Posts Tagged ‘jaundice’

Answer: When it needs to be surgically removed from your pet.

These pennies can add up to hundreds of dollars - in emergency vet bills.

These pennies can add up to hundreds of dollars – in emergency vet bills.

As a pet owner, you may already be aware of the hazards of lead poisoning in pets. But did you know that zinc is toxic, also?

Where would my pet find zinc?  Items containing or made from zinc include metal travel cages, plumbing nuts, hardware nuts, zinc oxide ointment, game board pieces, and pennies minted after 1982.

What are the signs of zinc toxicity in a pet?  Look for vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, jaundice (yellowing of the skin and membranes), blood in the urine, and pale mucous membranes.     

How is zinc toxicity treated?  Xrays can determine the presence and location of swallowed objects, while blood and urine tests can determine the extent of injury. Removal of the objects may require endoscopy or surgery. Removal of the zinc object is necessary for recovery. Some pets will need a blood transfusion, as well. The veterinarian will determine which type of supportive care is necessary, depending on the organs affected.

What happens after that?  The veterinarian will monitor your pet’s response to treatment, especially within the first 72 hours.

Is zinc toxicity really considered an emergency?  Yes. Unless the pet receives treatment soon after ingesting the zinc object, it may suffer organ failure and a heart attack. Known or suspected zinc ingestion cases will always be sent to the local emergency hospital.

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This article originally posted February 1, 2011.

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What is liver disease?

     The liver is an important organ with many functions, including the digestion and conversion of nutrients, the removal of toxic substances from the blood and the storage of vitamins and minerals.  Liver disease results in inflammation, known as hepatitis.  If untreated, this can lead to loss of function as healthy liver cells are replaced by scar tissue.  Diseases elsewhere in the body can also affect the liver’s function.

What causes liver disease?

  • Age:  Several diseases, including liver dysfunction, are common in geriatric pets.
  • Breed:  Certain breeds, such as Dobermans, Rottweilers, Yorkies, Cocker Spaniels, and Siamese cats, are more likely to be born with or are prone to develop particular liver problems.
  • Obesity:  Cats that are severely overweight may be more likely to develop liver disease.
  • Medications and chemicals:  Medications containing acetaminophen can damage the liver in cats and dogs.
  • Bacterial and viral infections
  • Congenital abnormality

What are common signs of liver disease?

  • Poor appetite
  • Weight loss
  • Jaundice
  • Increased thirst
  • Vomiting and diarrhea
  • Changes in behavior
  • Excessive drooling

Why does the vet recommend Hill’s Prescription Diet l/d?

     Hill’s Pet Nutrition knows that the liver is designed to repair and regenerate itself, but it needs the proper nutrition* to support the process.

     Hill’s has specially formulated its l/d diet to support liver function while reducing the liver’s overall workload and allowing this complicated organ a chance to heal.  Prescription diet l/d also includes vitamins C and E to help protect delicate liver cells from more damage.

*Liver conditions may also require surgical intervention and drug treatments.  Some pets may be placed under the care of a veterinary internal medicine specialist.  Diagnostic testing is necessary to determine the type of disease or physical abnormality present and the extent of damage to the liver, which will aid in the creation of a treatment plan.  Hill’s Prescription diet l/d is one facet of the treatment plan.

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Information taken from Hill’s Pet Nutrition pamphlet “Liver Conditions,” available at our office.

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These pennies can add up to hundreds of dollars - in emergency vet bills.

 

     As a pet owner, you may already be aware of the hazards of lead poisoning in pets.  But did you know that zinc is toxic, also?

     Where would my pet find zinc?  Items containing or made from zinc include metal travel cages, plumbing nuts, hardware nuts, zinc oxide ointment, game board pieces, and pennies minted after 1982.
     What are the signs of zinc toxicity in a pet?  Look for vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, jaundice (yellowing of the skin and membranes), blood in the urine, and pale mucous membranes.
     What is the treatment?  Xrays can determine the presence and location of swallowed objects, while blood and urine tests can determine the extent of injury.  Removal of the objects may require endoscopy or surgery.  Removal of the zinc object is necessary for recovery.  Some pets will need a blood transfusion, as well.  The veterinarian will determine which type of supportive care is necessary, depending on the organs affected.
     What happens after that?  The veterinarian will monitor your pet’s response to treatment, especially within the first 72 hours.
     Is zinc toxicity really considered an emergency?  Yes.  Unless the pet receives treatment soon after ingesting the zinc object, it may suffer organ failure and a heart attack.  Known or suspected zinc ingestion cases will always be sent to the local emergency hospital.

Read Full Post »