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Posts Tagged ‘Donald A. Miele VMD’

Looks like we tempted fate by blogging about making a Disaster Plan, back on September 4th.

Although the track of Hurricane Florence remains somewhat uncertain, she is now predicted to move just south of Virginia, which would deliver us only a glancing blow.

However, hurricanes are notorious for doing the unexpected. Remember Hurricane Matthew?

With that in mind, and with the potential for hazardous driving conditions around the region on Thursday and Friday, we have elected to cancel office hours at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic on those days. Depending upon property damage and flooding after the storm, we will likely be closed Saturday, as well.

Dr. Miele will be in the office Wednesday morning, September 12th, to provide wellness care. Patients needing diagnostics or extended treatment will be referred to an appropriate hospital.

BluePearl Veterinary Partners in Town Center will be open during the storm. If your pet has an emergency, call 757-499-5463.

 

Bonus content: What will happen to the animals at the zoo?
Find out here.

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As a reminder, Little Creek Veterinary Clinic is closed on Wednesday each week.

If your pet needs immediate medical attention while Dr. Miele is out of the office, please contact BluePearl Emergency Hospital at 757-499-5463.

BluePearl keeps us informed about your pet’s emergency medical care, and helps us keep your pet’s medical records complete.

For non-emergency situations, please Contact Us via internet, email [littlecreekvet@live.com], or phone [757-583-2619 — leave a message.] For those leaving a voice mail message, please be aware that we do not have Caller ID, so it is essential that you slowly and clearly say your preferred contact phone number.

Thank you — and keep in touch!

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It Pays to Test:
Why your Dog Needs an Annual Heartworm Check-up

Spring, summer, winter or fall — your pets need year-round prevention to keep them free of deadly heartworms and other parasites. While an annual heartworm check-up at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic is one of the best moves you can make as a responsible pet owner, it’s helpful to understand why heartworm testing and examinations are important.

My dog was just tested for heartworm a year ago. Why does he need a test again so soon?

Your dog should have a heartworm test once a year to determine if he became infected with heartworms during the previous season. It takes months before a dog with heartworm will test positive on a heartworm test, so testing annually — usually at the time the prescription for his heartworm medication is being renewed — makes sense. As with many diseases, the earlier heartworm can be diagnosed, the better the chances he will recover. If heartworm disease in a dog goes undetected and untreated, the worms can cause progressive and potentially fatal damage to his arteries, heart and lungs.

If my dog is on continuous heartworm prevention, why does he need to be tested?

That’s a logical question if you’re a responsible owner who keeps your dog on heartworm prevention year-round. The reason for annual testing of dogs in this case is to ensure his prevention program is working. Heartworm medications are highly effective, but dogs can still become infected.

Why? A common reason is simple forgetfulness. Missing just one dose of a monthly medication — or giving it late — can leave a dog unprotected. Even if you do everything right and on time, it’s no guarantee. Some dogs spit out their heartworm pills when their owners aren’t looking. Others may vomit their pills or rub off a topical heartworm medication. Whatever the cause of missing or delaying a dose, any of these mishaps can put your dog at risk of heartworm infection.

Click to enlarge


What else do I need to know about heartworms, testing, and prevention?

  1. Heartworm disease is easier to prevent than to treat. Prevention is a simple, once-a-month chewable treat or topical application plus an annual blood test. Treatment includes blood tests and Xrays or ultrasound; a course of antibiotics; a series of painful medication injections deep into the pet’s muscles near the spine; and strict confinement for a month. Treatment can pose its own set of health risks. And treating heartworm disease can cost more than 15 times the amount of a year’s worth of prevention. 
  2. Heartworms are spread by mosquitoes. There are 22 different mosquito species in the U.S. that carry heartworm, and they are active at different times of the day and year.
  3. A heartworm test requires just a few drops of blood, and you will receive the results of your dog’s test during the vet visit.
  4. If your pet develops heartworm disease while taking its preventative medication, the medication’s manufacturer may want to see proof of annual testing before they pay for your pet’s treatment.

Remember, the best offense against heartworm disease is a good defense.
Follow American Heartworm Society recommendations and Think 12 — give heartworm preventatives 12 months a year and test your dog every 12 months.

This article adapted from “It Pays to Test: Why Your Dog Needs an Annual Heartworm Check-up” by the American Heartworm Society.

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Attention Users of Feline Revolution: The free dose program has ended and has been replaced with a new purchase rewards program.

For every 3 doses purchased, you can earn points which convert to dollars, which are loaded onto a prepaid VISA card, once you’ve reached a minimum of 100 points (= $10). See program FAQs here.

Buy 6 doses, earn $15

Buy 9 doses, earn $25 

Buy 12 doses, earn $35

Registration is FREE. Sign up here:  https://www.zoetispetcare.com/rewards/offers/revolution

 

Why Revolution? We asked Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic:

Revolution is safe to use on cats and is especially recommended for those that venture outdoors. Your “outdoor” cat is exposed to more natural pests than a cat that stays inside.

But remember: certain pests, like mosquitoes and fleas, can easily migrate indoors, exposing your “indoor” cats to heartworms and tapeworms. And certain pests, like houseflies and cockroaches, can carry roundworms, exposing any pet that likes to eat bugs.

Also, cats that go outside can bring ear mites and intestinal worms indoors and share them with the homebodies.

Revolution protects your indoor and outdoor cats against:

Revolution is available to your 5-15 lb cat by prescription only. To schedule an appointment, Contact Us today.

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In addition to our usual Wednesday off,
Little Creek Veterinary Clinic will be closed
for a meeting, on Thursday afternoon this week.

Dr. Miele will be available for appointments on Thursday morning.

Regular appointment hours resume Friday, March 23rd.

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(As a reminder, we are closed on Wednesdays, unless otherwise stated.)

Enjoy the Labor Day weekend!

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     Veterinary Pet Insurance has done it again. They’ve mined their database to compile a profile of the most dangerous days in 2010. Here is a sample of what they discovered (keeping in mind these numbers reflect pets insured by VPI only):

  • The most dangerous day of the week was Monday, with an average of 152 pets treated for injuries.
  • The most dangerous month was June, with an average of just over 4140 claims. That works out to about 138 pets treated daily for each of the 30 days.
  • For the year, accident claims were highest after holidays like Labor Day, Memorial Day and Easter.

     The “safest” day of the week appeared to be Sunday, with statistics showing an average of only 59 claims on that day. However, a top VPI veterinarian is concerned that the low number actually reflects the lack of emergency care available on Sundays in some areas. In other words, cases that are seen on Monday should have been treated on Sunday, but an emergency facility was either unavailable or unknown to the pet owner.

     Can you guess the month with the fewest emergency claims? It was December, with about 108 pets treated each day, for an overall total of just under 3350 emergency claims for the month.

     VPI culled the information by reviewing its data on over 485,000 enrollees and looking at emergency claims like broken bones and poisoning, among others.

     Do you know the phone number and location of your local 24-hour veterinary emergency hospital? If you have a pet, this information is vital. We recommend the Tidewater Animal Emergency and Referral Center on South Independence Road in Virginia Beach. Keep their number in your speed dial: 757-499-5463.

~~Jen
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Information for this article can be found in the July 2011 edition of Veterinary Practice News, p.4.

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