Posts Tagged ‘first aid for pets’

If your dog or cat has an emergency,
will you know what to do before you
take your pet to the veterinary hospital?

 

You can learn CPR and First Aid for cats and dogs at a class held November 24th in Williamsburg, VA (details and link below).

WHAT: Pet Emergency Education presents Canine and Feline CPR and First Aid Certification Class

WHEN: Sunday, November 24, 2019 from 1:30 – 4:30 PM

WHERE: James City County Library, 7770 Croaker Rd., Cosby Room, Williamsburg

COST: $69.95 up to $138.95, depending on level of registration

“Pre-registration required and ends 7 days prior to the class”

REGISTER HERE and learn details of the subjects covered in class

Note from Pet Emergency Education: “Although emergency first aid can improve the outcome of an animal that is experiencing a medical emergency, our company and our instructors will recommend that owners/caregivers seek veterinary care in all instances.”

Disclaimer: This post is provided for informational purposes. Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff are associated with this event and, as such, do not offer any guarantee or warranty on this class, its contents, or any outcomes as a result of attending this class.

Always check the event status for cancellations or rescheduling. 

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Pool time by Leif Skoogfors

Keep your pet cool this summer!

Heat Stroke in Pets

Do you know how to protect your pets from heat stroke during the muggy days of summer?  This goes beyond the usual caveat of “never leave your pet in a car while you go shopping, babysit, attend a sporting event, spy on your girlfriend, etc.  Here are some tips to keep your pet safe in the yard or out and about:

  • Keep pets indoors as much as possible, especially if they are sluggish or panting soon after going outdoors.
  • Limit exercise to brief walks in the coolest parts of the day.  Keep in mind that hot pavement and sand can burn pets’ paws.
  • Provide plenty of cool water.  Check water throughout the day, as it can become hot if left outdoors. 
  • Kennels and pens should have good ventilation and air circulation and should be kept in shaded areas.

Warning Signs of Heat Stroke or Heat Stress

Your pet may need emergency assistance if it exhibits any of the following signs:

  • Excessive panting and drooling
  • Bright red gums
  • Balance problems
  • Lethargy
  • Staring or anxious expression
  • Labored breathing
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Failure to respond to commands
  • High fever
  • Collapse

What To Do

Lower your pet’s body temperature by easing him into a cool (not freezing) bath.  Water from the outdoor hose may be hot, so that may not be your best option.  

Bring your pet indoors and place him in a tub, taking care to keep his mouth and nose above water [we use stacks of towels to accomplish this.] 

Apply ice packs to his head and neck

Call your veterinarian for further instructions.  In most cases, your pet will be hospitalized for treatment and observation.  By necessity, this sort of care may take place at the 24-hour emergency hospital.

Who Is At Risk of Heat Stroke?

Any pet can have heat stroke, but some are more susceptible than others. All pets need to be protected on hot days.  However, these pets are more likely than others to have a problem:

  • Very young and older pets
  • Short-nosed/pug-nosed breeds
  • Overweight pets
  • Pets with cardiovascular or respiratory disorders
  • Pets with a previous history of heat stress

Heat stroke is a life-threatening emergency.  If you suspect your pet has heat stroke, we recommend taking him to the nearest emergency hospital for comprehensive care.

[Information borrowed from “Summer Pet Tips” by Ralston Purina Company and “Summer Safety Tips” by Firstline magazine.]

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This article was originally published on July 28, 2010.

Photo credit: By Leif Skoogfors (This image is from the FEMA Photo Library.) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

 

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     Still not sure whether a HomeAgain microchip ID is right for your pet?

     Consider this – each new microchip registration comes with a one-year membership with full benefits, including:

  • 24/7 Lost Pet Specialists, ready to serve you
  • Rapid Lost Pet Alerts sent to area veterinarians and shelters
  • Medical Insurance for lost pets (up to $2950; must be activated by pet owner)
  • Personalized Lost Pet Posters, to help you spread the word
  • 24/7 Emergency Medical Hotline – first aid advice when you need it
  • Travel assistance up to $500* to get your pet home (*applies to airfare costs for pets located more than 500 miles from home)
     After the first year, you decide whether to continue your membership benefits.
     Either way, your pet will be permanently enrolled in HomeAgain’s database – and there is no additional yearly cost simply to remain enrolled.
See also: 
 

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     If your pet has a medical emergency, are you prepared to authorize treatment which can run into the hundreds or thousands of dollars? Would you care if you never recouped any of the cost? Or is there a chance you, like many others, may opt for euthanasia if the cost of treatment is out of reach? Maybe it’s time to consider pet health insurance.

     Pet health insurance is like a forced savings account for medical emergencies. You pay a monthly premium, secure in the knowledge the policy will be there for your pet in an emergency, all the while hoping nothing bad ever happens. But bad things do happen, even to good pets.  

     Residents of Virginia can choose from among six state-approved insurance companies. I recommend stopping by our office to pick up their brochures so you can keep track of the companies as you research them. For now, here are the six:

     One way in which pet insurance differs from human health insurance is expected payment. In a human health setting, it is common practice for a doctor to bill the insurance company first and then bill the patient for the remainder. In a pet health setting, the pet owner may be required to pay the full cost of service upon check-out. At our office, full payment is required at the time of service. We then file your claim for you (there is no fee for filing) and the insurance company reimburses you directly.     

     Part of preparedness in an emergency is knowing what is expected of you financially. Pet insurance can certainly help put money back into your bank account after an emergency, but depending on hospital policy, it may not be a magical elixir you can use to pay your bills at check-out. Because of this, I recommend you check with the local emergency hospital so you’ll know whether full payment is expected at the time of service or whether they will file the insurance claim first. Do not be surprised if it is the former.

     Only you can decide if pet health insurance is a wise investment. I can offer that I have witnessed cases in which I was happy to see that a client had pet insurance and cases where it was a shame they did not. In every case, the money was spent – but only the clients whose pets were insured recovered some of that cost.  ~~  Jen

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This article was originally posted on August 16, 2010.

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     Every home should have a first aid kit for people. But pet owners should have a second kit for their furry family members. You can put together your own kit (using a watertight container) with these items:

  • Veterinarian’s contact information
  • ER veterinary clinic contact information
  • Scissors
  • Tweezers
  • Gloves
  • Gauze pads
  • Gauze rolls
  • Soft muzzle
  • Alcohol prep pads
  • Cold pack
  • Digital thermometer
  • Hydrogen peroxide
  • Rags or rubber tubing
  • Blanket or towel

    VPI (Veterinary Pet Insurance) provides these tips on knowing how to respond in an emergency:

     “Survey, Secure, Stat! While it’s important not to self-diagnose your pet’s symptoms, you must first determine the situation. Next, stabilize your pet, then take him to the veterinarian, who will want to know what happened and when, and if your pet is feeling worse, better or the same since the incident occurred.”

     Note that First Aid does not mean you provide all the medical care at home in a true emergency. However, there are occasions, such as in heat stroke or burns, where some home treatment is necessary to stabilize the pet in order to transport him safely to the hospital. In the case of burns, VPI recommends this procedure:

Survey: Burns
              Your pet’s skin has obvious signs of burns, or he has ingested a toxin and is drooling, pawing at his mouth or swallowing excessively.

Secure:  Restrain your pet. Flush burns with cold water or apply a wash cloth cooled with ice water.

Stat!:  Go to the clinic within the hour, or immediately if electrocution was the source of injury. Bring the [responsible] chemical agent with you, if possible.

     These tips and more are available at our clinic in a brochure by VPI entitled “First Aid for Your Pet.”

Need to Know Now:

Tidewater Animal Emergency and Referral Center…….757-499-5463

Pet Poison Helpline……………………………………………….1-800-213-6680

www.petinsurance.com/healthzone ………….Learn how to take your pet’s temperature and what is considered normal or abnormal temperature range.

Suggested reading:

The First Aid Companion for Dogs and Cats

First Aid for Dogs

Pet First Aid:  Cats and Dogs  

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