Posts Tagged ‘Advantage for fleas’

     Reminder:  Our clinic will be open both Saturday, December 31st and Monday, January 2nd.  We are scheduling appointments both days and will be happy to see you and your pet on either day.

     Also, Saturday this week is absolutely the last day to get a free tube of Advantage when you buy a 4-pack.  Bayer has not extended the special into the New Year, so now is the time to stock up.

     And in case you were wondering – yes!  We are still seeing fleas and tapeworms.  Those nasty little dudes are out in force.  Make sure your pet is protected.

     Enjoying the 60 – 70° days we’ve been having?  The mosquitoes are, too — so don’t forget the heartworm preventative.

     Make sure your pets have a healthy start to
the New Year.

********************************************************************************************
Image courtesy of Vintage Holiday Crafts.

Read Full Post »

     I just read this article from Veterinary Economics February 2011 edition and thought I’d share it with you:

     “Researchers at the University of Cambridge in England revealed the mechanics of a flea’s jump—which can catapult the critter 50 to 100 times its body length. Fleas jump because of an elastic pad made of a protein called resilin. When tensed like a spring, fleas release the pad to catapult themselves into the air. However, researchers wanted to know how fleas achieve liftoff and transfer the force from the spring mechanism to the ground. Cambridge researchers discovered the answer by using high-speed cameras, computer modeling, and 10 donated hedgehog fleas.

      “Using the cameras, researchers filmed the fleas jumping 51 times in a row. During 45 of those jumps, the fleas’ feet and knees were on the ground when the flea pushed off. However, in the remaining six jumps, the knees were both clear of the ground at that time, indicating they didn’t transfer the force of the jump to the ground. In all of the jumps the feet touched the ground, supporting a lower-leg push-off theory.”

     Wow – who knew fleas could be so fascinating?  Too bad they can’t stick around.

Read Full Post »