Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Dr. Donald Miele’

More brands have been added to the administration’s list of pet foods containing dangerous amounts of vitamin D

December 6, 2018

Veterinary Practice News

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is adding another recall to its initial two, following an investigation that found elevated levels of vitamin D in a number of goods.

According to the FDA, this is a developing situation and additional recalls may be announced.

[Read the FDA’s statement here — including instructions for pet owners.]

New reports indicate the goods come from a manufacturer that makes products marketed under several different brand names.

The administration’s scientists are currently analyzing all information available to determine whether the illnesses are definitively connected to diet. Samples of some of the products were evaluated and test results indicated the food contained as much as approximately 70 times the intended amount of vitamin D.

Consuming food with high levels of vitamin D is potentially toxic to dogs, and in severe cases may lead to kidney failure and/or death. It can also cause vomiting, loss of appetite, increased thirst, increased urination, excessive drooling, and weight loss.

[Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends checking your pantry for these foods that the FDA has identified:]

  • Nutrisca Chicken and Chickpea Dry Dog Food (4 lb., 15 lb., and 28 lb.)
  • Natural Life Pet Products Chicken and Potato Dry Dog Food (17.5 lb.)
  • Evolve Chicken and Rice Puppy Dry Dog Food (14 lb. and 28 lb.)
  • Sportsman’s Pride Large Breed Puppy Dry Dog Food (40 lb.)
  • Triumph Chicken and Rice Recipe Dry Dog Food (3.5 lb., 16 lb., and 30 lb.)
  • ANF Lamb and Rice Dry Dog Food (3 kg and 7.5 kg)
  • Lidl Orlando Grain-Free Chicken and Chickpea Superfood Recipe Dog Food
    (#215662)
  • Kroger Abound Chicken and Brown Rice Recipe Dog Food (4 lb., 14 lb., and 24 lb.)
  • ELM Chicken and Chickpea Recipe (3 lb. and 28 lb.)
  • ELM K9 Naturals Chicken Recipe (40 lb.)
  • Nature’s Promise Chicken and Brown Rice Dog Food (4 lb., 14 lb., and 28 lb.)
  • Nature’s Place Real Country Chicken and Brown Rice Dog Food (5 lb. and 15 lb.)

If you have any of the affected foods, call the manufacturer’s phone number (listed on the packaging) and ask for instructions.

If you pet is experiencing signs of illness as mentioned above, contact your veterinarian or veterinary emergency hospital.

This blog post condensed from an article published by Veterinary Practice News.

Read Full Post »

We have good news for itchy pets in Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Chesapeake, and the rest of Hampton Roads: the local veterinary dermatology specialty practice has re-opened in our area.

Norfolk veterinarians, like Dr. Donald Miele at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, refer tough, tricky, stubborn, and unusual skin cases to the dermatologist for testing and treatment.

You may recall that the dermatology practice had its offices at BluePearl, a veterinary emergency hospital in Virginia Beach. Now, Dr. Marlene Pariser has opened Coastal Virginia Veterinary Dermatology [CVVD], offering the care our clients have come to know and trust, in a new location in Virginia Beach.

If you are a client of Little Creek Veterinary Clinic and you would like your pet evaluated by Dr. Pariser, please Contact Us to schedule a referral examination. Once your referral paperwork has been forwarded to CVVD, you will be able to schedule an appointment.

We look forward to partnering with you and with Coastal Virginia Veterinary Dermatology, to keep your pet comfortable, healthy, and happy for years to come.

Ready to schedule an appointment?  Contact Us online or call our office at 757-583-2619.

Read Full Post »

There are scarier things around Norfolk and Virginia Beach this Halloween than witches, ghouls, and ghosts.

Watch out for foxes, raccoons, bats, and skunks — common carriers of Rabies, a deadly virus that can be spread to animals and people. 

Check your pet’s Rabies vaccination status — if it’s due or past due, make an appointment today to update your pet’s Rabies vaccination — don’t wait!

[If your pet is a patient at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic,
be sure to Contact Us.] 

There is no cure for Rabies. And Rabies is always fatal. That is why preventing Rabies with a vaccination is one of the most important things you can do for your pet and your family — and it’s the law.

Read Full Post »

What to do when you find a lost pet — Tips by HomeAgain

“You’ve been reading your Lost Pet Alerts, keeping a good lookout, and then, finally, you see a missing pet you know you can help! We don’t want to leave you hanging out there, PetRescuer, so we’ve compiled a list of tips and instructions for the best ways to approach a lost pet and what to do when you have a found pet in your care.

Approaching a Lost Pet

First things first, it’s really important to remember that lost pets are out of their element, and their behavior is often unpredictable. Be mindful of your approach:

  • Walk slowly toward the pet.
  • If the pet starts growling, back away.
  • Don’t make any sudden movements, like a quick grab for a collar, or you may provoke the pet into aggressive behavior.
  • If you can approach the pet without scaring it, try talking to it to give it a little reassurance.
  • Never put yourself at risk when trying to rescue a lost pet. Back away slowly and call animal control for help.

Sick and injured pets are almost always on the defensive, so in those situations, you should call animal control services for help. Even though you want to help, only trained professionals know how to handle these situations in a way that protects the pet and people involved.

What to Do With a Lost Pet

You’re standing toe-to-paw with a lost pet, now what? The first thing you need to do is check for a collar and ID tags and immediately call the number on the tags. Often, a pet will have an owner tag and a vet’s tag. Try to call the owner first, and if she doesn’t answer, try the vet.”

[Did You Know? If you find a dog or cat, Little Creek Veterinary Clinic will scan it for a microchip — FOR FREE — to help you get the pet back home.]

“As you may know, many lost pets don’t have collars. Cats generally don’t wear collars and tags, and lost dogs also have a tendency to lose their collars, too. So it’s pretty common to come across a lost pet without a collar and ID tags.

You have a few options for what to do with a lost pet with no form of visible ID:

  • Take it to a vet clinic or animal shelter to be scanned for a microchip.
    • If you take the pet to a vet clinic, please be aware that they may not shelter the pet until the owner is located–except maybe in the strange circumstance that it’s one of their patients.
  • Call a local shelter with animal control services to come and pick up the pet.
    • Not all shelters have animal control services, so you may have to call more than one.

If a microchip scan positively identifies the pet, then you have to decide whether to keep the pet in your care until the owner arrives or leave it with a shelter. This, of course, is a decision only you can make, and it depends entirely on your circumstances. All PetRescuers need to remember to keep any lost pets separated from their children and other pets. This helps ensure that everyone is safe, so that your good deed doesn’t end badly.

Thanks for all your help and remember to play it safe around lost pets. Happy rescuing!”

***********************

Learn more about why Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends HomeAgain microchips for his patients, then Contact Us to schedule your pet for a quick and easy HomeAgain microchip ID implant.

  1. https://littlecreekvet.com/2014/09/23/getting-your-lost-pet-back-is-just-the-tip-of-the-iceberg-heres-why/
  2. https://littlecreekvet.com/2014/09/18/microchips-are-a-safe-effective-permanent-id-heres-why/
  3. https://littlecreekvet.com/2016/09/13/lost-pet-microchip-recovery/

 

Read Full Post »

Cats can be such quiet, independent creatures that it is easy to forget they need regular doctor visits, just like dogs.

Cats should receive a yearly check-up, fecal analysis, and vaccine boosters. And remember to pick up their flea and heartworm preventatives (such as Revolution)!

Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, says the good news is, certain conditions viral diseases and parasite infestation can be prevented or quickly treated — but aging brings its own problems, and you can’t stop the sands of time. That’s why it’s important to combine careful observation with annual veterinary check-ups.

Cats are notorious for hiding pain and illness, but you can use your detective skills to know when there’s a problem.

Look for these signs — and Contact Us at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic to request a brochure with detailed information on each:

  • Peeing or pooping outside the litterbox
  • Becoming less social
  • Decrease in activity
  • Changes in sleep habits
  • Increase or decrease in food and water consumption
  • Unexplained weight loss or gain
  • Over-grooming or under-grooming
  • Howling; increased vocalization
  • Bad breath

Remember: you don’t have to wait for your cat to be sick before scheduling a visit with the veterinarian!

Coming up next: What you can do to prepare your cat for veterinary visits.

Read Full Post »

*In our opinion.

Do you like to win awards, be recognized for your achievements, and get jealous glances from your friends and family? Do you wish your pet could experience the grandiosity of winning a MAJOR AWARD? Then Little Creek Veterinary Clinic has just the thing for you!

Behold: The Clean As A Whistle Award, granted to dogs and cats whose stool samples are determined by microscopic examination to be free of parasites, parasite eggs, blood, and foreign objects.

Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends that all dogs and cats living in the Hampton Roads area have their stool examined at least twice a year.

Here is a list of parasites or their eggs that we may find on microscopic examination of the stool, which  cannot be seen with the naked eye: Coccidiae, whipworms, hookworms, mange mites. And although you may see adult Tapeworm segments and Roundworms in your pet’s stool, it is possible for those same worms to reside in your pet’s gut, undetected, while shedding microscopic eggs that you can’t see.

Even indoor pets can be exposed to parasites. Fleas carry Tapeworms, and bugs such as flies and cockroaches can carry Roundworms. If your pet likes to catch bugs, she may be catching a whole lot more!

Getting your pet’s stool sample examined is easy. You collect the sample (we can provide a container for this purpose), bring it to us, and we’ll do the rest. [Testing fee applies.]

And if your pet’s poo is happily free of any parasites or other items of concern, we’ll e-mail this certificate that you can print out and post in a place of honor in your home:

 

Read Full Post »

We will be taking time off to spend with our family during the Christmas and New Year holidays, and we hope you will take a break, too — whatever you may be celebrating! (For some, it’s the latest Star Wars episode.)

Jolly old St. Nick has our list of days off (and half-day off) at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic:

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »