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Posts Tagged ‘animals’

Plan to spend a couple of hours watching a family-friendly movie on Friday in the (nearby) company of lions, zebras, and giraffes. That’s right — it’s time for…

Zoovies

ZOOVIES!

The Virginia Zoo, Monarch Bank and Special Events Virginia present Zoovies, a family movie night at the Zoo, this Friday, Sept. 6, featuring “A Bug’s Life.”

Spread a blanket under the stars, and enjoy a family-friendly film at the Virginia Zoo. Gates open at 6:30 p.m. and the movie begins at dark. Snacks and refreshments will be available for purchase. 

This event is FREE for Zoo Members! Zoovies general admission is $5 for ages 2 and up.

Tickets are only available after 6:30 p.m. at the Zoo entrance on movie night.

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From my inbox:
ZooGrooves10742_300x100_TICKET
ZOO GROOVES IS BACK!
Saturday, June 22, 5:30 p.m.
 
Get ready for a rockin’ good time with tunes from the 50s and 60s at the Zoo on Saturday, June 22.
 
The Virginia Zoo, in partnership with the Chrysler Museum of Art, Monarch Bank and Troutman Sanders, kick off the 2013 Zoo Grooves summer concert series with The Rhondels; a variety band featuring music from artists like Elvis Presley, The Temptations and more!
 
It’s a fun and family-friendly environment to enjoy music, share some of your favorite summer foods, splash in the water fountains and take a Zoo Train ride.
 
Gates open at 5:30 p.m. and performances begin at 6:00 p.m.
 
General Zoo admission applies for non-members – Adults: $11, Children: $9 and Seniors: $10 – but Zoo members get in FREE! Members of the Chrysler Museum get half off admission. Refreshments will be available for purchase until 8:00 p.m.
 
Join us for our final Zoo Grooves 2013 summer concert:
Saturday, August 24 – The Deloreans – 80s Pop
 
No outside food or beverages are permitted inside the Zoo. Zoo Grooves concert events will take place as scheduled, rain or shine. No other discounts, coupons or passes will be accepted for this event.

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Happy for the cozy temperatures and blue skies we’ve been blessed with the past two weekends, I took the opportunity to twice visit one of my favorite free parks in Virginia — Windsor Castle Park in Smithfield; and I got to know an area that’s new to me — the Mariners’ Museum Park  in Newport News.

I began two Saturdays ago by visiting Windsor Castle Park, just a short drive down the highway from a farm in Suffolk where I take weekend horseback riding lessons. I’ve learned that one of the best things I can do for myself after riding is to go for a nice long walk, to ward off next-day muscle soreness.

Keeper, my lesson horse at Indian Point Farm. Photo by Jennifer Miele.

Keeper, my lesson horse at Indian Point Farm. Photo by Jennifer Miele.

At the park, I kept an eye out for wildlife slightly more exotic than the ubiquitous squirrels. To my delight, I caught sight of a nutria swimming around in the marsh. 

Water rat

He’s larger than he looks! Photo by Jen Miele.

Also spotted, but not photographed: hawks, turkey vultures, and fiddler crabs. I did get a kick out of two squirrels playing a game of tag. The game ended abruptly when Squirrel A jumped up on a bridge, saw me standing there, then turned around and high-tailed it up a tree. Squirrel B (the chaser) had already spotted me and took off in the opposite direction.

The real wildlife worth watching that day were the slightly buzzed folks returning from the Annual Smithfield Wine and Brew Fest held at the park. After chatting up some friendly locals, I turned my attention back to the marshes.

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Windsor Castle Park. Photo by Jen Miele.

Windsor Castle Park. Photo by Jen Miele.

Windsor Castle Park. Photo by Jen Miele.

The next day, I toured the “Working South” exhibit at the Peninsula Fine Arts Center, then set out on the nearby Noland Trail at Mariners’ Museum Park, having forgotten my water bottle, not dressed for hiking, and not realizing the trail is 5 miles long. But I did bring my camera.

Dogwood blossom, Mariners' Museum Park, Newport News, VA. Photo by Jen Miele.

Dogwood blossom, Mariners’ Museum Park, Newport News, VA. Photo by Jen Miele.

Lake Maury. Photo by Jennifer Miele.

Lake Maury. Photo by Jennifer Miele.

Long-leggedy beastie sneaking around the pool. Photo by Jen Miele.

Long-leggedy beastie sneaking around the pool. Photo by Jen Miele.

Hungry turtle. Photo by Jen Miele.

Hungry turtle. Photo by Jen Miele.

This past Saturday, I returned to Windsor Castle Park and cleaned up on the animal sightings. There was yet another (or possibly the same) nutria, for starters.

My camera battery was giving up the ghost, so here is a list of animals I saw and did not photograph: a red-winged blackbird, a goose, turkey vultures, cormorants, cardinals, a skink, turtles, little fish that stay underwater and larger, splashy ones that breach the surface whenever I look the other way.

Sunlight sparkles on the surface of Cypress Creek. Photo by Jen Miele.

Sunlight sparkles on the surface of Cypress Creek. Photo by Jen Miele.

I did capture this heron standing by the shore:

Egret on Cypress Creek. Photo by Jen Miele.

Egret on Cypress Creek. Photo by Jen Miele.

Continuing down the path, I enjoyed the view.

Natural beauty. Photo by Jen Miele.

Natural beauty. Photo by Jen Miele.

Cypress Creek at Windsor Castle Park. Photo by Jen Miele,

Cypress Creek at Windsor Castle Park. Photo by Jen Miele,

Finally — and the absolute highlight of my day — I met the Princess of Windsor Castle Park:

Trail buddy. Photo by Jen Miele.

Trail buddy. Photo by Jen Miele.

Far from being bad luck, Princess was the perfect traveling companion. Though strangers at first, we snuggled on a bench at the end of a pier and admired the view, including the egret pictured earlier. A vulture circled above, then swooped down low to get a better look at us. Just as I was pondering the absence of cormorants in the park, one of the jet-black birds flew overhead.

Adding to the drama, a slate-grey military ‘copter hacked its way through the air over us, using Cypress Creek as its flight path. (Cue “Paint it, Black” by the Rolling Stones.) I waved to the occupants of the helicopter, and I like to think they smiled and waved back at the girl sitting on a bench over the water, cuddling a black cat.

Finally, I’d like to share yet another tree-hugger photo, proving once again that the most dedicated tree-huggers in the world actually live in the forest:

Is this how trees reproduce? Photo by Jen Miele.

Is this how trees reproduce? Photo by Jen Miele.

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Few things are as unsettling to pet owners as discovering a medical condition which had not been in evidence a day or only hours earlier.   


      One problem that seems to arise quite suddenly is an ear flap hematoma.  A hematoma is the accumulation of blood and serum between the cartilage and skin of the dog’s or cat’s ear flap.  The resultant swelling causes the ear to look like a floppy balloon or a pillow.   

    A  hematoma of the ear often arises as the result of trauma, whether caused by the pet’s vigorous head shaking, scratching the ear, or smacking the ear on a hard surface when shaking the head.  The head shaking and scratching have their own underlying causes:  fleas, ear mites, ear infections, or debris collecting on the eardrum.

     After the underlying cause of the hematoma has been addressed, the doctor will determine the appropriate treatment for the swollen ear.  A combination of medication, aspiration of the fluid, or surgical repair may be recommended. 

     Ear flap hematomas can recur after medication or aspiration, though rarely after surgical intervention.  If medication-only treatment is chosen due to economic circumstances or because the pet is a poor anesthesia risk, the hematoma will usually resolve over a number of weeks.  Patience is key in this instance, and the veterinarian will want to monitor the ear for progress.

     A hematoma is unlikely to resolve itself absent medical intervention.  For your pet’s sake, keep in mind that a swollen ear flap can be painful, and it can cause your pet to tilt its head to one side constantly or dig at the ear and worsen the problem. If you suspect your pet has an ear flap hematoma, be sure to seek treatment early, for the best results.
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This article was originally posted on November 2, 2010.

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Lil’ Pals Pet Photography will return on September 14th. Look for their tricked-out RV in the parking lot next door, at Robin’s Grooming Nest.

Portrait sessions will take place inside the RV, so your pet can shine even when the sun doesn’t. More good news: the sitting fee is only $10 for this event! Space is limited, so call 540-903-3895 for your appointment today.

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Schedule Update:  Dr. Miele will be out of the office on Wednesday, September 12th. Our office will be open limited hours in the morning and afternoon for retail sales and patient information. Remember, we are unable to prescribe, authorize, or dispense medications in the doctor’s absence.
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Advantage II Special Reminder: The “Buy 1 pack – get 1 tube free” offer ends on September 29th. Stock up on flea control while there’s still time! 
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Sentinel Update:  Novartis, the makers of Sentinel, have begun manufacturing some medications at their newly-renovated plant. However, they still must test the new products for quality control and are not yet ready to release any medications for sale. At this time, there is no known release date for medications including Sentinel, Interceptor, Clomicalm, or Deramaxx. You can learn more about Novartis’s decision to temporarily shut down its plant here.

Good news: You can save money on future purchases of Sentinel with a special voucher provided by your veterinarian. Ask your vet for the voucher, then register it online before November 1, 2012, to be eligible for a rebate when product is available again. Instructions are included on the voucher, so get yours today!

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Some Pet Owners Opt for Quirkiness Over Conventional When Selecting Monikers

Brea, Calif. (July 25, 2012) – “Bella” and “Max” once again topped the list of most popular pet names last year, but there are thousands of pet owners who look for more originality when naming their furry, four-legged friends. Veterinary Pet Insurance Co. (VPI), the nation’s oldest and largest provider of pet health insurance, celebrates the most clever, creative and quirky pet names nationwide. After a thorough selection process, 50 unusual dog names and 50 unusual cat names were chosen from VPI’s database of more than 485,000 insured pets and narrowed down with a vote for the 10 most unusual names in each category. Following are the 10 Wackiest Dog and Cat Names of 2012:

 
Dogs   Cats
1. Chew Barka   1. Pico de Gato
2. Nigel Nosewhistle   2. Dingleberry
3. Sir Maui Senqkey Schwykle   3. Dumpster Kitty
4. Spark Pug   4. Schnickelfritz
5. Agent 99   5. Koobenfarben
6. Stinker Belle   6. Sassy Pants Huska
7. Vienna Sausage   7. Vincent Van Furrball
8. Furnace Hills Dante   8. Kitty Gaga
9. Senorita Margarita   9. Beefra
10. Trigonometry   10. Mister Bigglesworth

For the full lists of 50 unusual dog and cat names, pictures of pets that made the Top 10, and the stories behind their unusual names, visit www.wackypetnames.com.

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About Veterinary Pet Insurance

With more than 485,000 pets insured nationwide, Veterinary Pet Insurance Co./DVM Insurance Agency (VPI) is a member of the Nationwide Insurance family of companies and is the oldest and largest pet health insurance company in the United States. Since 1982, VPI has helped provide pet owners with peace of mind and is committed to being the trusted choice of America’s pet lovers.

VPI Pet Insurance plans cover dogs, cats, birds and exotic pets for multiple medical problems and conditions relating to accidents, illnesses and injuries. CareGuard® coverage for routine care is available for an additional premium. Medical plans are available in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Additionally, nearly 3,000 companies nationwide offer VPI Pet Insurance as an employee benefit. Policies are offered and administered by Veterinary Pet Insurance Company in California and DVM Insurance Agency in all other states. Underwritten by Veterinary Pet Insurance Company (CA), Brea, CA, an A.M. Best A rated company (2012); National Casualty Company (all other states), Madison, WI, an A.M. Best A+ rated company (2012). Pet owners can find VPI Pet Insurance on Facebook or follow @VPI on Twitter. For more information about VPI Pet Insurance, call 800-USA-PETS (800-872-7387) or visit petinsurance.com.

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     In medicine, health problems are often described by using a combination of a word element referring to a body part/system/activity plus a word element referring to the condition of that part/system/activity.

     For instance, when we combine dys (difficult) + phagia (swallowing), we get dysphagia (difficulty swallowing.)
Or: ot (ear) + itis (inflammation) = otitis (inflammation of the ear.)
Or: hypo (abnormally decreased) + glycemia (presence of glucose in the blood) = hypoglycemia (abnormally decreased level of glucose in the blood.)

     This is by no means a complete list, but it can start you on the path to understanding disease names and medical jargon.

cephal(o)-….head
crypt(o)-…..concealed
ger(o)-………old age
hyper-………abnormally increased, excessive
hypo-………..abnormally decreased, deficient
oste(o)-……..bone
ot(o)-………..ear
dys-………….bad, difficult, disordered
hem(o)-……..blood
path(o)-…….disease
poly-…………many, much
pseudo-……..false
rhin(o)-………nose

Common Suffixes
-gram…….written, recorded
-iasis……..state, condition
-itis………..inflammation
-lysis……..dissolution
-oid……….resembling
-ology…….a branch of learning
-oma………tumor
-osis………disease, abnormal increase
-pathy…….morbid condition, disease (without inflammation)
-phagia…..eating, swallowing
-trophy……growth, development

Shortcuts to other Medical Definition entries:

Colorful Definitions

Parts Department

Sounds Like Trouble

Triage

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Resource: Saunders Comprehensive Veterinary Dictionary, Second Edition

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