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Posts Tagged ‘Hill’s Prescription Diet’

National Pet Dental Health Month

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Q: Do dogs wear braces?
A: For some dogs, braces are necessary to straighten the teeth enough so the dog’s mouth opens and closes correctly. Orthodontics work can vary from limited work on a few teeth to a full set of braces. However, most dogs are born with sufficiently straight teeth to allow them to chew without problems.

Q: My dog shows a ridge-like wear on its canine teeth. What causes this?
A: Wear patterns show up from repeated chewing. The ridge-like wear you describe could be attributed to chewing on a chain-link fence. Dogs that are left alone in backyards may chew on fences because they are bored, scared, frustrated or for other reasons. The best solution is to keep the dog and the fence away from each other.

Q: Does it matter whether my pet eats hard or soft food?
A: Studies show that hard kibbles are slightly better at keeping plaque from accumulating on the teeth. Currently, there is a separate product for dogs and cats that has been proven to reduce plaque and tartar. If you think your pet needs a special food, consult your family veterinarian.

Q: Will my pet suffer if I don’t take care of its teeth and gums?
A: Gum disease can cause pets pain and serious dental problems later in life, as well as possibly lead to more serious illnesses, such as heart and kidney disease. But gum disease can be prevented. By beginning early in your pet’s life to care for its teeth, you can spare your pet the discomfort caused by gum disease.

Q: How can a professional teeth cleaning by a veterinarian help my pet?
A: A professional dental cleaning will remove plaque, stain and tartar encrusted above and below the gumline, restoring your dog’s [and cat’s] teeth to a clean and polished condition, and removing the bacteria that can cause gum disease.

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These questions and answers taken from “Dr. Logan answers your frequently asked questions” 
http://www.petdental.com/html/body_2a_faq.htm (expired link)

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Can cats and dogs develop diabetes?

The answer is – YES. Cats and dogs can develop diabetes. Luckily, treatment is available.

Diabetes 010

What is diabetes?

Diabetes mellitus is a condition in which the body either does not produce enough insulin (Type I) or is unable to effectively use the insulin it does produce (Type II). In either case, serious health disturbances result.

Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, necessary for processing blood sugar (glucose). Without insulin, blood sugar passes into the urine, rather than being used by body tissues.

When body tissues are starved for sugar, they begin to break down and no longer function normally, resulting in:

  • cataracts
  • skin sores and infections
  • urinary and respiratory infections
  • pancreatitis
  • neuropathy
  • vomiting and dehydration
  • coma and death

The kidneys, liver, heart, and nervous system can also suffer as a result of diabetes.

Type I diabetes is also known as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and is often seen in older, overweight female dogs and in cats.

Type II diabetes, also known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) is often seen in cats, but is rare in dogs.

What signs should I look for in my pet?

  • excessive thirst and urination
  • weight loss
  • poor appetite
  • weakness, inactivity
  • vomiting
  • dandruff and unkempt appearance (scruffy coat)
  • muscle wasting
  • plantigrade stance in cats (see photo)
Click to enlarge. Photo by Jennifer Miele.

Click to enlarge. Photo by Jennifer Miele.

What causes diabetes?

  • genetic predisposition
  • viral infection
  • pancreatitis and other diseases
  • hormone-type drugs
  • obesity

Is there a cure?
No, diabetes is not curable, but it can be controlled.

What kind of treatment is available?
Insulin injections and a specialized diet are indicated for Type I diabetes. You will learn how to give your pet its insulin injections at home. You may also need to monitor its blood sugar and urine sugar levels.

Type II diabetic patients may require a specialized diet and feeding schedule, along with blood sugar monitoring.

Nearly all diabetic patients require some amount of exercise, and female patients should be spayed to prevent hormone fluctuations from disturbing blood sugar levels.

As for diet, low carbohydrate, low fat, high fiber, high protein diets work best. Your pet’s veterinarian or vet specialist will recommend a suitable diet to manage glucose levels and weight. Hill’s Pet Nutrition has formulated m/d, r/d, and w/d to address various issues concerning diabetic dogs and cats.

Will pet insurance help me manage the cost of treatment?
Yes.*  In fact Veterinary Pet Insurance reported in 2010 that its fifth most common health claim for cats was diabetes. In 2011, diabetes dropped to number six on the list, but still represented a large number of claims.
*Important: if your pet is diagnosed with diabetes before you sign up for pet insurance, it is considered a pre-existing condition and may not be covered. Pet health insurance is best started when your pet is young and healthy.

Note: The information above is a partial explanation of diabetes, its symptoms, and treatment. There are other types of diabetes that are not mentioned here.
This article is not a substitute for medical care. It is not meant to diagnose or treat any condition. If you believe your pet has an illness, schedule an appointment with your veterinarian today.

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Resources:
Hill’s Pet Nutrition publication
Instructions for Veterinary Clients
Saunders Comprehensive Veterinary Dictionary
Saunders Manual of Small Animal Practice
The 5 Minute Veterinary Consult

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This post originally appeared on October 10, 2012.

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Dr. Miele will be on break from
Wednesday, May 6th through Saturday, May 9th.

The clinic will be closed during those dates, so please ensure you have
enough of your pet’s medications and prescription diets on hand.

Food orders must be placed by May 1st and picked up by May 5th.

Medication refill orders must be placed by May 1st
and picked up by May 5th.
Medications requested after May 1st may not be available
after the cut-off date, due to our vendor ordering and delivery restrictions.

Dr. Miele will return for regular office hours on Monday, May 11th.

Sicily 2 045

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Yippee! We received a shipment of Temptations Cat Treats to give FREE to our cat-loving clients! 

P1060078

Naturally, when the goodies arrived, they had to be inspected. In fact, you could say they received a cat scan.

Josie exercising due diligence.

Josie exercising due diligence.

Temptations Treats, as their name suggests, are hard to resist — even for extremely disciplined and well-trained cats. Ahem.

"No one will notice if I take just one..."

“No one will notice if I take just one…”

So grab a handful of FREE Temptations Cat Treats on your next swing by our clinic – your cats will thank you!

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Notice to our Hill’s Prescription Diet users:

Hill’s is increasing their food prices beginning February 1st.

We still have food in stock at the 2012 prices, so be sure to claim a bag or case before they sell out!

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The answer is – YES. Dogs and cats can develop diabetes. Luckily, treatment is available.

What is diabetes?

Diabetes mellitus is a condition in which the body either does not produce enough insulin (Type I) or is unable to effectively use the insulin it does produce (Type II). In either case, serious health disturbances result.

Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas, necessary for processing blood sugar (glucose). Without insulin, blood sugar passes into the urine, rather than being used by body tissues.

When body tissues are starved for sugar, they begin to break down and no longer function normally, resulting in:

  • cataracts
  • skin sores and infections
  • urinary and respiratory infections
  • pancreatitis
  • neuropathy
  • vomiting and dehydration
  • coma and death

The kidneys, liver, heart, and nervous system can also suffer as a result of diabetes.

Type I diabetes is also known as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) and is often seen in older, overweight female dogs and in cats.

Type II diabetes, also known as non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) is often seen in cats, but is rare in dogs.

What signs should I look for in my pet?

  • excessive thirst and urination
  • weight loss
  • poor appetite
  • weakness, inactivity
  • vomiting
  • dandruff and unkempt appearance (scruffy coat)
  • muscle wasting
  • plantigrade stance in cats (see photo)

    Click to enlarge. Photo by Jennifer Miele.

What causes diabetes?

  • genetic predisposition
  • viral infection
  • pancreatitis and other diseases
  • hormone-type drugs
  • obesity

Is there a cure?
No, diabetes is not curable, but it can be controlled.

What kind of treatment is available?
Insulin injections and a specialized diet are indicated for Type I diabetes. You will learn how to give your pet its insulin injections at home. You may also need to monitor its blood sugar and urine sugar levels.

Type II diabetic patients may require a specialized diet and feeding schedule, along with blood sugar monitoring.

Nearly all diabetic patients require some amount of exercise, and female patients should be spayed to prevent hormone fluctuations from disturbing blood sugar levels.

As for diet, low carbohydrate, low fat, high fiber, high protein diets work best. Your pet’s veterinarian or vet specialist will recommend a suitable diet to manage glucose levels and weight. Hill’s Pet Nutrition has formulated m/d, r/d, and w/d to address various issues concerning diabetic dogs and cats.

Will pet insurance help me manage the cost of treatment?
Yes.*  In fact Veterinary Pet Insurance reported in 2010 that its fifth most common health claim for cats was diabetes. In 2011, diabetes dropped to number six on the list, but still represented a large number of claims.
*Important: if your pet is diagnosed with diabetes before you sign up for pet insurance, it is considered a pre-existing condition and may not be covered. Pet health insurance is best started when your pet is young and healthy.

Note: The information above is a partial explanation of diabetes, its symptoms, and treatment. There are other types of diabetes that are not mentioned here.
This article is not a substitute for medical care. It is not meant to diagnose or treat any condition. If you believe your pet has an illness, schedule an appointment with your veterinarian today.

*******************************************************************
Resources:
Hill’s Pet Nutrition publication
Instructions for Veterinary Clients
Saunders Comprehensive Veterinary Dictionary
Saunders Manual of Small Animal Practice
The 5 Minute Veterinary Consult

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     By now, you’ve likely seen the news involving the expanding recalls of pet foods manufactured by Diamond. It’s enough to make people wonder whether other brands of food are affected, as well.

     The makers of Hill’s Science Diet and Prescription Diet foods has addressed pet owner concerns in a letter, published below. We have carried Hill’s Prescription Diet foods for our patients for over twenty years and can report that the company has numerous food safety controls in place. It stands behind its product, so that you can feed your pet without worry.

Click to enlarge

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What are heart conditions?

     The heart is the most important organ in your pet’s body. It pumps blood containing oxygen and nutrients through the blood vessels to the cells of the body. Most heart conditions involve a decrease in the effective pumping of blood. This can lead to a buildup of fluid in the chest and abdomen.

What are the two main heart conditions?

     Chronic valvular disease: A leaking heart valve reduces the quantity of blood that can be pumped around the body. More common in dogs.

     Myocardial disease: In this condition, weakness or thickening of the heart muscle results in the heart pumping less efficiently. More common in cats.

What causes heart conditions? 
These are a few contributors:

  • Age: Heart conditions in pets occur more frequently with increasing age.
  • Body condition: Overweight cats and dogs are more likely to develop heart disease.
  • Breed: In dogs, chronic valvular disease is more common in small breeds like miniature poodles, cocker spaniels, Pomeranians and Schnauzers. Myocardial disease is more common in large and giant breeds like Great Danes and Irish Wolfhounds. In cats, Persian, Maine Coon and American shorthair breeds seem more likely to suffer from myocardial disease.

What are common signs of heart disease?

  • Tired, lack of energy
  • Fainting or collapsing
  • Reduced ability to exercise
  • Breathing difficulties (dyspnea)
  • Frequent coughing
  • Reduced appetite, weight loss
  • Abdominal swelling
  • Partial paralysis of the hind leg (cats)

Why does the vet recommend Hill’s Prescription Diet?

     Hill’s h/d has low sodium, to lower the workload on the heart by reducing fluid retention in the body, and it contains taurine and L-Carnitine to support heart function.  Added nutrients replenish those lost through the use of diuretics.

     Hill’s g/d and k/d have controlled sodium levels to maintain normal blood pressure, appropriate for pets in the early stages of a heart condition.
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Information taken from Hill’s Pet Nutrition pamphlet “Heart Health,” available at our clinic.

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