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Posts Tagged ‘Dr. Donald Miele’

What to do when you find a lost pet — Tips by HomeAgain

“You’ve been reading your Lost Pet Alerts, keeping a good lookout, and then, finally, you see a missing pet you know you can help! We don’t want to leave you hanging out there, PetRescuer, so we’ve compiled a list of tips and instructions for the best ways to approach a lost pet and what to do when you have a found pet in your care.

Approaching a Lost Pet

First things first, it’s really important to remember that lost pets are out of their element, and their behavior is often unpredictable. Be mindful of your approach:

  • Walk slowly toward the pet.
  • If the pet starts growling, back away.
  • Don’t make any sudden movements, like a quick grab for a collar, or you may provoke the pet into aggressive behavior.
  • If you can approach the pet without scaring it, try talking to it to give it a little reassurance.
  • Never put yourself at risk when trying to rescue a lost pet. Back away slowly and call animal control for help.

Sick and injured pets are almost always on the defensive, so in those situations, you should call animal control services for help. Even though you want to help, only trained professionals know how to handle these situations in a way that protects the pet and people involved.

What to Do With a Lost Pet

You’re standing toe-to-paw with a lost pet, now what? The first thing you need to do is check for a collar and ID tags and immediately call the number on the tags. Often, a pet will have an owner tag and a vet’s tag. Try to call the owner first, and if she doesn’t answer, try the vet.”

[Did You Know? If you find a dog or cat, Little Creek Veterinary Clinic will scan it for a microchip — FOR FREE — to help you get the pet back home.]

“As you may know, many lost pets don’t have collars. Cats generally don’t wear collars and tags, and lost dogs also have a tendency to lose their collars, too. So it’s pretty common to come across a lost pet without a collar and ID tags.

You have a few options for what to do with a lost pet with no form of visible ID:

  • Take it to a vet clinic or animal shelter to be scanned for a microchip.
    • If you take the pet to a vet clinic, please be aware that they may not shelter the pet until the owner is located–except maybe in the strange circumstance that it’s one of their patients.
  • Call a local shelter with animal control services to come and pick up the pet.
    • Not all shelters have animal control services, so you may have to call more than one.

If a microchip scan positively identifies the pet, then you have to decide whether to keep the pet in your care until the owner arrives or leave it with a shelter. This, of course, is a decision only you can make, and it depends entirely on your circumstances. All PetRescuers need to remember to keep any lost pets separated from their children and other pets. This helps ensure that everyone is safe, so that your good deed doesn’t end badly.

Thanks for all your help and remember to play it safe around lost pets. Happy rescuing!”

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Learn more about why Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends HomeAgain microchips for his patients, then Contact Us to schedule your pet for a quick and easy HomeAgain microchip ID implant.

  1. https://littlecreekvet.com/2014/09/23/getting-your-lost-pet-back-is-just-the-tip-of-the-iceberg-heres-why/
  2. https://littlecreekvet.com/2014/09/18/microchips-are-a-safe-effective-permanent-id-heres-why/
  3. https://littlecreekvet.com/2016/09/13/lost-pet-microchip-recovery/

 

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Cats can be such quiet, independent creatures that it is easy to forget they need regular doctor visits, just like dogs.

Cats should receive a yearly check-up, fecal analysis, and vaccine boosters. And remember to pick up their flea and heartworm preventatives (such as Revolution)!

Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, says the good news is, certain conditions viral diseases and parasite infestation can be prevented or quickly treated — but aging brings its own problems, and you can’t stop the sands of time. That’s why it’s important to combine careful observation with annual veterinary check-ups.

Cats are notorious for hiding pain and illness, but you can use your detective skills to know when there’s a problem.

Look for these signs — and Contact Us at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic to request a brochure with detailed information on each:

  • Peeing or pooping outside the litterbox
  • Becoming less social
  • Decrease in activity
  • Changes in sleep habits
  • Increase or decrease in food and water consumption
  • Unexplained weight loss or gain
  • Over-grooming or under-grooming
  • Howling; increased vocalization
  • Bad breath

Remember: you don’t have to wait for your cat to be sick before scheduling a visit with the veterinarian!

Coming up next: What you can do to prepare your cat for veterinary visits.

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*In our opinion.

Do you like to win awards, be recognized for your achievements, and get jealous glances from your friends and family? Do you wish your pet could experience the grandiosity of winning a MAJOR AWARD? Then Little Creek Veterinary Clinic has just the thing for you!

Behold: The Clean As A Whistle Award, granted to dogs and cats whose stool samples are determined by microscopic examination to be free of parasites, parasite eggs, blood, and foreign objects.

Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends that all dogs and cats living in the Hampton Roads area have their stool examined at least twice a year.

Here is a list of parasites or their eggs that we may find on microscopic examination of the stool, which  cannot be seen with the naked eye: Coccidiae, whipworms, hookworms, mange mites. And although you may see adult Tapeworm segments and Roundworms in your pet’s stool, it is possible for those same worms to reside in your pet’s gut, undetected, while shedding microscopic eggs that you can’t see.

Even indoor pets can be exposed to parasites. Fleas carry Tapeworms, and bugs such as flies and cockroaches can carry Roundworms. If your pet likes to catch bugs, she may be catching a whole lot more!

Getting your pet’s stool sample examined is easy. You collect the sample (we can provide a container for this purpose), bring it to us, and we’ll do the rest. [Testing fee applies.]

And if your pet’s poo is happily free of any parasites or other items of concern, we’ll e-mail this certificate that you can print out and post in a place of honor in your home:

 

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We will be taking time off to spend with our family during the Christmas and New Year holidays, and we hope you will take a break, too — whatever you may be celebrating! (For some, it’s the latest Star Wars episode.)

Jolly old St. Nick has our list of days off (and half-day off) at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic:

 

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Little Creek Veterinary Clinic will be closed this week
on Saturday, December 16th, for a family event.

Dr. Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian,
will resume regular business hours
on Monday, December 18th.

As usual, our office will be closed on Wednesdays,
and open on Thursday and Friday.

Contact Us to schedule an appointment.

If your pet needs immediate medical attention,
call 757-499-5463.

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Whether you have a dog that chases cars, jumps up to greet people, or chews on inappropriate objects, pet training consultant Mikkel Becker has dog training videos to help.

Choose from over 20 dog training videos to address your pet’s concerns on Mikkel Becker’s YouTube channel.

According to Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, dogs feel more secure when they know their boundaries and what is expected of them (just like children!) Working breed and sporting breed dogs, especially, build confidence through mastering tasks and skills, but any dog can be trained. A confident dog is a happy dog. Help your pet fit in with the family through basic dog training techniques. 

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Halloween is our favorite time of year! Why? Find the answer here!
(Hint: It has something to do with a Norfolk veterinarian.)

Enjoy these Halloween pet portraits,
featuring some of the pets
(and their owners!) who visited us at
Little Creek Veterinary Clinic this month.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

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