Heartworm Disease is closer than you think
— so be sure your pet is receiving a monthly heartworm preventative.

Cases of heartworm disease are tracked nationally and reported on by several organizations. One such group, the Companion Animal Parasite Council (CAPC), has discovered that three cities in Virginia are among the Top Ten cities in the U.S. to have experienced an increase in the number of positive heartworm cases in the past 30-45 days.

Alexandria, VA ranked #1 overall, for the highest percentage increase of positive tests in June. If that doesn’t feel close enough for pet owners in Hampton Roads, consider this: Newport News, VA was #3 and Hampton, VA was #4 on the national list!

Here is the complete Top Ten ranking:

1) Alexandria, Va.

2) Corona, Calif.

3) Newport News, Va.

4) Hampton, Va.

5) Paterson, N.J.

6) San Bernardino, Calif.

7) Fargo, N.D.

8) Springfield, Mass.

9) Laredo, Tex.

10) Topeka, Kans.

Heartworms in canine heart

Heartworm Disease is close to home in Hampton Roads, so be sure your pet is receiving a monthly heartworm preventative to protect against this deadly parasite.

Contact Us at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic for an appointment to get your pet protected today.

Link to CAPC report: https://www.petsandparasites.org/about-capc/top-ten-cities-reports/

From the Case Files:

Did you know that dogs and cats can develop an allergy to plastic found in products such as food & water dishes and pet toys? This type of allergic reaction can lead to mild or severe irritation and sores at the lips, chin, jaw, and nose. (Other areas of the body may be affected, as well.) 

A plastic dish may not be right for your pet.

A plastic dish may not be right for your pet.

If your pet’s veterinarian suspects your pet is allergic to plastic, he or she may recommend you swap out all plastic bowls and dishes for stainless steel. You may also be instructed to remove plastic and rubber pet toys. In some cases, the veterinarian will prescribe a topical ointment to use on the affected area.

Inform the veterinarian if the problem persists or if you see signs of infection, such as pus, swelling, inflammation, or bleeding. Other causes of skin disorders include mites, fungus, bacteria, allergens, and even the body’s immune system.

Since there are numerous potential causes for sores and inflammation, check with your pet’s veterinarian to get a professional opinion on your pet’s specific case.

Questions? Contact Us to schedule an appointment for your pet.

If you want to carry your pet’s records while you’re on-the-go, Pawprint has an app that allows you 24/7 access to your pet’s medical information.

When you download the app, Pawprint* contacts your pet’s veterinarian to request records, then uploads them to your account.

Click to enlarge.

Then you’ll be able to set reminders for vaccine boosters, flea and heartworm treatments, even daily walks.

You can add other people to the account, so your go-to pet-sitter can access your pet’s records if you have to go out of town and your pet needs medical care.

You’ll have proof of your pet’s vaccination, as close as your smartphone — which can come in handy at the groomer’s, dog park, or even the veterinary emergency hospital.

If you are a client at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, you can request that we share your pet’s records with Pawprint, or any other pet record app of your choice.

*Other similar apps may be available. 

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Note: Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or staff warranty or guarantee the service provided by Pawprint, nor are the above-named responsible for any costs incurred or damage to your electronic device as a result of downloading the app.
Always use discretion when downloading any app to your electronic device. Some software can cause harm to your device; some software incurs a fee for usage. Always research an app before you download, as you assume liability for any damage or costs incurred.

 

If you love animals and you’re in need of positive vibes from the Internet, we’ve found some places you can visit to feel much, much better!

Photo by rawpixel.com via Pexels

On Twitter: Cute Emergency https://twitter.com/CuteEmergency

On Instagram: The 10 best pet accounts (according to Digital Photography Review): https://www.dpreview.com/post/7960048854/10-pets-insta

On Facebook: Funny Pets https://www.facebook.com/ofunnypets/

By Daddy Dolls: Custom pet pillows, using your photos: https://daddydolls.com/LargePetPillow

Enjoy!

With daily high temperatures in the 80s and 90s,
it’s time for a reminder on how to prevent deadly heat stroke in pets.

Photo by Pixabay via Pexels

For long-time readers of this blog, this post on heat stroke looks familiar. Why? Because I’ve been posting it nearly every year since 2010. Every year, pets suffer heat stroke, but it doesn’t have to be that way. So I’ll keep repeating this column until heat stroke in pets is a thing of the past.

Heat Stroke in Pets

Do you know how to protect your pets from heat stroke during the muggy days of summer? This goes beyond the usual caveat of “never leave your pet in a car while you go shopping, babysit, attend a sporting event, spy on your ex, etc. Here are some tips to keep your pet safe in the yard or out and about:

  • Keep pets indoors as much as possible, especially if they are sluggish or panting soon after going outdoors.
  • Limit exercise to brief walks in the coolest parts of the day. Keep in mind that hot pavement and sand can burn pets’ paws.
  • Provide plenty of cool water. Check water throughout the day, as it can become hot if left outdoors. 
  • Kennels and pens should have good ventilation and air circulation and should be kept in shaded areas.

Warning Signs of Heat Stroke or Heat Stress

Your pet may need emergency assistance if it exhibits any of the following signs:

  • Excessive panting and drooling
  • Bright red gums
  • Balance problems
  • Lethargy
  • Staring or anxious expression
  • Labored breathing
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Failure to respond to commands
  • High fever
  • Collapse

What To Do

Lower your pet’s body temperature by easing him into a cool (not freezing) bath. Water from the outdoor hose may be hot, so that may not be your best option.  

Bring your pet indoors and place him in a tub, taking care to keep his mouth and nose above water [we use stacks of towels to accomplish this.] 

Apply ice packs to his head and neck. 

Call your veterinarian for further instructions. In most cases, your pet will be hospitalized for treatment and observation. By necessity, this sort of care may take place at a veterinary emergency hospital.

Who Is At Risk of Heat Stroke?

Any pet can have heat stroke, but some are more susceptible than others. All pets need to be protected on hot days. However, these pets are more likely than others to have a problem:

  • Very young and older pets
  • Short-nosed/pug-nosed breeds
  • Overweight pets
  • Pets with cardiovascular or respiratory disorders
  • Pets with a previous history of heat stress

Heat stroke is a life-threatening emergency. If you suspect your pet has heat stroke, we recommend taking him to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for comprehensive care.

[Information borrowed from “Summer Pet Tips” by Ralston Purina Company and “Summer Safety Tips” by Firstline magazine.]

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This article was originally published on July 28, 2010.

Nature hikes aren’t just for people — your dog can also enjoy exercising in the great outdoors, beyond your yard, at Norfolk Botanical Garden all summer.*

Stock photo by Liesbeth Koopmans via Pexels

Summer Sunday Dog Days 2019 at Norfolk Botanical Garden

*Sundays in June, July, August, September & October
9 AM – 7 PM

Members and Members’ Dogs are FREE
Not-yet-members’ Dogs: $5 (human admission applies)

Know before you go: Double-check for any changes to the schedule or hours before arriving at the Garden.

Your dog must remain on a leash at all times.
Dogs are not permitted in the Children’s Garden or Butterfly House.

Watch this blog for more dog-friendly events at Norfolk Botanical Garden — located less than 2 miles from Little Creek Veterinary Clinic!

How to Build a Safe and Stylish Catio

Posted on April 14, 2017 under Cat Articles at PetsBest.com 

By Julie Sheer, Houzz.

It’s the dilemma of every cat owner: how to let Kitty enjoy the outdoors without risk of the Great Escape. The outside world can be a dangerous place for a roaming cat, with the threat of predators, cars, poison and diseases. Not to mention the danger to wild birds, which outdoor cats kill in monumental numbers. Catios — or cat patios — are safely enclosed playhouses for felines that provide fresh air, mental stimulation and exercise.

Cats confined indoors are at higher risk for stress-related diseases, says Dr. Martine van Boeijen, a cat veterinarian in Perth, Australia. “An enclosed catio, which safely confines your cat to your property, allows your cat to have the best of both worlds.” Here is a basic guide on custom, kit and DIY options for adding a catio to your home.

Catios can be as elaborate as a custom-designed feline jungle gym or as simple as enclosing a patio with screening. Here, Rasputin enjoys one of the perches in a custom catio built in Arcadia, California.

Suggested Features
It’s important to make sure catios are escape-proof and include basic feline comforts:

  • Entry door or window, or walkway or tunnel from the house
  • Perches, ramps, steps, bridges, catwalks
  • Post or tree for scratching and climbing
  • Hiding places
  • Beds, pillows or hammocks for resting

Finish reading this article at PetsBest.com


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