Posts Tagged ‘heartworms’

When the air warms up, dogs and their people head to the dog park for exercise and socializing. Let’s keep it fun for everyone!

Here are seven steps you can take to help your pet have a safe, happy season at the dog park:

  1. Keep your dog current on its vaccinations. Bacterial and viral diseases can be spread through direct contact with other dogs; through contact with contaminated objects; and through contact with other dogs’ feces.
  2. Protect your pet against fleas, ticks, and heartworms with easy-to-give monthly preventatives. Just because another dog brings fleas to the park, that doesn’t mean your dog has to bring them home!
  3. Get your pet’s stool tested for intestinal parasites several extra times a year. Monthly preventatives protect against many kinds of intestinal parasites, but no single product provides complete protection against everything out there.
  4. Know how to recognize signs of aggression — whether in your dog or another — and be sure to remove your pet before things get dangerous. Check out these body language cues that warn of impending trouble: https://littlecreekvet.com/2014/05/20/dog-bite-prevention-2014/
  5. Train your pet to respond to your commands, such as Come, Sit, Stay, and Leave It. Knowing these basic commands can help your pet get out of a danger zone when you call him.
  6. Check the posted dog park rules. Some parks segregate dogs by size or have other rules. These rules are for the safety of all dogs using the park — including your own.
  7. If your dog is fearful and does not wish to socialize, don’t force it. She may be happiest just hanging out with you — and that’s perfectly fine!

BONUS — Learn more about dog park safety on Little Creek Veterinary Clinic’s blog: https://littlecreekvet.com/2016/06/28/dog-park-mishaps/

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April is Heartworm Awareness Month, so at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, we’re making sure you have the information you need to keep your pet protected year-round.

Here are the Top Six Heartworm Tall Tails — read the myths, then click the infographic to get the facts.

Myth #1: Dogs catch heartworms from other dogs.

Myth #2: Heartworms are only transmitted in the summer.

Myth #3: Cats don’t get heartworm disease.

Myth #4: My indoor cat doesn’t need heartworm prevention.

Myth #5: My dog is on heartworm preventive, so he doesn’t need to be tested.

Myth #6: Heartworm prevention isn’t worth it.

Now, double-click the image to learn the truth!

Brought to you by PennVet and the American Heartworm Society.

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Reminder: If your pet is not on a heartworm preventative, it could end up with juvenile heartworms swimming through its bloodstream and traveling to the lungs and heart.

At Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, we filmed these two young heartworms in a patient’s blood sample (seen under magnification):

Click for fullscreen view

Dogs and cats can be protected from heartworm disease with a monthly dose of prescription heartworm preventative.

Heartworm disease is spread by mosquitoes and is a year-round problem — think of the occasional warm days we experience each winter, which is enough to send hungry mosquitoes searching for a meal.

Contact Us to learn how to get your pet protected today.

The alternative to prevention just isn’t pretty. Here’s proof:

[Warning: Sensitive content ahead]

 

 

(more…)

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Are you wondering whether it’s okay to pause your pet’s intestinal worm protection during the chilly winter months?

Don’t do it! Worms can be found in the cozy, warm intestines of dogs and cats, even during the winter, and their eggs can be deposited into soil where your pet might pick them up. Fleas and houseflies are also carriers of intestinal parasites, like Tapeworms and Roundworms, respectively.

Dr. Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, discovered eggs of Tapeworms, Roundworms, Hookworms, and Whipworms in the stool samples of numerous patients over the past month. Take a look at what we’re finding in cats and dogs this winter:

Click any photo to enlarge for detail.
All photos taken at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic
(Norfolk, VA) under microscope.




If your pet has been off its heartworm / intestinal worm protection this winter, Contact Us to request a parasite screening as the first step to getting your pet protected again.

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Attention Users of Feline Revolution: The free dose program has ended and has been replaced with a new purchase rewards program.

For every 3 doses purchased, you can earn points which convert to dollars, which are loaded onto a prepaid VISA card, once you’ve reached a minimum of 100 points (= $10). See program FAQs here.

Buy 6 doses, earn $15

Buy 9 doses, earn $25 

Buy 12 doses, earn $35

Registration is FREE. Sign up here:  https://www.zoetispetcare.com/rewards/offers/revolution

 

Why Revolution? We asked Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic:

Revolution is safe to use on cats and is especially recommended for those that venture outdoors. Your “outdoor” cat is exposed to more natural pests than a cat that stays inside.

But remember: certain pests, like mosquitoes and fleas, can easily migrate indoors, exposing your “indoor” cats to heartworms and tapeworms. And certain pests, like houseflies and cockroaches, can carry roundworms, exposing any pet that likes to eat bugs.

Also, cats that go outside can bring ear mites and intestinal worms indoors and share them with the homebodies.

Revolution protects your indoor and outdoor cats against:

Revolution is available to your 5-15 lb cat by prescription only. To schedule an appointment, Contact Us today.

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Time to check for heartworm disease!
Schedule your pet’s yearly checkup today!

Prevent Heartworm

It’s March—Springtime is around the corner! Worms in your garden…and worms in your pet? Eeew! Hold on, let’s explain…

The worms you find in your garden mulch are not the same worms that cause heartworm disease in pets. Mosquitoes carry heartworms. And all it takes is one mosquito to bite your pet to become infected.

Here’s the good news about heartworm disease: It’s an illness that can be easy and affordable to prevent. The bad news is, if you don’t prevent it the right way, your pet is at high risk of getting sick. Heartworm disease is dangerous to your pet and some signs of the illness are tough to spot. Your pet may be acting fine, but they may have so many heartworms inside their body that it can become life threatening.

You may be thinking, “my pet stays indoors, so there’s no need for heartworm prevention.” But, Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, warns that heartworms are carried by mosquitoes, which get into everyone’s homes! One mosquito bite is all that’s needed to spread the disease to your furry friend.

Schedule your pet’s yearly checkup with us. We’ll do a thorough exam, including a simple heartworm test, to make sure your pet is at his/her optimum health. And we’ll talk about the best way to prevent heartworm disease, so your pet stays healthy, happy and safe!

Make an appointment for your pet’s annual exam today! Contact Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

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Heartworm Disease has been found in pets in all 50 states, including Virginia.

Dogs and cats are vulnerable to Heartworm Disease, which is transmitted by mosquitoes. As anyone who is familiar with southern Virginia knows, we have a mosquito problem. As a result, we also have a heartworm problem.

Heartworms not only live in the pet’s heart, they also migrate to the lungs. And although a dog can harbor over a hundred worms in its body, it takes only a single adult worm to cause a fatal inflammatory reaction in a cat.

Fast Facts:

Adult Heartworms can grow up to 12 inches long

Adult Heartworms can live 5-7 years

A dog can have as many as 250 worms in its body

You can protect your pet with a simple-to-use monthly preventative, such as HeartGard Plus or Revolution.

Contact Us so we can help you get your pet protected from Heartworm Disease.
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