Posts Tagged ‘Feliway’

Cats are notorious at hiding pain. The little troupers just keep going until they can’t go anymore. But you can spot pain in your elusive cat and bring it to your veterinarian’s attention.

Look for these telltale signs of pain in your cat:

  • Your cat is hiding more often 
  • Your cat does not jump up on counters, beds, or other furniture anymore
  • Your cat avoids using the litterbox
  • Your cat shows a decrease in appetite
  • Your cat does not groom itself and it may not let you groom it, either
  • Your cat is grouchy; it may even turn to bite you if you touch it on the back
  • Your cat may flatten its ears back
  • Your cat may sit in a crouched or hunched position

The signs listed above may signal arthritis pain or some other problem, so a trip to the doctor is called for.

Less-stress tips on getting your cat to the vet’s office. 

If the doctor suspects arthritis, he may recommend supplementing your cat’s diet with fish oil capsules, which contain natural anti-inflammatory properties, or glucosamine-chondroitin tablets, which help bolster cartilage in the joints. In either case, your pet’s doctor will choose a product that is designed to work with a pet’s unique physiology, which is different from a human’s.

If your cat is exhibiting any of the signs listed above, Contact Us to schedule an appointment with our veterinarian.

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Last week, I wrote about the various signs that a cat needs a veterinary check-up for more than an annual wellness visit.

The problem for some cat owners is that the cat may be resistant to getting into the carrier at home and out of the carrier at the doctor’s office. Here are some ways you can make veterinary visits easier on you and your cat:

  • Use a top-loading carrier (like the one pictured), which is easy to get most cats in and out of.Cat carrier
  • Let the cat play and nap in the carrier at home. You can make it more inviting by adding a blanket or a few treats. Do not close the cat inside the carrier right away, or it may not wish to get back in. Work up to closing the lid or the door, then locking them for a few seconds. Gradually extend the time your cat spends in the carrier with the doors locked.
  • Reduce your cat’s stress in the car by using the carrier and taking shorter rides to places other than the veterinary clinic. (Note: do not leave your pet alone in the car, especially during hot or cold weather.)
  • Spray Feliway (a synthetic calming pheromone) inside the carrier and on a towel. Then drape the towel over the carrier in the car (if the car is not too hot) and at the doctor’s office.
  • Avoid feeding your cat for several hours before riding in the car. (Cats travel better on an empty stomach.)
  • Bring your cat’s favorite treats and toys with you to the veterinary clinic.
  • Practice regular care routines at home, like grooming, nail trimming, and teeth brushing.
  • Pretend to do regular veterinary procedures with your cat, like touching the cat’s face, ears, feet, and tail. [Note: if the cat is feral and not vaccinated for Rabies, this is not advised.]
  • Give your cat and the veterinary healthcare team a chance to interact in a less stressful situation by taking your cat to the clinic for a weight check, rather than only for exams and procedures.

Whether your cat is due or overdue for its annual checkup — or if you’ve noticed signs of illness —  Contact Us or call 757-583-2619 to schedule an appointment today.

These tips are borrowed from the brochure, “Have We Seen Your Cat Lately?,” available at our office.

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Is your cat shy? Follow these steps to make vet visits easier.

If it’s been a year or more since your cat had a check-up, it’s time to get her to the vet.  Here are some tips* to make the veterinary visits more pleasant for you and your cat:

  • Start with a carrier that is easy to take your cat in and out of (top-loading carriers work best.)
  • Help your cat be more comfortable in the car by using the carrier and taking shorter rides to places other than the veterinary clinic.
  • Avoid feeding your cat for several hours before riding in the car (cats travel better on an empty stomach.)
  • Bring your cat’s favorite treats and toys with you to the veterinary clinic.
  • Practice regular care routines at home, like grooming, nail trimming and teeth brushing.
  • Pretend to do routine veterinary procedures with your cat, like touching the cat’s face, ears, feet and tail.
  • Give your cat and the veterinary healthcare team a chance to interact in a less stressful situation by taking your cat to the clinic for a weight check, rather than only for exams and procedures.

BONUS: Check out these products specially designed to help calm your stressed-out pet during vet visits, car rides, and thunderstorms.    

Feliway

HomeoPet Anxiety Relief

Thundershirt

*These tips are available at our office in the Pet Owner Guide “Have We Seen Your Cat Lately?” from BI Vetmedica.

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This article was originally published on June 20, 2011. 

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