Posts Tagged ‘Dr. Donald Miele’

Last Tuesday, we learned about the combination of vaccines that make up the canine DHPP booster, commonly referred to as “the distemper shot.” 

Cats also receive a cocktail of vaccinations, typically rolled into one shot. Since many cats are allowed to roam outdoors unsupervised, it is especially important to keep cats vaccinated against Rabies and other diseases. This is a closer look at the components of the FVRCCP vaccine, sometimes known as the “feline distemper shot.”

FVR is for Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, aka Feline Herpesvirus-1, a severe upper respiratory disease that, once contracted, often remains in the cat’s body. Recurrent outbreaks throughout the cat’s life are common. Signs include fever, congestion, runny eyes and nose, sores and crusts on the face, lip ulcers, mouth breathing, coughing, sneezing, and drooling. Vaccination helps reduce the severity of signs.

C is for Calicivirus, an upper respiratory disease that can cause fever, blisters on the tongue, and may turn into pneumonia.

C is for Chlamydiosis, a bacterial respiratory infection that is highly contagious. Signs include conjunctivitis, sneezing, runny eyes, excessive drooling, and coughing.

P is for Feline Panleukopenia, aka Feline Distemper, a contagious virus that causes fever, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, depression, dehydration, and can lead to death.

Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends that all cats living in the Norfolk/Virginia Beach/Chesapeake region receive their FVRCCP booster, along with the Rabies vaccine. The FVRCCP booster protects cats against the most common, and serious, feline diseases.

Is your cat due or past due to receive its booster vaccinations? Contact Us to schedule an appointment with our veterinarian today!

Note: Other vaccines are available to cats, including Rabies and Feline Leukemia. However, those vaccines are given in a separate injection and, for our purposes, are not considered part of the distemper combinations.

Lg Caduceus

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True or False: Only senior pets are at risk of dental disease.

False!

A 3 year old cat or dog is still pretty young —
but they’re already at risk of periodontal disease.

Schedule time each day to brush your pet’s teeth, as part of an at-home healthy mouth plan.

You brush your teeth every night, but your pet can’t brush its own teeth — you get to do that! Yay!

Need help or inspiration? Check out these tips on brushing your pet’s teeth, to help prevent or slow down periodontal disease. 

Not sure about the state of your pet’s mouth? Contact Us to schedule an exam for your pet with Dr. Miele.

Double-click the image to enlarge.

Infographic courtesy of ASPCA Pet Health Insurance. Take a look at how their customizable plans can be made to fit your budget.

 

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Tooth or Consequences: Why Your Pet Needs Dental Care

Why should you care about your pet’s dental health?

Because oral infections are painful, smelly, and costly to treat.

Prevent nasty oral infections with regular tooth brushing — or use a gel like VetzLife — and an oral care water additive.

Dr. Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, recommends this water additive by Oxyfresh.

Here’s good news you can use: Some pet insurance plans help pay the costs of routine teeth cleaning!

Click image to enlarge — then click again when image opens on new page

Click image to enlarge — then click again when image opens on new page

 

Infographic courtesy of Nationwide Pet Insurance.

 

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By Dr. Marc for Pets Best Pet Health Insurance
(Shared by permission)

Dr. Marc is a veterinarian guest blogger for Pets Best Insurance, a pet insurance agency for dogs and cats.

First let’s start with clarifying what shivering (or trembling) is versus what a seizure is.
A seizure is when the dog suddenly loses all body control, paddling their legs, jerking or convulsing. It can last for a number of minutes. To learn more, visit Dr. Fiona’s blog post on dog seizures.
Shivering is when a dog can make eye contact with you and respond to you, but its body is shaking. Shivering can vary from minimally, to a lot, but the dog still has control of its body.

6 Reasons Your Dog May Shiver

1) The most common reason a dog shivers is due to being cold. A normal dog’s temperature may be as high as 102.5 F. Since a dog’s body is warmer than a persons, just touching your dog won’t accurately let you know if they’re cold or not. So be careful during the winter months with dogs being outside, especially little dogs.

2) Dogs shiver due to anxiety or fear. Thunderstorms, fireworks, travel, or any type of environmental change can cause dogs anxiety or fear. If your dog has severe shivering and anxiety in these situations, they may benefit from an anti-anxiety medication during the stressful periods. Your veterinarian can help you evaluate your therapeutic options.

[Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, recommends natural supplements to help with storm stress. Already a client? Contact Us to learn more.]

3) Dogs shiver with excitement. For example there may be a squirrel outside they really want to go chase. Or before being fed, they see the food going in the bowl and they start shivering with anticipation.

4) Dogs shiver because it’s a learned behavior. This occurs when a dog shivers and it results in a desired response. For example, every time Fluffy shivers, mom says, “poor Fluffy.” Fluffy then gets picked up, wrapped in a blanket and showered with attention. Fluffy quickly learns that just by shivering she gets the attention she wants.

5) Shivering can result from medical and physiologic problems. The pain or illness can cause dogs to shiver. It’s important to find the underlying problem so that it can be addressed. In addition to shivering from the pain, the pain itself can induce anxiety in the dog, resulting in more shivering.

6) There are also some toxins that can cause a convulsive response in the animal. This convulsive like behavior could be misconstrued as shivering, when in reality it may be a much more serious issue.
If your dog’s shivering seems out of the ordinary, or like it’s resulting from a serious issue, you need to visit your veterinarian. They can help if there is a medical issue or possibly prescribe medication to help.

Pet insurance makes necessary veterinary care more affordable; Pets Best Insurance reimburses you off your veterinary bill, from 70% to 100%! Considering Pets Best? Read pet insurance reviews here.

This article originally appeared on the Pets Best blog here.

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3 COMMON COLD WEATHER DANGERS TO WATCH OUT FOR!

By Dr. Tracy McFarland, for Pets Best Pet Health Insurance
(Shared by permission)

While Fall is definitely my favorite season, it does bring certain hazards to watch for when it comes to your cat.  Knowledge of these potential dangers gives you the power to keep your cat safe. Prevention is much better than treatment! Here are three hazards you should be aware of:

1. ANTIFREEZE

Cooler weather often brings the necessity for changing or adding antifreeze to your car. If your radiator leaks, which occurs more commonly in older cars, antifreeze can end up on your garage floor, driveway, or in the gutter.

Antifreeze can contain ethylene glycol, which is extremely poisonous to cats. Because ethylene glycol has a sweet taste, cats, dogs and wildlife are attracted to it. As little as a teaspoon of antifreeze can cause irreversible kidney damage and death, if not treated within the first few hours after ingestion. Antifreeze causes harm, first by gastrointestinal irritation and then by the formation of calcium oxalate crystals that destroy a cat’s kidneys, if prompt action isn’t taken to remove as much of the toxin as possible, followed by intravenous fluids to flush the kidneys, for two to three days. Pets may display confusion, weakness, or a wobbly gait. If given soon enough, veterinary intervention can prevent severe kidney damage caused by antifreeze toxicity. Consider using one of the newer nontoxic antifreeze compounds in your car’s radiator.

[Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, says the best way
to protect your cat from winter hazards outdoors is to keep your cat indoors!]

2. HYPOTHERMIA

Cold weather itself poses a hazard. Extreme cold weather can cause life-threatening hypothermia, despite cats’ fur coats. While certain breeds such as Maine Coons have adapted to withstand harsh weather conditions, and most shorthaired cats can develop a thick undercoat when exposed to cold temperatures over time, the combination of cold and wet can be deadly. Signs of hypothermia include shivering, shaking, lethargy, and slowed or dull mental state.

3. FROSTBITE

Another cold weather hazard to cats during the winter is frostbite. This condition occurs when skin or body parts actually freeze from being exposed to extreme cold. Skin at the affected areas may look discolored, painful when touched or lack of feeling altogether, cold to the touch, and even frost or ice crystals may appear on the skin.

Common pet extremities susceptible to frostbite include:

  • Paw pads
  • Toes
  • Tail tip
  • Nose
  • Ears
  • Muzzle

If your cats live outdoors, shelter from cold, wind and damp will be very helpful, and indeed lifesaving in extreme weather conditions. If bringing your outdoor cat indoors into your home is not an option, please make sure he or she has an insulated doghouse, barn or out building to shelter in. The floor needs to be raised enough to stay dry, even in heavy rain.  Certain breeds cannot withstand severe weather, even with shelter. The “oriental” breeds, such as Siamese, Burmese, Tonkinese and Abyssinians have sleek coats with little undercoat. They love warmth and would be miserable and at risk in cold weather.

Enjoy all the pleasures of the season and with a few precautions your cat can be there to enjoy them too.

Need help identifying signs or symptoms of the hazards mentioned above? Every Pets Best Insurance policy includes access to our 24/7 Pet Helpline. Learn more about this service and how it can help keep your pets safe and potentially save a trip to the vet.

By Dr. Tracy McFarland, a veterinarian and writer for Pets Best. Since 2005, Pets Best has offered pet health insurance plans to U.S. dogs and cats.

This article originally appeared on the Pets Best blog here.

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More brands have been added to the administration’s list of pet foods containing dangerous amounts of vitamin D

December 6, 2018

Veterinary Practice News

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is adding another recall to its initial two, following an investigation that found elevated levels of vitamin D in a number of goods.

According to the FDA, this is a developing situation and additional recalls may be announced.

[Read the FDA’s statement here — including instructions for pet owners.]

New reports indicate the goods come from a manufacturer that makes products marketed under several different brand names.

The administration’s scientists are currently analyzing all information available to determine whether the illnesses are definitively connected to diet. Samples of some of the products were evaluated and test results indicated the food contained as much as approximately 70 times the intended amount of vitamin D.

Consuming food with high levels of vitamin D is potentially toxic to dogs, and in severe cases may lead to kidney failure and/or death. It can also cause vomiting, loss of appetite, increased thirst, increased urination, excessive drooling, and weight loss.

[Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends checking your pantry for these foods that the FDA has identified:]

  • Nutrisca Chicken and Chickpea Dry Dog Food (4 lb., 15 lb., and 28 lb.)
  • Natural Life Pet Products Chicken and Potato Dry Dog Food (17.5 lb.)
  • Evolve Chicken and Rice Puppy Dry Dog Food (14 lb. and 28 lb.)
  • Sportsman’s Pride Large Breed Puppy Dry Dog Food (40 lb.)
  • Triumph Chicken and Rice Recipe Dry Dog Food (3.5 lb., 16 lb., and 30 lb.)
  • ANF Lamb and Rice Dry Dog Food (3 kg and 7.5 kg)
  • Lidl Orlando Grain-Free Chicken and Chickpea Superfood Recipe Dog Food
    (#215662)
  • Kroger Abound Chicken and Brown Rice Recipe Dog Food (4 lb., 14 lb., and 24 lb.)
  • ELM Chicken and Chickpea Recipe (3 lb. and 28 lb.)
  • ELM K9 Naturals Chicken Recipe (40 lb.)
  • Nature’s Promise Chicken and Brown Rice Dog Food (4 lb., 14 lb., and 28 lb.)
  • Nature’s Place Real Country Chicken and Brown Rice Dog Food (5 lb. and 15 lb.)

If you have any of the affected foods, call the manufacturer’s phone number (listed on the packaging) and ask for instructions.

If you pet is experiencing signs of illness as mentioned above, contact your veterinarian or veterinary emergency hospital.

This blog post condensed from an article published by Veterinary Practice News.

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We have good news for itchy pets in Norfolk, Virginia Beach, Chesapeake, and the rest of Hampton Roads: the local veterinary dermatology specialty practice has re-opened in our area.

Norfolk veterinarians, like Dr. Donald Miele at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, refer tough, tricky, stubborn, and unusual skin cases to the veterinary dermatologist for testing and treatment.

You may recall that the dermatology practice had its offices at BluePearl, a veterinary emergency hospital in Virginia Beach. Now, Dr. Marlene Pariser has opened Coastal Virginia Veterinary Dermatology [CVVD], offering the care our clients have come to know and trust, in a new location in Virginia Beach.

[Note: Dr. Pariser’s office is in Virginia Beach and is not associated with Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.]

If you are a client of Little Creek Veterinary Clinic and you would like your pet evaluated by Dr. Pariser, please Contact Us to schedule a referral examination. Once your referral paperwork has been forwarded to CVVD, you will be able to schedule an appointment with the veterinary dermatologist.

We look forward to partnering with you and with Coastal Virginia Veterinary Dermatology, to keep your pet comfortable, healthy, and happy for years to come.

Ready to schedule a referral appointment?  Contact Us online or call our office at 757-583-2619.

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