Posts Tagged ‘holiday safety’

During the holidays, batteries abound, because so many of the gadgets we buy for ourselves and our loved ones run on AA, D-cells, 9-volts, button batteries, and more.

But if those shiny objects look like candy to your dog or cat, you could be in for a shock: batteries can cause painful burns and ulcers inside your pet and may require a special procedure to remove them if they become lodged in your pet’s body.

remote control with batteries

Has the remote become your pet’s new favorite chew toy? That could be a real problem!

Alkaline batteries, which are often used to power common items like toys, electronics, remote controls, and clocks, contain potassium hydroxide, which can destroy delicate tissues and cause ulcers if ingested. Although early signs of damage can appear within 1-2 hours, further damage can occur over the first 24 hours after contact.† This includes injury from a pet chewing the battery, but not necessarily swallowing the pieces.

Disc batteries, which power hearing aids, watches, car key fobs, greeting cards, toys, and more, are very easy for your pet to swallow whole or chew into small pieces. They can also cause burns and possibly become stuck inside your pet’s body.

As a result of chewing or eating batteries, your pet may need Xrays to locate the pieces, bloodwork to determine how his health may be affected, or a special procedure to remove the battery if it is stuck inside your pet’s body.

Along with testing and any special procedures, your pet’s doctor may prescribe pain medication, antibiotics, fluids, and special medications used to treat ulcers.

†Monitoring for further complications following battery ingestion can last as long as 6 weeks, while pets recover at home.

What you might see if your pet chews or swallows a battery:

  • grey, white, or red burns in your pet’s mouth
  • swelling inside the mouth
  • difficulty eating or swallowing food
  • drooling
  • wheezing / noisy breathing / difficulty breathing
  • vomiting
  • lethargy / reluctance to move
  • pain at the mouth or abdomen

What to do if your dog or cat chews or eats a battery:
Call your local veterinary emergency hospital or animal poison control hotline for guidance [see references below], as soon as you become aware that your pet ate or may have eaten or chewed a battery. Since injury can continue to occur for some time after the initial exposure to potassium hydroxide, immediate action is key to a good outcome. In other words — don’t wait!

Prevent battery snacking!
This holiday season — and all year-round — be mindful of the items within your curious or hungry pet’s reach.

Pets that like to dig through the trash can may chew up a greeting card or used battery they find there. Children’s animatronic stuffed animals may look similar to a pet’s chew toy and pose a danger with their batteries and stuffing.

Take an inventory of each room and try to identify the objects within your pet’s reach, that contain batteries of any type or size. You may be surprised!

Even pets that don’t have a history of eating or chewing non-food items may suddenly develop interest in a new object, according to Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian.

Bottom line: Don’t let battery ingestion be a drain on your pet’s health!

Note: This article is not a substitute for medical care. It is not meant to diagnose, treat, or cure any condition. If you believe your pet is exhibiting signs of illness or injury, contact your regular veterinarian or veterinary emergency hospital right away.


Keep these numbers handy for emergencies –
Blue Pearl Emergency [hospital] in Virginia Beach 757-499-5463
Pet Poison Helpline 1-855-764-7661 [$59 fee charged to your credit card*]
ASPCA Animal Poison Control 1-888-426-4435 [a fee may be charged to your credit card]

*This fee is current as of the date of this post.


Link: https://www.aspca.org/news/dangers-batteries-and-your-pets-what-you-should-know

 

 

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Cat under Christmas tree with gifts

Make this holiday season healthy and fun for everyone!
Photo by Jenna Hamra via Pexels.

Whether you’re decking the halls or going into hibernation mode, there are things you can do to protect your pet from holiday hazards.

Make your home safe for live-in and visiting pets with these tips and reminders.

Frostbite and snow-removal salt:

Snow and salt should be removed from your pet’s paws immediately. 

Frostbitten skin is red or gray and may slough (peel off.)

Apply warm, moist towels to thaw out frostbitten areas slowly until the skin appears flushed.

Contact your veterinarian as soon as possible for further care.

Snow removal products should be stored out of the reach of pets and small children, as the products’ toxicity varies considerably.

Golden retriever and Chrismas tree

Keep the holidays merry and bright for all your loved ones!
Photo by Leah Kelley via Pexels.

Toxic plants and holiday/winter products:

     Plants and other items associated with the winter and holiday season can be toxic to your pets.  What follows is a general guide.  Please consult your veterinarian, animal poison control, and the manufacturer for specifics.  Remember, the earlier you seek treatment, the better for your pet!

Plants:

  • poinsettia leaves and stems
  • balsam
  • pine
  • cedar
  • fir
  • holly berries and leaves
  • mistletoe, especially berries

Decorations/chemicals/other:

  • angel hair (spun glass)
  • Christmas tree preservatives
  • snow sprays, snow flock
  • tree ornaments
  • super glue
  • styrofoam
  • icicles
  • tinsel
  • crayons, paints
  • fireplace colors/salts
  • plastic model cement
  • bubbling lights (contain methylene chloride)
  • snow scenes (may contain salmonella)
  • aftershave, perfume
  • alcoholic beverages
  • chocolate
  • epoxy adhesives
  • antifreeze

Some of the above items are notable not just for their toxicity, but also for the danger they pose of intestinal blockage or severe irritation to the skin and mucous membranes. 


Keep these numbers handy for emergencies –

Blue Pearl Emergency in Virginia Beach 757-499-5463

Pet Poison Helpline  1-855-764-7661

ASPCA Animal Poison Control  1-888-426-4435


This post was originally published on December 9, 2011.

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Brrrrrrrrr…the Hampton Roads temperature roller coaster is about to take a dive, after delighting us with warm-ish weather recently. (Did you notice the bugs woke up and started flying about?)

Beginning tonight and continuing into next week, Norfolk and Virginia Beach are expected to experience temperatures below 40° F during the overnight hours. That’s pretty chilly, even with a coat on.

Make plans to bring your “outdoor” pets indoors overnight, so they can stay warm and healthy. Keep in mind that cold, dry air can irritate the lungs and worsen existing breathing problems in pets. 

Check here for more cold-weather pet safety tips.

Stay warm!

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According to the calendar, December 21st is the first day of winter.  According to my frozen fingers, winter is here.  Norfolk, Virginia is expected to experience some seriously cold weather, beginning this week. Do a favor for your dogs and cats, and bring them in at night.

Bonus: How cold is too cold for your pet?
Check out this chart from Petplan!

Dr. Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends following these tips from Purina to keep your pets safe in cold weather.

Winter Pet Care Tips from Purina  

Winter and the busy holiday can pose special risks for pets.  Help your pet to weather the winter and stay healthy and safe by following these simple tips.

  • Keep indoor pets in a dry, warm area free of drafts.  If possible, elevate your pet’s bed off the floor.
  • Bring pets inside when temperatures dip into the 50s or even the low 60s.  Otherwise, in warmer temperatures, provide outdoor pets a dry, insulated shelter out of the wind.
  • Staying warm requires extra calories, so feed your pet accordingly when the temperature drops.  Talk to your veterinarian for advice on feeding your pet.
  • Cats and kittens often nap on car engines for warmth.  Knock on the hood and honk the horn; then wait a few minutes before starting your car.
  • Pets like the smell and taste of antifreeze, but even a very small amount can kill them.  Thoroughly clean up spills at once.  Tightly close containers and store them where pets cannot get to them.
  • Always have fresh, clean water available for your pet.
  • Alcoholic beverages, holiday treats such as chocolates, and bones from poultry, pork and fish can be harmful or toxic to pets.  Keep your pet on his regular diet.
  • Many plants – including Christmas rose, holly, mistletoe, philodendron, poinsettia, and dieffenbachia – are toxic to pets.  Keep them out of your pet’s reach.
  • Remove ice, salt and caked mud from your pet’s paws and coat at once.  Contact your veterinarian immediately if you suspect your pet has frostbite.  Frostbitten skin may turn reddish, white or gray, and it may be scaly or sloughing.
  • Holiday paraphernalia can be dangerous to pets.  Cover or tack down electrical cords.  Keep tinsel and glass ornaments out of your pet’s reach.  Read warnings on items like spray-on snow.  Never put ribbons around your pet’s neck or allow it to play with plastic or foil wrappings or six-pack beverage holders.

Original post here.

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http://clipart.christiansunite.com

WINTER PET CARE TIPS FROM PURINA

Winter and the busy holiday season can pose special risks for pets.  Help your pet to weather the winter and stay healthy and safe by following these simple tips.

  • Keep indoor pets in a dry, warm area free of drafts.  If possible, elevate your pet’s bed off the floor.
  • Bring pets inside when temperatures dip into the 50s or even the low 60s.  Otherwise, in warmer temperatures, provide outdoor pets a dry, insulated shelter out of the wind.
  • Staying warm requires extra calories, so feed your pet accordingly when the temperature drops.  Talk to your veterinarian for advice on feeding your pet.
  • Cats and kittens often nap on car engines for warmth.  Knock on the hood and honk the horn; then wait a few minutes before starting your car.
  • Pets like the smell and taste of antifreeze, but even a very small amount can kill them.  Thoroughly clean up spills at once.  Tightly close containers and store them where pets cannot get to them.
  • Always have fresh, clean water available for your pet.
  • Alcoholic beverages, holiday treats such as chocolates, and bones from poultry, pork and fish can be harmful or toxic to pets.  Keep your pet on his regular diet.
  • Many plants – including Christmas rose, holly, mistletoe, philodendron, poinsettia, and dieffenbachia – are toxic to pets.  Keep them out of your pet’s reach.
  • Remove ice, salt and caked mud from your pet’s paws and coat at once.  Contact your veterinarian immediately if you suspect your pet has frostbite.  Frostbitten skin may turn reddish, white or gray, and it may be scaly or sloughing.
  • Holiday paraphernalia can be dangerous to pets.  Cover or tack down electrical cords.  Keep tinsel and glass ornaments out of your pet’s reach.  Read warnings on items like spray-on snow.  Never put ribbons around your pet’s neck or allow it to play with plastic or foil wrappings or six-pack beverage holders.

******************************************************************************************
Originally posted on December 15, 2010.
Clipart from Christians Unite.

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     Whether you’re decking the halls or going into hibernation mode, there are things you can do to protect your pet from holiday hazards.

     Make your home safe for live-in and visiting pets with these tips from Dr. Gail C. Golab.
Free-Christmas-Picture-Boy-Dog-GraphicsFairy

Frostbite and snow-removal salt:

Snow and salt should be removed from your pet’s paws immediately. 

Frostbitten skin is red or gray and may slough (peel off.)

Apply warm, moist towels to thaw out frostbitten areas slowly until the skin appears flushed.

Contact your veterinarian as soon as possible for further care.

Snow removal products should be stored out of the reach of pets and small children, as the products’ toxicity varies considerably.

 

Toxic plants and holiday/winter products:

     Plants and other items associated with the winter and holiday season can be toxic to your pets.  What follows is a general guide.  Please consult your veterinarian, animal poison control, and the manufacturer for specifics.  Remember, the earlier you seek treatment, the better for your pet!

Plants:

poinsettia leaves and stems

balsam

pine

cedar

fir

holly berries and leaves

mistletoe, especially berries 

Decorations/chemicals/other:

angel hair (spun glass)

Christmas tree preservatives

snow sprays, snow flock

tree ornaments

super glue

styrofoam

icicles

tinsel

crayons, paints

fireplace colors/salts

plastic model cement

bubbling lights (contain methylene chloride)

snow scenes (may contain salmonella)

aftershave, perfume

alcoholic beverages

chocolate

epoxy adhesives

antifreeze

     Some of the above items are notable not just for their toxicity, but also for the danger they pose of intestinal blockage or severe irritation to the skin and mucous membranes. 

Keep these numbers handy for emergencies –

BluePearl Veterinary Emergency Hospital in Virginia Beach 757-499-5463

Pet Poison Helpline  1-800-213-6680

ASPCA Animal Poison Control  1-888-426-4435
*****************************************************************************
Image from The Graphics Fairy.
This article was originally posted on December 9, 2011.

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Whether you’re decking the halls or going into hibernation mode, there are things you can do to protect your pet from holiday hazards.

Make your home safe for live-in and visiting pets with these tips from Dr. Gail C. Golab.

Frostbite and snow-removal salt:

Snow and salt should be removed from your pet’s paws immediately. 

Frostbitten skin is red or gray and may slough (peel off.)

Apply warm, moist towels to thaw out frostbitten areas slowly until the skin appears flushed.

Contact your veterinarian as soon as possible for further care.

Snow removal products should be stored out of the reach of pets and small children, as the products’ toxicity varies considerably.

Toxic plants and holiday/winter products:

     Plants and other items associated with the winter and holiday season can be toxic to your pets.  What follows is a general guide.  Please consult your veterinarian, animal poison control, and the manufacturer for specifics.  Remember, the earlier you seek treatment, the better for your pet!

Plants:

poinsettia leaves and stems

balsam

pine

cedar

fir

holly berries and leaves

mistletoe, especially berries

 

Decorations/chemicals/other:

angel hair (spun glass)

Christmas tree preservatives

snow sprays, snow flock

tree ornaments

super glue

styrofoam

icicles

tinsel

crayons, paints

fireplace colors/salts

plastic model cement

bubbling lights (contain methylene chloride)

snow scenes (may contain salmonella)

aftershave, perfume

alcoholic beverages

chocolate

epoxy adhesives

antifreeze

Some of the above items are notable not just for their toxicity, but also for the danger they pose of intestinal blockage or severe irritation to the skin and mucous membranes. 

********************************************************************************

Just in – ASPCA Animal Poison Control magnets.

ASPCA magnet

Place this reminder on your refrigerator, so you and your holiday guests will know which foods are harmful to your pets. Get one on your next visit to our clinic!

********************************************************************************

Keep these numbers handy for emergencies –

Blue Pearl Emergency in Virginia Beach 757-499-5463

Pet Poison Helpline  1-800-213-6680

ASPCA Animal Poison Control  1-888-426-4435

*********************************************************************************
This post was originally published on December 9, 2011.

Read Full Post »

     Whether you’re decking the halls or going into hibernation mode, there are things you can do to protect your pet from holiday hazards.

     Make your home safe for live-in and visiting pets with these tips from Dr. Gail C. Golab.

Frostbite and snow-removal salt:

Snow and salt should be removed from your pet’s paws immediately. 

Frostbitten skin is red or gray and may slough (peel off.)

Apply warm, moist towels to thaw out frostbitten areas slowly until the skin appears flushed.

Contact your veterinarian as soon as possible for further care.

Snow removal products should be stored out of the reach of pets and small children, as the products’ toxicity varies considerably.

 

Toxic plants and holiday/winter products:

     Plants and other items associated with the winter and holiday season can be toxic to your pets.  What follows is a general guide.  Please consult your veterinarian, animal poison control, and the manufacturer for specifics.  Remember, the earlier you seek treatment, the better for your pet!

Plants:

poinsettia leaves and stems

balsam

pine

cedar

fir

holly berries and leaves

mistletoe, especially berries

 

Decorations/chemicals/other:

angel hair (spun glass)

Christmas tree preservatives

snow sprays, snow flock

tree ornaments

super glue

styrofoam

icicles

tinsel

crayons, paints

fireplace colors/salts

plastic model cement

bubbling lights (contain methylene chloride)

snow scenes (may contain salmonella)

aftershave, perfume

alcoholic beverages

chocolate

epoxy adhesives

antifreeze

     Some of the above items are notable not just for their toxicity, but also for the danger they pose of intestinal blockage or severe irritation to the skin and mucous membranes. 

Keep these numbers handy for emergencies –

Pet ICU in Virginia Beach 757-499-5463

Pet Poison Helpline  1-800-213-6680

ASPCA Animal Poison Control  1-888-426-4435

 

Read Full Post »

     According to the calendar, December 22nd is the first day of winter.  According to my frozen fingers, winter is here.  Do your dogs and cats a favor, and bring them in at night.

  Winter Pet Care Tips from Purina  

     Winter and the busy holiday can pose special risks for pets.  Help your pet to weather the winter and stay healthy and safe by following these simple tips.

  • Keep indoor pets in a dry, warm area free of drafts.  If possible, elevate your pet’s bed off the floor.
  • Bring pets inside when temperatures dip into the 50s or even the low 60s.  Otherwise, in warmer temperatures, provide outdoor pets a dry, insulated shelter out of the wind.
  • Staying warm requires extra calories, so feed your pet accordingly when the temperature drops.  Talk to your veterinarian for advice on feeding your pet.
  • Cats and kittens often nap on car engines for warmth.  Knock on the hood and honk the horn; then wait a few minutes before starting your car.
  • Pets like the smell and taste of antifreeze, but even a very small amount can kill them.  Thoroughly clean up spills at once.  Tightly close containers and store them where pets cannot get to them.
  • Always have fresh, clean water available for your pet.
  • Alcoholic beverages, holiday treats such as chocolates, and bones from poultry, pork and fish can be harmful or toxic to pets.  Keep your pet on his regular diet.
  • Many plants – including Christmas rose, holly, mistletoe, philodendron, poinsettia, and dieffenbachia – are toxic to pets.  Keep them out of your pet’s reach.
  • Remove ice, salt and caked mud from your pet’s paws and coat at once.  Contact your veterinarian immediately if you suspect your pet has frostbite.  Frostbitten skin may turn reddish, white or gray, and it may be scaly or sloughing.
  • Holiday paraphernalia can be dangerous to pets.  Cover or tack down electrical cords.  Keep tinsel and glass ornaments out of your pet’s reach.  Read warnings on items like spray-on snow.  Never put ribbons around your pet’s neck or allow it to play with plastic or foil wrappings or six-pack beverage holders.

Original post.

 

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