Posts Tagged ‘batteries’

During the holidays, batteries abound, because so many of the gadgets we buy for ourselves and our loved ones run on AA, D-cells, 9-volts, button batteries, and more.

But if those shiny objects look like candy to your dog or cat, you could be in for a shock: batteries can cause painful burns and ulcers inside your pet and may require a special procedure to remove them if they become lodged in your pet’s body.

remote control with batteries

Has the remote become your pet’s new favorite chew toy? That could be a real problem!

Alkaline batteries, which are often used to power common items like toys, electronics, remote controls, and clocks, contain potassium hydroxide, which can destroy delicate tissues and cause ulcers if ingested. Although early signs of damage can appear within 1-2 hours, further damage can occur over the first 24 hours after contact.† This includes injury from a pet chewing the battery, but not necessarily swallowing the pieces.

Disc batteries, which power hearing aids, watches, car key fobs, greeting cards, toys, and more, are very easy for your pet to swallow whole or chew into small pieces. They can also cause burns and possibly become stuck inside your pet’s body.

As a result of chewing or eating batteries, your pet may need Xrays to locate the pieces, bloodwork to determine how his health may be affected, or a special procedure to remove the battery if it is stuck inside your pet’s body.

Along with testing and any special procedures, your pet’s doctor may prescribe pain medication, antibiotics, fluids, and special medications used to treat ulcers.

†Monitoring for further complications following battery ingestion can last as long as 6 weeks, while pets recover at home.

What you might see if your pet chews or swallows a battery:

  • grey, white, or red burns in your pet’s mouth
  • swelling inside the mouth
  • difficulty eating or swallowing food
  • drooling
  • wheezing / noisy breathing / difficulty breathing
  • vomiting
  • lethargy / reluctance to move
  • pain at the mouth or abdomen

What to do if your dog or cat chews or eats a battery:
Call your local veterinary emergency hospital or animal poison control hotline for guidance [see references below], as soon as you become aware that your pet ate or may have eaten or chewed a battery. Since injury can continue to occur for some time after the initial exposure to potassium hydroxide, immediate action is key to a good outcome. In other words — don’t wait!

Prevent battery snacking!
This holiday season — and all year-round — be mindful of the items within your curious or hungry pet’s reach.

Pets that like to dig through the trash can may chew up a greeting card or used battery they find there. Children’s animatronic stuffed animals may look similar to a pet’s chew toy and pose a danger with their batteries and stuffing.

Take an inventory of each room and try to identify the objects within your pet’s reach, that contain batteries of any type or size. You may be surprised!

Even pets that don’t have a history of eating or chewing non-food items may suddenly develop interest in a new object, according to Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian.

Bottom line: Don’t let battery ingestion be a drain on your pet’s health!

Note: This article is not a substitute for medical care. It is not meant to diagnose, treat, or cure any condition. If you believe your pet is exhibiting signs of illness or injury, contact your regular veterinarian or veterinary emergency hospital right away.


Keep these numbers handy for emergencies –
Blue Pearl Emergency [hospital] in Virginia Beach 757-499-5463
Pet Poison Helpline 1-855-764-7661 [$59 fee charged to your credit card*]
ASPCA Animal Poison Control 1-888-426-4435 [a fee may be charged to your credit card]

*This fee is current as of the date of this post.


Link: https://www.aspca.org/news/dangers-batteries-and-your-pets-what-you-should-know

 

 

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