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Posts Tagged ‘euthanasia’

When your pet is treated on an outpatient basis (i.e. sent home after the treatment visit), the doctor will often request a progress report before the next examination visit. Determining the next step in your pet’s treatment will be assisted by your observation of your pet at home.

So what should you report about your sick or injured pet, and why is it important?

Let’s break down the possibilities, following outpatient care for illness or injury.

Here is what to look for:

A. Your pet recovers fully / its condition significantly improves and does not relapse.

*In this case, further treatment may not be needed; however, always check with the doctor.
*Do not assume that treatment has ended and do not stop giving your pet its medications just because it appears to feel better.
*Some drugs need to be tapered off, while others – such as antibiotics – should be given for the entire course, to prevent relapse or resistant microbes.
*In the case of chronic illness [diabetes, renal failure, etc.], treatment is ongoing to provide your pet with the best chance of a happy life and reduced symptoms of illness.

B. Your pet’s condition improves somewhat, but without complete recovery.

*Further diagnostics and treatment may be needed to give your pet the best chance at a full recovery, if possible.

C. Your pet’s condition improves and then deteriorates.

*Further diagnostics and treatment are needed.
*Sometimes, medication provides temporary relief, and then signs return after medication is finished.
*The doctor will need to determine if a different course of treatment is appropriate, or whether the pet has a chronic condition, which would require long-term treatment.

D. Your pet shows no sign of improvement or your pet’s condition worsens.

*Further diagnostics and treatment are needed.
*If your pet shows no improvement with any treatment method, it may be an indication that recovery is not possible and humane euthanasia may be elected.

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It is vital to your pet’s health that you report your observations to the doctor or a staff member. If your pet does not recover or show significant lasting improvement, further steps can be taken, which may include referral to a veterinary hospital or appropriate specialist.
Remember, your pet’s doctor sees your pet for a very limited time in the veterinary clinic and has no information on your pet’s behavior or activity at home — where your pet spends the majority of its time — unless you share that information.
Together, we can work toward improving your pet’s health.

 

Questions about your pet’s condition or treatment regimen? If you are our client, please Contact Us. Otherwise, please contact your pet’s veterinarian, as we are unable to provide advice on cases outside of our clinic.

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A Rabies vaccination is a lifesaver for your pet — and it’s the law. Life is unpredictable — add wild or stray animals into the mix, and it can become downright chaotic at times.  You can’t control what happens to your pet all the time, but you can work toward better outcomes. Keeping your dog and cat up-to-date on Rabies boosters is just one way to protect your pets from an unexpected, aggressive animal encounter.

It looks cute - but this raccoon could be harboring a deadly virus. Photo by Gaby Muller.

It looks cute – but this raccoon could be harboring a deadly virus.
Photo by Gaby Muller.

Rabies is a fatal viral disease. It is transmitted through saliva (i.e. through biting) and travels through the nerves to the brain. Keep in mind that a pet cannot be tested for Rabies while alive. The test is conducted on the brain tissue of a deceased animal, only. For this reason, once a pet is bitten by an animal suspected of carrying Rabies, the pet is either quarantined and monitored closely for signs of disease (if its vaccine is current) or euthanized and tested for the virus (if the vaccine is lapsed or was never given.) In other words, if your pet is kept current on its vaccination, it is more likely to be spared from automatic euthanasia.

Rabies is considered a zoonotic health risk, since it can be transmitted from animals to humans. The laws requiring Rabies vaccination for dogs and cats are meant to benefit humans, as well. Even if you consider your pet to be 100% indoors-only, it still must receive the vaccination, under the law. Presumably, your pet leaves the house at least once a year to visit the veterinarian. An animal encounter can occur in your yard or at the doctor’s office. Or your pet may unexpectedly escape from the house and tangle with another animal. Or perhaps a member of your household will bring a new pet home, without knowing its vaccine or disease-exposure history.

Check your pet’s Rabies vaccine status now. Notice when it is due — or if it is overdue, call your veterinarian to schedule a booster. Don’t wait: you never know when trouble is hiding just around the corner.

Rabies cases reported this year in:
Norfolk…………………raccoon
Suffolk………………….raccoon
Virginia Beach………otter, raccoon, raccoon

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Photo of raccoon by Gaby Müller, courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

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WELCOME:

  • Toby
  • Marcy
  • Roxy
  • Siera
  • Qimmik
  • Becca
  • Lydia
  • Leo
  • Gino
  • Harley
  • Salt
  • Jasmine
  • Tiger
  • Peanut
  • Rooney
  • Nala
  • Lovey
  • Callie
  • Max
  • Fuzz
  • Peaches
  • Beanie
  • Bubbles
  • Sarge
  • Nitro
  • Thor
  • Charlie
  • Mini

IN MEMORIAM:

  • Bogey
  • Scout
  • Simba
  • PuppyPuppy
  • Dino
  • Sheba
  • Chloe
  • Sparky

P1080267

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New Arrivals:

  • Cody
  • CatDog
  • Dora
  • Brutus
  • Max
  • Mimi
  • Kitty Purry
  • Marilyn
  • Noodle
  • Mark
  • Pixie
  • Lacy
  • Titty
  • Roscoe
  • Stanley
  • Little Girl
  • Dash
  • Bailey
  • Ice-Lee

 

Fond Memories:

  • Buddy
  • Misty
  • Mona
  • Millie
  • Sebastian

webweaver flowers

 

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     Most of us will experience the rewards of pet ownership at some point in our lives.  Who can resist the fun of playing with a hyper kitten or a roly-poly puppy?  The bond we form with our pets can be as strong as any ties to our family and friends.  But because of this bond, we can experience very real and painful grief over the loss of our beloved pets.

     Whether the pet has lived a long, full life or one cut tragically short, the grieving process is the same.  There is no timetable to follow, no right way or wrong way to process the pet’s death – there is only your way, in your time.

     If you have lost a pet and feel you need the support of a group of people who understand what you’re going through or you’d like to speak privately to a trained grief support hotline staffer, these are the resources you need to know:

Whatever your level of need, someone is waiting to help you.  For face-to-face grief counseling, ask your physician to recommend a therapist.

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Originally published on August 16, 2011.

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Each month, we welcome our new patients and remember the patients that have passed on.

WELCOME:

  • Shoney
  • Penny
  • Todd
  • Salem
  • Eli
  • Sammy
  • Apollo
  • Zola
  • Rocky
  • Rusty
  • Saint
  • KK
  • Sugar
  • Uva
  • Luke
  • Miach
  • Asche
  • Goofy
  • Alex
  • Emerson
  • Sydney
  • Mischief
  • Champ
  • Diego
  • Creamsicle
  • Nina
  • Murph

WE REMEMBER:

  • Louie
  • Penelope
  • Florida Lee
  • Sadie

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Image courtesy of The Graphics Fairy.

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WELCOME:

  • Zoe
  • Garskith
  • Sammy
  • DaVinci
  • Casey
  • Rascal
  • Rommell IV
  • Dakota
  • Miracle
  • Leelou
  • Emmy
  • Ava
  • Lucy
  • Tik
  • Tiger
  • Guiness
  • Atticus Finchley
  • Blue
  • Maddie
  • Perrita
  • Evans Yorkies
  • Koda
  • Pearl
  • Mazey
  • Felix
  • Albert

IN MEMORIAM:

  • Suzie
  • TaiPan
  • Becky
  • Luke
  • Thad
  • Samantha
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Image by The Graphics Fairy

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