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Posts Tagged ‘Animal Poison Control’

3 Weird Pet Problems You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

As a pet owner, you do your best to protect your pet from typical known hazards, such as diseases, traffic, heat stroke, and the like…but there are some weird problems pets can come up with that you’ve probably never heard of. For example:

  1. Tick bite paralysis…While not very common, this very real condition occurs when a female tick releases a toxin into a dog while feeding. Signs of tick bite paralysis show up 6-9 days after a tick has attached itself to a dog. The toxin affects the nerves carrying signals between the spinal cord and muscles. [Cats are less frequently affected by this toxin.]
    It is important to find and remove all ticks on the affected dog — and to bring the pet to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for treatment, especially if the pet is having trouble breathing.
    What are the early warning signs of tick-bite paralysis? Read this article to get the full scoop.
  2. Water intoxication…According to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, water intoxication, though rare, usually occurs during the warmer months when pets spend time at the beach or in a pool.
    Signs of water intoxication include nausea, vomiting, lethargy, difficulty breathing, and a swollen belly. In severe cases, the pet may be weak, unable to walk properly (stumbling), have seizures, have an abnormally slow heart rate, exhibit hypothermia (low body temperature), or even go into a coma.
    Pets that are suspected of having water intoxication should be taken to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for life-saving treatment.

    Which pets are most at risk for water intoxication? Read this article to find out.
  3. Toxic vomit…If your pet eats a rodent poison containing zinc phosphide, the chemical can mix with stomach acids and water to create dangerous phosphine gas. If your pet vomits, the gas is released into the air, which can lead to poisoning in people and pets. Phosphine gas can smell like garlic or rotting fish — or it may be odorless.
    If you suspect your pet has ingested rodent poison, call the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (1-888-426-4435) and take your pet to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for treatment.
    Which poisons contain the ingredient zinc phosphide? Read this article to get the list.

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This article is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or suggest a treatment for any disease or disorder. This article is not a substitute for veterinary care or a client-doctor-patient relationship, nor does it constitute such a relationship. Your pet’s veterinarian is the best source of information regarding your pet’s health.

Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff is responsible for outcomes based on information available on this site.

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Did you know the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals [aka, ASPCA] operates a Poison Control Center? It’s true. If your pet ingests something toxic, get advice from trained professionals by calling their 24-hour Hotline at 1-888-426-4435. Have your credit card available, as there is a fee for service.

Recently, the ASPCA Poison Control Center mined its data to discover the Top Ten Animal Toxin calls that it received in 2017, based on 199,000 cases.

Top Ten Animal Toxins of 2017 – Click to enlarge

 

 

 

1. Human prescription medications: 17.5%

2. Over-the-counter medications: 17.4%

3. Food: 10.9%

4. Veterinary products: 8.9%

5. Chocolate: 8.8%

6. Household items: 8.6%

7. Insecticides: 6.7%

8. Rodenticides: 6.3%

9. Plants: 5.4%

10. Garden products: 2.6%

On your next visit to Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, pick up a brochure on 101 household items that can be harmful to your pet!

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Victorian003

Tonight is the first night of the Easter Triduum:  Holy Thursday, Good Friday, and Holy Saturday, which bring Lent to an end and begin the Easter Season.

Since I won’t be posting on Sunday, allow me this opportunity to wish you all a very Happy Easter.

 

P1060663

As for the pet-related content, remember that chocolate (especially dark chocolate, unsweetened chocolate and unsweetened cocoa powder) and candies containing the artificial sweetener Xylitol are especially toxic to pets.

We have a Chocolate Toxicity Wheel provided by the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, which assists the veterinarian in determining the relative risk of chocolate ingestion in dogs. But let’s be honest: it’s better if we never have to use it! Keep those Easter treats of out your pet’s reach.

 

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Q:  What happens when you combine your pet’s thyroid pills with your blood pressure medication?

A:  You don’t want to find out.

And you don’t have to. For safety’s sake, always use a separate pill splitter for your pet’s medication. If you share, some pill dust may remain behind on the splitter, inadvertently exposing you to your pet’s drugs or exposing your pet to your medication.

Though the risk of cross-contamination may be small, it’s not a risk worth taking.

We recommend our combo pill splitter/crusher to better enable you to conceal medication in your pet’s food. As a bonus, it is unlikely to look like the device you use for your own meds, so there’s no confusing the two.

The brand we carry has a splitter

a crusher 

and compartments for holding small quantities of pills.

Take it apart for easy cleaning 

then snap it back together for easy storage. 

Pick one up on your next visit to our clinic!

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Pet poisoning from human drug ingestion is a common occurrence. 
Keep these numbers on hand in the event of a poisoning emergency:

Pet Poison Helpline……………………………………1-800-213-6680

ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center……….1-888-426-4435

BluePearl Veterinary Emergency Hospital….757-499-5463

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Quick links to past articles on pets and medication.

Tylenol toxicity

Top Toxic Human Medications

 

 

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     If you’ve noticed mushrooms sprouting in the yard, pull them up and dispose of them in a tightly lidded trash can.  Depending on the variety of mushrooms, ingestion can lead to gastrointestinal upset, seizures, even death.

 

     Although dogs are more likely to sample the fungus among us, cats are at risk, also.  Signs of mushroom toxicosis include vomiting, diarrhea, and excessive drooling.  More serious signs to watch for are convulsions, muscle spasms, and fly-biting seizures (snapping at the air.) Pets can also develop serious kidney and liver disorders as a result of eating mushrooms.

 

 

     If you think your pet has ingested mushrooms, take him to the emergency hospital.  If you are able to locate a piece of the mushroom in question, wrap it in paper towels and carry it in a paper (not plastic) bag to show the vet. 

 

Source:  Article by Dennis Blodgett, DVM, PhD, Diplomate, ABVT, Toxicology, Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine

 

 

 

 

Important phone numbers for a pet poison emergency:
ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center 1-888-426-4435
Pet Poison Helpline 1-800-213-6680
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This article was originally posted on September 13, 2011.

 

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     If you’ve ever considered giving Tylenol or its generic equivalent to a sick or injured pet, take our advice:  Don’t do it.

     Dogs and cats are not little people in fur coats.  Their physiology is significantly different from ours, such that our medicine cabinet staples can be poisonous to them.

     Tylenol (also known as acetaminophen) is deadly to dogs and cats.  Even one tablet is too much for a cat.  Acetaminophen causes severe liver damage, as well as damage to oxygen-carrying red blood cells.

     Signs of Tylenol poisoning include vomiting, breathing difficulty, lethargy, weakness, drooling, and brown-colored gums.  The second stage of poisoning includes swelling of the face, lips and legs; loss of coordination; convulsions and coma.  If a pet survives stage 2, it will go into stage 3 and exhibit jaundice due to liver failure; belly pain and an altered mental state.

     Tylenol poisoning must always be treated as an emergency:  take your pet directly to the 24-hour emergency hospital, such as the Tidewater Animal Emergency and Referral Center (364 South Independence Blvd. in Virginia Beach.)  Pets which recover may need to be on medications and specialized diets to compensate for reduced liver function, for life.

     In short, there is no acceptable case in which to give Tylenol or acetaminophen!

Resource:  http://petplace.com/dogs/acetaminophen-toxicity-in-dogs/page1.aspx

                   http://petplace.com/cats/acetaminophen-toxicity-in-cats/page1.aspx

Helpful Phone Numbers

Tidewater Animal Emergency & Referral Center…………757-499-5463

Pet Poison Helpline ($35 per incident fee)…………………1-800-213-6680  www.petpoisonhelpline.com

ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center ($65 fee)…………1-888-426-4435  www.aspca.org/apcc

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