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Posts Tagged ‘cat vaccines’

Previously, on the Little Creek Veterinary Clinic blog, we discussed the importance of yearly check-ups for cats. Cats benefit from wellness care and from early intervention when you notice signs of trouble. [Click the link above to review the list.]

However, we have heard from owners who would rather avoid bringing their cat to the doctor, if the cat appears healthy. Common sticking points for owners are that their cat puts up a fuss at going into the carrier, leaving the house, going for a car ride, or being handled by the veterinary team (whom the cat sees infrequently.)

But since you know that yearly health check-ups and preventative care, such as vaccinations and parasite control, are important components of pet care, you’ll want to find a way to make getting your cat to the vet easier and less stressful — for you and your pet.

Try these tips from BI-Vetmedica, available in a brochure at our office:

  • Start with a carrier that is easy to take your cat in and out of (top-loading carriers work best.)
  • Help your cat be more comfortable in the car by using the carrier and taking shorter rides to places other than the veterinary clinic.
  • Avoid feeding your cat for several hours before riding in the car (cats travel better on an empty stomach.)
  • Bring your cat’s favorite treats and toys with you to the veterinary clinic.
  • Practice regular care routines at home, like grooming, nail trimming and teeth brushing.
  • Pretend to do routine veterinary procedures with your cat, like touching the cat’s face, ears, feet and tail.
  • Give your cat and the veterinary healthcare team a chance to interact in a less stressful situation by taking your cat to the clinic for a weight check, rather than only for exams and procedures.

Bonus Tip 1: Leave the cat carrier out where your cat can access and explore it. Put a blanket and toy or treats in the carrier, and allow your cat to nap in its comfy little nest. Encourage your cat to become accustomed to the carrier as a “happy place.”

Bonus Tip 2: Spritz the inside of the carrier with Feliway synthetic calming pheromone 15 minutes before you place your cat in it for the ride to the vet. Then spray Feliway on a towel and place the towel over the carrier in the car and at the veterinary clinic. 

Check out these extra ideas from Catster.com.

Angell Animal Medical Center has produced this video as a guide to placing your cat in its carrier.

Ready to make your cat’s veterinary appointment? Contact Us to let us know!

 

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Cats can be such quiet, independent creatures that it is easy to forget they need regular doctor visits, just like dogs.

Cats should receive a yearly check-up, fecal analysis, and vaccine boosters. And remember to pick up their flea and heartworm preventatives (such as Revolution)!

Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, says the good news is, certain conditions viral diseases and parasite infestation can be prevented or quickly treated — but aging brings its own problems, and you can’t stop the sands of time. That’s why it’s important to combine careful observation with annual veterinary check-ups.

Cats are notorious for hiding pain and illness, but you can use your detective skills to know when there’s a problem.

Look for these signs — and Contact Us at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic to request a brochure with detailed information on each:

  • Peeing or pooping outside the litterbox
  • Becoming less social
  • Decrease in activity
  • Changes in sleep habits
  • Increase or decrease in food and water consumption
  • Unexplained weight loss or gain
  • Over-grooming or under-grooming
  • Howling; increased vocalization
  • Bad breath

Remember: you don’t have to wait for your cat to be sick before scheduling a visit with the veterinarian!

Coming up next: What you can do to prepare your cat for veterinary visits.

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On Tuesday, we learned about the combination of vaccines that make up the canine DHPP booster, commonly referred to as “the distemper shot.” Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends that all dogs living in the Hampton Roads region receive their distemper-combo booster, along with the Rabies vaccine. The distemper-combo booster protects dogs against the most common, and deadly, canine diseases.

Cats also receive a cocktail of vaccinations, typically rolled into one shot. Since many cats are allowed to roam outdoors unsupervised, it is especially important to keep cats vaccinated against Rabies and other diseases. This is a closer look at the components of the FVRCCP vaccine, sometimes known as the “feline distemper shot.”

FVR is for Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, aka Feline Herpesvirus-1, a severe upper respiratory disease that, once contracted, often remains in the cat’s body. Recurrent outbreaks throughout the cat’s life are common. Signs include fever, congestion, runny eyes and nose, sores and crusts on the face, lip ulcers, mouth breathing, coughing, sneezing, and drooling. Vaccination helps reduce the severity of signs.

C is for Calicivirus, an upper respiratory disease that can cause fever, blisters on the tongue, and may turn into pneumonia.

C is for Chlamydiosis, a bacterial respiratory infection that is highly contagious. Signs include conjunctivitis, sneezing, runny eyes, excessive drooling, and coughing.

P is for Feline Panleukopenia, aka Feline Distemper, a contagious virus that causes fever, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, depression, dehydration, and can lead to death.

Is your cat due or past due to receive its booster vaccinations? Contact Us to schedule an appointment with our veterinarian today!

Note: Other vaccines are available to cats, including Rabies and Feline Leukemia. However, those vaccines are given in a separate injection and, for our purposes, are not considered part of the distemper combinations.

Lg Caduceus

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Have we seen your cat lately?

Most of us think of our cats as self-sustaining little creatures (except when it comes to using a can opener) — but the truth is, cats need vet care just like dogs.

Cats are especially stoic and will often hide signs of disease or illness until the problem becomes serious. An annual exam can help catch problems in the early stages. And even if a disease or physical disorder is not evident at the time of the exam, the veterinarian can remind you what to look for throughout the year and make health recommendations based on your cat’s age and living conditions.

If more than a year has passed since your cat had an examination, it’s time to get him to the vet.

Quick questions: Are your cat’s vaccines (including Rabies) up-to-date? When was the last time your outdoor cat’s stool was tested for parasites?

Now, take note of your cat’s everyday habits and appearance (especially cats older than 7):

  • Does it use the litterbox or has your cat begun urinating and defecating in inappropriate areas?
  • Does your cat urinate more frequently or in larger amounts than usual?
  • Does your cat eat and drink more or less than it used to?
  • Has your cat gained or lost a significant amount of weight?
  • Does your cat sleep longer hours than usual?
  • Does your cat howl or vocalize more often, especially at night?
  • Have you noticed any lumps, bumps, sores or other skin irregularities on your cat?
  • Are its eyes bright and shiny or cloudy and dull?
  • Are its ears clean and pale pink or crusty, bloody, or filled with dark wax?
  • Are its teeth clean and white or brown and coated with tartar?
  • Does your cat have foul, stinky breath?
  • Is your cat’s fur shiny and smooth or dull and spiky?
  • Does your cat have trouble jumping onto its favorite perch or climbing stairs?
  • Does your cat have fleas or Tapeworms?

Let’s get together and talk about your cat’s health:  load your cat into its carrier and bring her in for a check-up. Make notes of your concerns, so we address the changes you’re seeing in your cat at home.

One last tip: your cat’s toenails need regular trimming if she is not wearing them down on a scratching post. Learn how to clip your pet’s nails or ask us to trim them on your next visit.

Mischievous kittens at play in our office.

Mischievous kittens at play in our office.

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