Posts Tagged ‘first aid’

March 17th – 23rd is National Poison Prevention Week

The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center has created this infographic to help you inspect your house, room by room, to remove dangers from your pet’s reach.

Tip: this same guide can be used to child-proof your home, as well.

 

Double-click to enlarge

Related: Build a First Aid Kit for Pet Poison Emergencies

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With daily high temperatures in the 80s and 90s,
it’s time for a reminder on how to prevent deadly heat stroke in pets.

Let your dog chill out this summer!

Let your dog chill out this summer!

Heat Stroke in Pets

Do you know how to protect your pets from heat stroke during the muggy days of summer?  This goes beyond the usual caveat of “never leave your pet in a car while you go shopping, babysit, attend a sporting event, spy on your girlfriend, etc.  Here are some tips to keep your pet safe in the yard or out and about:

  • Keep pets indoors as much as possible, especially if they are sluggish or panting soon after going outdoors.
  • Limit exercise to brief walks in the coolest parts of the day.  Keep in mind that hot pavement and sand can burn pets’ paws.
  • Provide plenty of cool water.  Check water throughout the day, as it can become hot if left outdoors. 
  • Kennels and pens should have good ventilation and air circulation and should be kept in shaded areas.

Here’s a super-cool idea: Check your dog into Happy Tails Resort
in Norfolk and let her enjoy the indoor swimming pool and play area!

Warning Signs of Heat Stroke or Heat Stress

Your pet may need emergency assistance if it exhibits any of the following signs:

  • Excessive panting and drooling
  • Bright red gums
  • Balance problems
  • Lethargy
  • Staring or anxious expression
  • Labored breathing
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Failure to respond to commands
  • High fever
  • Collapse

What To Do

Lower your pet’s body temperature by easing him into a cool (not freezing) bath.  Water from the outdoor hose may be hot, so that may not be your best option.  

Bring your pet indoors and place him in a tub, taking care to keep his mouth and nose above water [we use stacks of towels to accomplish this.] 

Apply ice packs to his head and neck. 

Call your veterinarian for further instructions.  In most cases, your pet will be hospitalized for treatment and observation.  By necessity, this sort of care may take place at the 24-hour emergency hospital.

Who Is At Risk of Heat Stroke?

Any pet can have heat stroke, but some are more susceptible than others. All pets need to be protected on hot days.  However, these pets are more likely than others to have a problem:

  • Very young and older pets
  • Short-nosed/pug-nosed breeds
  • Overweight pets
  • Pets with cardiovascular or respiratory disorders
  • Pets with a previous history of heat stress

Heat stroke is a life-threatening emergency.  If you suspect your pet has heat stroke, we recommend taking him to the nearest emergency hospital for comprehensive care.

[Information borrowed from “Summer Pet Tips” by Ralston Purina Company and “Summer Safety Tips” by Firstline magazine.]

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This article was originally published on July 28, 2010.

Photo credit: By Leif Skoogfors (This image is from the FEMA Photo Library.) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

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Over the past couple of weeks, we’ve been talking about what you should do in the event of a pet poisoning emergency. (Click the links to refresh your memory.)

Today, we’ll hit upon a topic that likely has many people confused: if a pet ingests a toxic substance, should the pet be made to vomit in order to rid its body of the toxin?

Here is what the experts at Pet Poison Helpline and Veterinary Pet Insurance want you to know:

  • If your pet is already showing signs of poisoning, it’s too late to induce vomiting.
  • If your pet has certain medical problems (like laryngeal paralysis or brachycephalic syndrome), inducing vomiting is not recommended and can make your pet’s condition worse.
  • Certain toxins (such as corrosive cleaners and hydrocarbons such as gasoline, paint thinners and kerosene) should NOT be brought back up. Inducing vomiting after the ingestion of these products may ultimately cause more harm than good.

The smartest thing you can do in the event of a suspected poisoning is to call the Pet Poison Helpline (855-764-7661) for advice and then take your pet to the nearest pet emergency hospital.

Est. 1973Coming Thursday:  If your pet throws up this chemical, it can be deadly to people.

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If your pet ingests a toxic substance, your first move should be to call the Pet Poison Helpline.

Veterinary experts at the Pet Poison Helpline (PPH) will tell you what to do in the event of a poisoning incident.

But it’s important to be prepared with the tools you’ll need in order to follow instructions given by PPH. In some cases, you will be instructed to take your pet straight to the nearest emergency hospital, without inducing vomiting or feeding anything else to your pet. But in certain cases, you will be instructed to prepare your pet for emergency care.

In that event, you should have the following items on hand, in case they are needed:

  • Hydrogen peroxide 3% (non-expired)
  • Liquid dishwashing detergent (such as Palmolive or Dawn)
  • Rubber gloves
  • Triple antibiotic ointment (such as Dermalone or Neosporin)
  • Vitamin E oil or capsules
  • Diphenhydramine liquid or 25 mg tablets (such as Benadryl), with no other combination ingredients
  • Can of tuna packed in water; chicken broth; or some type of tasty canned pet food
  • Corn syrup

Here’s another tip to keep you from scrambling in an emergency: Program your phone with the numbers of the nearest pet emergency hospital (such as Blue Pearl 757-499-5463) and Pet Poison Helpline (1-855-289-0358).

Est. 1973

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Tips taken from “Preventing Pet Poisoning Emergencies” by Pet Poison Helpline and Veterinary Pet Insurance

Check our blog for more tips on handling pet poisoning emergencies in the coming weeks!

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Veterinary Pet Insurance and Pet Poison Helpline have teamed up to bring you resources and information to help you in a pet poisoning emergency.

Know what to do! If you suspect your pet has ingested a harmful substance, contact a local pet emergency hospital, such as Blue Pearl at 757-499-5463, or call Pet Poison Helpline at 1-855-289-0358 any time, day or night. The Pet Poison Helpline will bill your credit card a one-time, per-incident fee of $39.

Gather the right information! Have this information ready when calling:

  • What your pet ingested and when
  • How much of the substance your pet ingested (how many pills, what milligram strength; how many ounces of chocolate, etc)
  • Pet’s current weight
  • Pet’s medical history, any medications or supplements

Get the app! Purchase a Pet Poison Helpline app at the iTunes App Store for only $1.99, for your iPhone, and get access to information that can help save your pet’s life.

Emergency assistance at your fingertips!

Emergency assistance at your fingertips!

Get the app from the iTunes store.

Get the app from the iTunes store.

 

Coming Thursday: Pack a First Aid Kit for pet poisoning emergencies. We’ll tell you how.

On Facebook: Watch for the Pet Poison Helpline Top Ten lists this week and next.

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There’s the punchline; you provide the joke.

And speaking of links, we present a round-up of pet-related sites from across the Web.

Four Paws Outer Wear  —  Classic dog sweaters for the well-dressed dog.

Pawz Dog Boots  —  Because sweaters always look cuter with boots!

Meet Sophie  —  A fictional story based on a real dog.

Pet Life Radio  —  “The #1 pet radio on the planet!”

Rainbow Bridge  —  Pet loss grief and support center online.

Tails From Beyond  —  “True stories of our immortal pets.”

Walks ‘N’ Wags  —  Get your Pet First Aid certificate here.

Est. 1973

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