Posts Tagged ‘Donald A. Miele VMD’

Are you wondering whether it’s okay to pause your pet’s intestinal worm protection during the chilly winter months?

Don’t do it! Worms can be found in the cozy, warm intestines of dogs and cats, even during the winter, and their eggs can be deposited into soil where your pet might pick them up. Fleas and houseflies are also carriers of intestinal parasites, like Tapeworms and Roundworms, respectively.

Dr. Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, discovered eggs of Tapeworms, Roundworms, Hookworms, and Whipworms in the stool samples of numerous patients over the past month. Take a look at what we’re finding in cats and dogs this winter:

Click any photo to enlarge for detail.
All photos taken at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic
(Norfolk, VA) under microscope.




If your pet has been off its heartworm / intestinal worm protection this winter, Contact Us to request a parasite screening as the first step to getting your pet protected again.

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At the end of last October, we revealed the new look for Oxyfresh Fresh Breath for Pets — formerly known as Oxyfresh Pet Oral Hygiene Solution.

Since then, Oxyfresh has changed its product name and label again, to avoid confusion with another similarly-named product on the market. The new product name is Oxyfresh Dental Care Water Additive.

Here’s a sneak preview of the new label:

Oxyfresh Pet Dental Water Additive

Evolution of Oxyfresh, with the current Dental Care Water Additive label

Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, says, “The label is different, but the Oxyfresh inside is the same one that you’ve come to know and trust.”

Oxyfresh Dental Care Water Additive has no taste, odor or color to discourage your pet from drinking its water.
Oxyfresh goes to work in your pet’s mouth, cleaning food debris off teeth after a meal. It can eliminate foul breath odors, and it reduces plaque and tartar buildup to defend against periodontal disease.

Questions? Contact Us so we can help!

 

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Seasonal Weight Gain For Pets Is Serious Business

Most of us are familiar with the holiday tendency to add a few extra pounds. But where people have the option to go to the gym, pets do not.

Consider these steps you can take to help your pet shed those holiday pounds:
Feed your pet a balanced pet food diet.
Do not give your dog or cat table treats. He might not like it at first, but this is the only way to maintain a healthy weight. This is tough love, and your pet will benefit from a nutritionally balanced diet.

[What’s the big deal about obesity and your pet’s health? Find out here!]


Step up the exercise.
Longer walks or play times will be good exercise for both of you. If you live in a cold climate, there might be an indoor facility that will let you walk your dog.

Try changing to a premium dietary low fat/high fiber pet food.
When switching, it’s important to change the food gradually. Provide your pet’s daily food portion as 75% of the old food and 25% of the new formula on the first day. For day two, try a 50-50 ratio. Then, proceed to a 25-75 split. On day four, go to 100 percent of the new low-fat food. Seek your veterinarian’s advice if you are unsure about which brand of pet food to buy.

Instead of treats for praise, try play.
Treats add up fast, so when your pet is good, play or pull out a new toy instead of rewarding with food.

Set a deadline for your pet reaching a certain target weight.
That will keep you motivated and focused, and might help you lose some of your holiday weight, too!

This article appeared on Nationwide Pet Insurance’s blog here.

Bonus Content

Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, uses the following formula for safe weight loss for your pet:
Cat………………..1/4 lb per week
Small dog………1/2 lb per week
Medium dog…..1 lb per week
Large dog……….1 1/2 lbs per week

Wondering what your pet’s target weight should be? Contact Us and we’ll work with you to set a goal! (Offer open to clients of Little Creek Veterinary Clinic [Norfolk, VA] only).

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About Nationwide pet insurance
With more than 700,000 insured pets, Nationwide is the first and largest pet health insurance provider in the United States. Nationwide pet health insurance plans cover dogs, cats, birds and exotic pets for multiple medical problems and conditions relating to accidents, illnesses and injuries. Medical plans are available in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Underwritten by Veterinary Pet Insurance Company (CA), Columbus, OH, an A.M. Best A+ rated company (2017); National Casualty Company (all other states), Columbus, OH, an A.M. Best A+ rated company (2017). Agency of Record: DVM Insurance Agency. Pet owners can find Nationwide pet insurance on Facebook or follow on Twitter. For more information about Nationwide pet insurance, call 800-USA-PETS (800-872-7387) or visit petinsurance.com.

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We’re ready for Halloween — are you?

Say “hello” to Brom Bones and his pet rat, Templeton.

Speaking of a reason to change your look: two old favorites on our shelf — Dermal Soothe spray and Oxyfresh Pet Oral Hygiene — have revamped their packaging and labels.

Here they are, so you’ll know what to look for:

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Looks like we tempted fate by blogging about making a Disaster Plan, back on September 4th.

Although the track of Hurricane Florence remains somewhat uncertain, she is now predicted to move just south of Virginia, which would deliver us only a glancing blow.

However, hurricanes are notorious for doing the unexpected. Remember Hurricane Matthew?

With that in mind, and with the potential for hazardous driving conditions around the region on Thursday and Friday, we have elected to cancel office hours at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic on those days. Depending upon property damage and flooding after the storm, we will likely be closed Saturday, as well.

Dr. Miele will be in the office Wednesday morning, September 12th, to provide wellness care. Patients needing diagnostics or extended treatment will be referred to an appropriate hospital.

BluePearl Veterinary Partners in Town Center will be open during the storm. If your pet has an emergency, call 757-499-5463.

 

Bonus content: What will happen to the animals at the zoo?
Find out here.

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As a reminder, Little Creek Veterinary Clinic is closed on Wednesday each week.

If your pet needs immediate medical attention while Dr. Miele is out of the office, please contact BluePearl Emergency Hospital at 757-499-5463.

BluePearl keeps us informed about your pet’s emergency medical care, and helps us keep your pet’s medical records complete.

For non-emergency situations, please Contact Us via internet, email [littlecreekvet@live.com], or phone [757-583-2619 — leave a message.] For those leaving a voice mail message, please be aware that we do not have Caller ID, so it is essential that you slowly and clearly say your preferred contact phone number.

Thank you — and keep in touch!

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It Pays to Test:
Why your Dog Needs an Annual Heartworm Check-up

Spring, summer, winter or fall — your pets need year-round prevention to keep them free of deadly heartworms and other parasites. While an annual heartworm check-up at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic is one of the best moves you can make as a responsible pet owner, it’s helpful to understand why heartworm testing and examinations are important.

My dog was just tested for heartworm a year ago. Why does he need a test again so soon?

Your dog should have a heartworm test once a year to determine if he became infected with heartworms during the previous season. It takes months before a dog with heartworm will test positive on a heartworm test, so testing annually — usually at the time the prescription for his heartworm medication is being renewed — makes sense. As with many diseases, the earlier heartworm can be diagnosed, the better the chances he will recover. If heartworm disease in a dog goes undetected and untreated, the worms can cause progressive and potentially fatal damage to his arteries, heart and lungs.

If my dog is on continuous heartworm prevention, why does he need to be tested?

That’s a logical question if you’re a responsible owner who keeps your dog on heartworm prevention year-round. The reason for annual testing of dogs in this case is to ensure his prevention program is working. Heartworm medications are highly effective, but dogs can still become infected.

Why? A common reason is simple forgetfulness. Missing just one dose of a monthly medication — or giving it late — can leave a dog unprotected. Even if you do everything right and on time, it’s no guarantee. Some dogs spit out their heartworm pills when their owners aren’t looking. Others may vomit their pills or rub off a topical heartworm medication. Whatever the cause of missing or delaying a dose, any of these mishaps can put your dog at risk of heartworm infection.

Click to enlarge


What else do I need to know about heartworms, testing, and prevention?

  1. Heartworm disease is easier to prevent than to treat. Prevention is a simple, once-a-month chewable treat or topical application plus an annual blood test. Treatment includes blood tests and Xrays or ultrasound; a course of antibiotics; a series of painful medication injections deep into the pet’s muscles near the spine; and strict confinement for a month. Treatment can pose its own set of health risks. And treating heartworm disease can cost more than 15 times the amount of a year’s worth of prevention. 
  2. Heartworms are spread by mosquitoes. There are 22 different mosquito species in the U.S. that carry heartworm, and they are active at different times of the day and year.
  3. A heartworm test requires just a few drops of blood, and you will receive the results of your dog’s test during the vet visit.
  4. If your pet develops heartworm disease while taking its preventative medication, the medication’s manufacturer may want to see proof of annual testing before they pay for your pet’s treatment.

Remember, the best offense against heartworm disease is a good defense.
Follow American Heartworm Society recommendations and Think 12 — give heartworm preventatives 12 months a year and test your dog every 12 months.

This article adapted from “It Pays to Test: Why Your Dog Needs an Annual Heartworm Check-up” by the American Heartworm Society.

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