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Posts Tagged ‘Bulldogs’

Over the past couple of weeks, we’ve been talking about what you should do in the event of a pet poisoning emergency. (Click the links to refresh your memory.)

Today, we’ll hit upon a topic that likely has many people confused: if a pet ingests a toxic substance, should the pet be made to vomit in order to rid its body of the toxin?

Here is what the experts at Pet Poison Helpline and Veterinary Pet Insurance want you to know:

  • If your pet is already showing signs of poisoning, it’s too late to induce vomiting.
  • If your pet has certain medical problems (like laryngeal paralysis or brachycephalic syndrome), inducing vomiting is not recommended and can make your pet’s condition worse.
  • Certain toxins (such as corrosive cleaners and hydrocarbons such as gasoline, paint thinners and kerosene) should NOT be brought back up. Inducing vomiting after the ingestion of these products may ultimately cause more harm than good.

The smartest thing you can do in the event of a suspected poisoning is to call the Pet Poison Helpline (855-764-7661) for advice and then take your pet to the nearest pet emergency hospital.

Est. 1973Coming Thursday:  If your pet throws up this chemical, it can be deadly to people.

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     One of the most serious risks of leaving a pet outdoors during the summer is Heat Stress.  Heat Stress occurs when the pet’s body is unable to cool itself, resulting in dehydration, brain damage, organ failure, even death. 

This guy knows how to chill out in a cool pool.

     Most pet owners are aware of the danger in leaving a pet in a parked car for even a few minutes.  However, pets left outdoors without adequate cool shelter are also at risk.  Purina provides the following tips and advice:

     “Any pet can suffer from heat stress.  However, particularly susceptible are:

  • Very young and older pets
  • Pets with a previous history of heat stress
  • Short-nosed [pug-nosed] breeds (Bulldogs, Pugs, Lhasa Apsos, etc.)
  • Overweight pets
  • Pets with cardiovascular or respiratory disorders

     Help prevent heat stress by:

  • Providing plenty of clean, fresh water for your pet at all times*
  • Providing adequate ventilation and air circulation when pets are kept in kennels or pens
  • Providing shade cover when pets are outdoors
  • Avoiding excessive exercise of pets during hot weather
  • Never leaving pets in parked vehicles

     “Some signs of heat stress are profuse panting and salivation, staring or an anxious expression, failure to respond to commands, warm dry skin, rapid heartbeat, fatigue, muscular weakness or collapse.
     “If your pet has heat stress, try to reduce his temperature by gradually immersing your pet in cool water, spraying him with cool water or applying ice packs to his head and neck.  Then take your pet to the veterinarian immediately.”

     *Keep in mind that water left outdoors (especially in metal bowls) can become too hot to drink or provide any cooling benefit.  Check and change the water often.

     Heat stress is a life-threatening emergency.  If you suspect your pet has heat stress, we recommend taking him to the nearest emergency hospital for comprehensive care.

[Purina’s booklet of Spring and Summer Pet Care Tips is available at our office.]

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This article was originally posted on June 10, 2011.
Photo:  Search and Rescue dog FloJo cools off after a training session in Florida.  Photo by Leif Skoogfors.  From the FEMA Photo Library, via Wikimedia Commons.

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