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Posts Tagged ‘cats’

There are plenty of opportunities in June
to show your love for your pets (and wildlife).

American Humane’s Adopt-a-Cat Month®​

ASPCA’s Adopt a Shelter Cat Month

National Zoo and Aquarium Month​

National Dairy Month

Pet Appreciation Week
June 3-9
First full week in June

Hug Your Cat Day
June 4

World Oceans Day
June 8

World Pet Memorial Day
June 10
Second Sunday in June

​​National Pollinator Week​
June 18 – 24

Take Your Dog to Work Day
June 22

How will you celebrate?

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Today’s research shows that some respiratory illnesses in cats, previously believed to be feline asthma or bronchitis may actually be Heartworm Associated Respiratory Disease (HARD).

Heartworm larvae (immature worms) — spread through the bite of a mosquito — migrate to the cat’s lungs where they produce inflammation, leading to breathing difficulties.

Interestingly, dying larvae can also cause inflammation. A few larvae may grow to adulthood, but the death of adult heartworms can produce an inflammatory response so severe that it can cause sudden death in a cat.

KnowHeartworms.org has identified 13 signs that may indicate the presence of heartworms in a cat:

  • anorexia
  • blindness
  • collapse
  • convulsions
  • coughing
  • diarrhea
  • difficulty breathing
  • fainting
  • lethargy
  • rapid heart rate
  • sudden death
  • vomiting
  • weight loss

Other health problems (including kidney disease, Feline Leukemia, hyperthyroidism, and diabetes, among others) may cause some of the same symptoms listed above.

Adding to the confusion is the fact that heartworm disease is difficult to diagnose in cats — as compared to dogs, in which a simple blood test can detect the presence of worms.

And as previously mentioned, heartworm disease in cats is not curable.

However, heartworm disease and HARD are preventable, through the use of products like Revolution. The best time to start your cat on Revolution is before it develops symptoms of HARD

Healthy Dose of Savings 004

Revolution is designed to be safe for use in cats that may already be infected with heartworms, and it can prevent further infections. Revolution also protects cats from fleas, roundworms, hookworms, and ear mites.

If your cat is currently on a flea-only treatment, it is easy to switch to Revolution – just ask!

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Originally posted on April 18, 2013.

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New research shows that some respiratory illnesses in cats, previously believed to be feline asthma or bronchitis may actually be Heartworm Associated Respiratory Disease (HARD).

Heartworm larvae (immature worms) — spread through the bite of a mosquito — migrate to the cat’s lungs where they produce inflammation, leading to breathing difficulties.

Interestingly, dying larvae can also cause inflammation. A few larvae may grow to adulthood, but the death of adult heartworms can produce an inflammatory response so severe that it can cause sudden death in a cat.

KnowHeartworms.org has identified 13 signs that may indicate the presence of heartworms in a cat:

  • anorexia
  • blindness
  • collapse
  • convulsions
  • coughing
  • diarrhea
  • difficulty breathing
  • fainting
  • lethargy
  • rapid heart rate
  • sudden death
  • vomiting
  • weight loss

Other health problems (including kidney disease, Feline Leukemia, hyperthyroidism, and diabetes, among others) may cause some of the same symptoms listed above.

Adding to the confusion is the fact that heartworm disease is difficult to diagnose in cats — as compared to dogs, in which a simple blood test can detect the presence of worms.

And as previously mentioned, heartworm disease in cats is not curable.

However, heartworm disease and HARD are preventable, through the use of products like Revolution. The best time to start your cat on Revolution is before it develops symptoms of HARD

Healthy Dose of Savings 004

Revolution is designed to be safe for use in cats that may already be infected with heartworms, and it can prevent further infections. Revolution also protects cats from fleas, roundworms, hookworms, and ear mites.

If your cat is currently on a flea-only treatment, it is easy to switch to Revolution – just ask!

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     Recipe by Jen Fortman of Tender Care Animal Hospital, Prairie Du Chien, WI.  Reprinted from Protector, a Merial publication.


Kitty Catfish Pie

Ingredients
For crust, mix:

  • 1/2 cup oatmeal
  • 1/4 cup wheat germ
  • 1/4 cup soy flour
  • 1/2 cup bran
  • 1/8 cup corn oil

You’ll also need:

  • 1/2 pound catfish
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1 tablespoon spinach
  • 1 teaspoon parsley
  • 1/4 teaspoon kelp

     Mix crust and press into a small pie dish.  Place in refrigerator until ready to use.

     Cut catfish into small pieces and arrange onto crust.  Mix the milk in blender with eggs, spinach, parsley and kelp. 

     Pour mixture over catfish and bake 30 minutes at 350° Fahrenheit. 

     Cool and serve upside down.  May serve several cats or keep refrigerated for a couple of days.
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This recipe is intended for cats which are not allergic to the ingredients listed.

 

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     Weather experts warn that the extreme high temperatures and humidity we’ve been experiencing will continue over the weekend.

     You may have noticed that stepping outside is like opening the door to a blast furnace.  And according to the weather report at WVEC Channel 13, Friday’s temperature will feel like 110° Fahrenheit.  Now imagine living outdoors wearing a fur coat all day – that’s what it’s like for our pets.

     Please keep pets indoors and provide fans or air conditioning during these days of extreme heat and humidity.  Provide cool water, as well.  Pets should not be exercised outdoors and bathroom break time should be limited, if possible. 

     Remember, pug-nosed dogs such as Pekingese, Lhasa Apsos, Chinese Pugs, and Boston Terriers (to name a few) have greater difficulty cooling the air they breathe in, due to a shortened snout.  For this reason, they are very susceptible to heat stroke.

     To learn more about the signs of heat stroke or heat stress in pets, see our blog post here.

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Coax your cat out of hiding and schedule her check-up today.

     If it’s been a year or more since your cat had a check-up, it’s time to get her to the vet.  Here are some tips to make the veterinary visits more pleasant for you and your cat:

  • Start with a carrier that is easy to take your cat in and out of (top-loading carriers work best.)
  • Help your cat be more comfortable in the car by using the carrier and taking shorter rides to places other than the veterinary clinic.
  • Avoid feeding your cat for several hours before riding in the car (cats travel better on an empty stomach.)
  • Bring your cat’s favorite treats and toys with you to the veterinary clinic.
  • Practice regular care routines at home, like grooming, nail trimming and teeth brushing.
  • Pretend to do routine veterinary procedures with your cat, like touching the cat’s face, ears, feet and tail.
  • Give your cat and the veterinary healthcare team a chance to interact in a less stressful situation by taking your cat to the clinic for a weight check, rather than only for exams and procedures.

     These tips are available at our office in the Pet Owner Guide “Have We Seen Your Cat Lately?” from BI Vetmedica.

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June is Adopt-A-Cat Month, so with that in mind, we present these 10 Tips for Adopting a Cat, courtesy of the American Humane Association, the American Veterinary Medical Association, CATalyst Council, and PetFinder.

1. Consider more than one cat. Cats require exercise, mental stimulation, and social interaction. Two cats can provide this for each other.

2. Find a cat whose personality meshes with yours. In general, cats with long hair and round heads and bodies are more easygoing than lean cats with narrow heads and short hair, who are typically more active. Adoption counselors can offer advice to help you match the individual cat’s personality with your own.

3. Schedule a veterinary visit within the first few days after the adoption. Make sure to bring along any medical records you received from the adoption center. According to Dr. Larry Kornegay, president of the AVMA, getting your new cat to a veterinarian early will help make sure there are no underlying illnesses or injuries and allow you to develop a plan to help your new pet live the happiest, healthiest, longest life possible.

4. Make sure everyone in the house is prepared for a new cat. Visiting the shelter or animal control facility should be a family affair. When adopting a new cat to join your existing pets, discuss with the adoption facility or your veterinarian how to make a proper introduction.

5. Budget for both short-term and long-term costs. A cat adopted from a shelter may be a bargain, considering many shelters provide spaying or neutering, initial vaccines, and a microchip. But make sure you’re prepared for the routine expenses you’ll incur throughout the cat’s life.

6. Stock up on supplies before the cat arrives. Try to create a homelike environment for your new cat right away. You’ll need a litter box, litter, food and water bowls, food, scratching posts, safe and stimulating toys, a cushy bed, a brush for grooming, a toothbrush, and nail clippers.

7. Cat-proof your home. A new cat will quickly teach you not to leave things lying out. Food left on the kitchen counter will teach your new friend to jump on counters for a possible lunch. Get rid of loose items your cat might chew on, make sure the cat isn’t chewing on electrical cords, and pick up random items like paper clips, which kittens may swallow.

8. Go slowly when introducing your cat to new friends and family. It can take several weeks for a cat to relax in a new environment. It’s a great idea to keep the new addition secluded in a single room with all of its supplies until it’s used to the new surroundings. Socialization is important, but remember: take it slow.

9. Include your new pet in your family’s emergency plan. Add phone numbers for your veterinarian and closest 24-hour animal hospital to your “in-case-of-emergency” call list, and be sure to have a several-day supply of cat food and medications on hand.

10. Think twice before giving a cat as a gift. While it’s a nice thought, surprising someone with a cat doesn’t allow for a “get-to-know-one-another” period. Remember, adopting a cat isn’t like purchasing a household appliance or a piece of jewelry—this is a real living, breathing, and emotional being.

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