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Posts Tagged ‘AKC’

Here’s your chance to attend an official Dog Show — for FREE!

I’ve been to Cat Shows and Bird Shows, but I’ve never been to a Dog Show. Have you? — Jen M.

AKC ALL BREED DOG SHOW – HAMPTON HARVEST CIRCUIT

September 15th -18th, 8 AM – 4 PM
Hampton Roads Convention Center

Langley Kennel Club and Virginia Beach Kennel Club will once again co-host their Annual 4-day AKC Sanctioned Dog Show. This year’s show will be held at the Hampton Roads Convention Center located adjacent to the Hampton Coliseum.

Come out and get up-close and personal with the dogs. Go behind the scenes and talk with the groomers, handlers and breeders. In addition to the Conformation Show, the North American Diving Dogs (NADD) will join us to add a splash of excitement.

You’ll enjoy shopping at the huge variety of dog-related vendors and take something home for your own Champion.

The doors open at 8:00 a.m. and admission and parking are FREE. Come experience the exciting world of an AKC Sanctioned All Breed Dog Show and help cheer your favorite breed to the coveted title of “Best in Show”!

Additional link:
Facebook:  Langley Kennel Club

Event details may change at any time, always check with the event organizer when planning to attend this event or purchase tickets.

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Sentinel Spectrum now available by special order
nvsentinelspectrum (250x250)Looking to upgrade your dog’s heartworm preventative?
Ask us about Sentinel Spectrum – the once-a-month chewable that protects against heartworms, whipworms, hookworms, roundworms, and tapeworms, while preventing a flea takeover of your house.

If your dog is a current patient at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic and is up-to-date on its heartworm blood test and preventative medicine*, making the switch is easy: just call us and tell us you’d like to order Sentinel Spectrum.
*Some pets may need a check-up and heartworm blood test before beginning Sentinel Spectrum.

Did You Know?
Labrador Retrievers have been the most popular dog in the U.S. for 24 years, according to the American Kennel Club. The breed originated in Newfoundland, Canada, and has been recognized by the AKC since 1917. 

Events Around Town

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June 5,6,7,12,13,14th: Dirty Rotten Scoundrels: The Musical at the Little Theatre of Norfolk. Get your tickets today for this hilarious romp based on the 1988 movie starring Steve Martin and Michael Caine. Order online at ltnonline.org.

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Click to enlarge.

Saturday, June 13th:  JazzBoy Memorial Dog Parade at Mt. Trashmore in Virginia Beach, to raise funds for TeenAIDS. Space is limited; $20 per dog. Parade begins at noon. Register online teenaids.org.

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Click to enlarge.

Saturday, June 13th: The Catholic Arts Commission presents “Sister’s Summer School Catechism: God Never Takes A Vacation” to raise funds for local charities and Virginia Musical Theater. At Sandler Center in Virginia Beach, a one-night-only special performance. Tickets are $25 at CatholicArtsCommission.com.

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     The Pet Poison Helpline has released a list of the Top Ten toxic substances most frequently reported to its service in 2011 (among dogs only.) Along with that list was a breakdown by breed of the dogs involved.

     The 2011 list of common poisonings was strikingly similar to the one released for 2010, so I’ll share the Top Ten list of breeds involved, instead.

  1. Mixed breeds
  2. Labrador retrievers
  3. Golden retrievers
  4. Chihuahuas
  5. Yorkshire terriers
  6. Dachshunds
  7. Shih Tzus
  8. Boxers
  9. Beagles
  10. German shepherds

     So what’s going on here? Are all these dogs predisposed to having what I call “garbage guts”? Perhaps not. Let’s take a look at the American Kennel Club’s list of the Top Ten breeds registered in 2011:

  1. Labrador retrievers
  2. German shepherds
  3. Beagles
  4. Golden retrievers
  5. Yorkshire terriers
  6. Bulldogs
  7. Boxers
  8. Poodles
  9. Dachshunds
  10. Rottweilers

     (Shih Tzus ranked 11th and Chihuahuas ranked 14th.) 

     Hmmm. I sense a correlation between the prevalence of each particular breed in the population versus its likelihood to end up on a list of calamities like the one above. 

     What do you think? Are these really the most danger-prone dogs, or are the results skewed by each breed’s respective popularity?   

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