced an increase in the number of positive heartworm cases in the past 30-45 days.

Alexandria, VA ranked #1 overall, for the highest percentage increase of positive tests in June. If that doesn’t feel close enough for pet owners in Hampton Roads, consider this: Newport News, VA was #3 and Hampton, VA was #4 on the national list!

Here is the complete Top Ten ranking:

1) Alexandria, Va.

2) Corona, Calif.

3) Newport News, Va.

4) Hampton, Va.

5) Paterson, N.J.

6) San Bernardino, Calif.

7) Fargo, N.D.

8) Springfield, Mass.

9) Laredo, Tex.

10) Topeka, Kans.

Heartworms in canine heart

Heartworm Disease is close to home in Hampton Roads, so be sure your pet is receiving a monthly heartworm preventative to protect against this deadly parasite.

Contact Us at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic for an appointment to get your pet protected today.

Link to CAPC report: https://www.petsandparasites.org/about-capc/top-ten-cities-reports/

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From the Case Files:

Did you know that dogs and cats can develop an allergy to plastic found in products such as food & water dishes and pet toys? This type of allergic reaction can lead to mild or severe irritation and sores at the lips, chin, jaw, and nose. (Other areas of the body may be affected, as well.) 

A plastic dish may not be right for your pet.

A plastic dish may not be right for your pet.

If your pet’s veterinarian suspects your pet is allergic to plastic, he or she may recommend you swap out all plastic bowls and dishes for stainless steel. You may also be instructed to remove plastic and rubber pet toys. In some cases, the veterinarian will prescribe a topical ointment to use on the affected area.

Inform the veterinarian if the problem persists or if you see signs of infection, such as pus, swelling, inflammation, or bleeding. Other causes of skin disorders include mites, fungus, bacteria, allergens, and even the body’s immune system.

Since there are numerous potential causes for sores and inflammation, check with your pet’s veterinarian to get a professional opinion on your pet’s specific case.

Questions? Contact Us to schedule an appointment for your pet.

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If you want to carry your pet’s records while you’re on-the-go, Pawprint has an app that allows you 24/7 access to your pet’s medical information.

When you download the app, Pawprint* contacts your pet’s veterinarian to request records, then uploads them to your account.

Click to enlarge.

Then you’ll be able to set reminders for vaccine boosters, flea and heartworm treatments, even daily walks.

You can add other people to the account, so your go-to pet-sitter can access your pet’s records if you have to go out of town and your pet needs medical care.

You’ll have proof of your pet’s vaccination, as close as your smartphone — which can come in handy at the groomer’s, dog park, or even the veterinary emergency hospital.

If you are a client at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, you can request that we share your pet’s records with Pawprint, or any other pet record app of your choice.

*Other similar apps may be available. 

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Note: Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or staff warranty or guarantee the service provided by Pawprint, nor are the above-named responsible for any costs incurred or damage to your electronic device as a result of downloading the app.
Always use discretion when downloading any app to your electronic device. Some software can cause harm to your device; some software incurs a fee for usage. Always research an app before you download, as you assume liability for any damage or costs incurred.

 

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