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Archive for the ‘Pet Health’ Category

3 Weird Pet Problems You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

As a pet owner, you do your best to protect your pet from typical known hazards, such as diseases, traffic, heat stroke, and the like…but there are some weird problems pets can come up with that you’ve probably never heard of. For example:

  1. Tick bite paralysis…While not very common, this very real condition occurs when a female tick releases a toxin into a dog while feeding. Signs of tick bite paralysis show up 6-9 days after a tick has attached itself to a dog. The toxin affects the nerves carrying signals between the spinal cord and muscles. [Cats are less frequently affected by this toxin.]
    It is important to find and remove all ticks on the affected dog — and to bring the pet to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for treatment, especially if the pet is having trouble breathing.
    What are the early warning signs of tick-bite paralysis? Read this article to get the full scoop.
  2. Water intoxication…According to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, water intoxication, though rare, usually occurs during the warmer months when pets spend time at the beach or in a pool.
    Signs of water intoxication include nausea, vomiting, lethargy, difficulty breathing, and a swollen belly. In severe cases, the pet may be weak, unable to walk properly (stumbling), have seizures, have an abnormally slow heart rate, exhibit hypothermia (low body temperature), or even go into a coma.
    Pets that are suspected of having water intoxication should be taken to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for life-saving treatment.

    Which pets are most at risk for water intoxication? Read this article to find out.
  3. Toxic vomit…If your pet eats a rodent poison containing zinc phosphide, the chemical can mix with stomach acids and water to create dangerous phosphine gas. If your pet vomits, the gas is released into the air, which can lead to poisoning in people and pets. Phosphine gas can smell like garlic or rotting fish — or it may be odorless.
    If you suspect your pet has ingested rodent poison, call the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (1-888-426-4435) and take your pet to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for treatment.
    Which poisons contain the ingredient zinc phosphide? Read this article to get the list.

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This article is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or suggest a treatment for any disease or disorder. This article is not a substitute for veterinary care or a client-doctor-patient relationship, nor does it constitute such a relationship. Your pet’s veterinarian is the best source of information regarding your pet’s health.

Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff is responsible for outcomes based on information available on this site.

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Today’s guest post is by Dr. Heather Brookshire, a veterinary ophthalmologist at Animal Vision Center of Virginia.
Tips & Tricks: Applying ointment

Administering pills or eye drops to your pet is one thing, but applying ointment over the surface of their eye? Yes, we know. It sounds impossible, but it can be done when you follow these tried and true instructions. Deep breath. Here we go:
  • Place your pet on a table or counter top, with a towel or blanket on the surface so they feel secure. 
  • Before applying the ointment, use a clean, warm washcloth to remove any mucus or discharge from the eye. 
  • Hold your pet gently, but firmly, in front of you with their back towards you. If your pet is wiggly, you may try wrapping them in a blanket to secure them. 
  • Using your non-dominant hand, gently compress the tube to allow a small amount of ointment to escape the tip (approximately ¼ inch in length). 
  • Using the same hand, manually open the eyelid and drape the released ointment on the surface of the eye, taking care not to make contact with the eye. 
  • Gently close the eyelid to assist with dispersion of the ointment on the surface of the eye. 
And remember – if both drops and ointments are part of your pet’s post-care plan, always apply the drop first, and then wait 5-10 minutes before applying the ointment. 

Reprinted with permission.This article is not intended to diagnose
or treat any medical condition and is not a substitute for
an examination by your pet’s veterinarian.

Your pet’s eyes are delicate organs. If you have a concern about your pet’s eyes, 
Contact Us
 to schedule an appointment with our veterinarian.

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If you plan to travel with your pet this summer (or any other time), you may be making a list of things to pack for your furry traveling companion.

But there may be things you haven’t considered — and knowing about them could make the trip safer and more enjoyable for you and your dog or cat.

Dr. Samantha Nelson, of BluePearl Veterinary Partners, has created a list of 26 tips for traveling with your pet.

Check them out on BluePearl’s client blog:   https://bluepearlvet.com/blog/26-tips-for-traveling-safely-with-your-pets

Bonus Links:

Find pet-friendly hotels, restaurants, and more:   https://www.aaa.com/pettravel

Is your pet up-to-date on vaccines? Learn why he should be, before leaving town: https://littlecreekvet.com/2010/11/15/holiday-travel-series-part-4

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Helping your dog cope with fireworks,
thunderstorms and other loud noises

By Dr. Nora Grant

Chances are there’s a four-legged friend on your block with anxiety or fear of a summertime noise. Maybe, it’s your dog and you don’t even know it.

Recent studies indicate more than 83 percent of dogs show a fearful response to fireworks and 65 percent toward thunderstorms. However, only 13 percent of pet owners recognize their dog suffers from fear.

“Fireworks, thunderstorms and other loud noises can trigger fear, anxiety and stress for our dogs similar to a panic attack. It can be a serious issue as one in five dogs goes missing after being scared by loud noises,” said Dr. Todd McCracken, a veterinary services manager with Ceva Animal Health. “In fact, more dogs run away on the Fourth of July than any other day of the year, which makes July 5 the busiest day of the year for animal shelters across the country.”

The most common signs of fear in dogs include hiding or trying to escape, barking, panting, drooling, pacing, shaking, chewing, digging, scratching and inappropriate elimination.

Pet owners can prepare their dog for a fear-free firework and storm season by following these steps:

  1. Check Dog Tag ID and Secure Fences
    Double check your dog has an updated name tag on a properly fitting collar so you can quickly be reunited with your dog if it escapes. Be sure your fences are fully secure.

[Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, also recommends permanent pet ID, such as the HomeAgain microchip.]

  1. Use a Calming Pheromone
    Pheromones work by releasing “comforting messages” that remind your dog of the safety of being with his/her mom. The ADAPTIL® Calm Home Diffuser and ADAPTIL® Calm On-the-go Collar are clinically proven to help dogs cope with loud noises.

[Did You Know? Natural supplements, such as Solliquin, can also help relieve noise-related anxiety.]

  1. Create a Safe Place
    Your pet should have access to a safe, secure and comfortable place where sounds or flashes can be shut out. This space can include a bed or blanket for your dog to get comfortable in and some familiar toys.

  2. Play Soothing Sounds
    Play some classical music or turn on the TV to mask outside noises.

To learn more about how to reduce summertime pet anxiety and stress, visit www.SummerNoises.com.

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From anxiety issues to urinary tract infections, veterinarians are using natural nutritional supplements — sometimes called “nutraceuticals” — to help support healthy body function in pets and, in some cases, reduce reliance on drugs (pharmaceuticals).

 

At Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, our line-up of nutritional supplements supports dog and cat health in these areas: liver, gastrointestinal tract, joints, urinary tract, skin, and emotional health.

Our favorite nutritional supplements for pets include Cranberry PlusDasuquin, Denamarin (not shown), Free Form Snip Tips, Solliquin, and Vetri Mega Probiotic.

Nutritional supplements often are used alongside traditional medications and other supportive treatment. Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends supplements for his patients: to promote good health, reduce symptoms, and lessen the chance of recurrence of certain medical problems.

Always consult your pet’s veterinarian before starting your pet on a nutritional supplement. Unless directed otherwise, stick to supplements specially formulated for pets (skip the human products).

Nutritional supplements can enhance your pet’s health, but often are not sufficient to treat or cure a particular disease or disorder. Be sure to partner with your pet’s veterinarian to determine if a nutritional supplement can help your dog or cat.

Contact Us to schedule an appointment at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic to discuss your pet’s health today.

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This article is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or suggest a treatment for any disease or disorder. This article is not a substitute for veterinary care or a client-doctor-patient relationship, nor does it constitute such a relationship. Your pet’s veterinarian is the best source of information regarding your pet’s health.

Always check with your pet’s doctor before adding any supplement to your pet’s diet. Examination, tests and a treatment plan may be necessary before beginning nutritional supplements. Not all supplements are appropriate for all pets. Ask your veterinarian. 

Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff is responsible for outcomes based on information available on this site.

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   In our previous post, we reviewed Ten Warning Signs of Cancer in Dogs and Cats, as reported by the Morris Animal Foundation (MAF). MAF is a leader in funding research that improves animals’ lives. Cancer is a chief health concern.

   Eleven million dogs and cats are diagnosed with cancer each year. The number is staggering — but there are things pet owners can do to help prevent cancer in their pets.

   Today, we share Morris Animal Foundation’s list of 12 things you can do to reduce your pet’s risk of developing cancer.

CLICK HERE to download the list for easy reading.

 

CLICK HERE to download the list for easy reading.

 

   To learn more about the Morris Animal Foundation, the good work they do, and how you can be a part of the movement toward better animal health, visit their website:  www.morrisanimalfoundation.org

 

Disclaimer: Information on this site is provided for educational purposes only, and is not meant to diagnose, treat, or cure your pet. Information provided on this site does not take the place of a valid client-patient-doctor relationship, nor does it constitute such a relationship. Your pet’s veterinarian is the best source of information regarding your pet’s health. Your pet may require an examination and testing by a licensed veterinarian in order to provide proper diagnosis and treatment. Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff is responsible for outcomes based on information available on this site. Every pet’s condition is unique and requires the direct care and oversight of its own veterinarian.

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Here’s a startling statistic: 11 million dogs and cats are diagnosed with cancer each year,

according to the Morris Animal Foundation (MAF). Since 1950, the Morris Animal Foundation has funded over 2,600 studies to improve the lives of dogs, cats, horses, and wildlife. In particular, MAF has been supporting cancer research since 1962, in pursuit of a cure and better quality of life for all animals.

Using research from Colorado State University Flint Animal Cancer Center, MAF has produced this list of 10 Warning Signs of Cancer in Dogs and Cats:

Cancer Warning Signs by Morris Animal Foundation. Click to enlarge.

It is important to remember that other diseases or physical ailments can cause symptoms similar to those listed above. Do not attempt to diagnose cancer on your own. Your pet’s veterinarian, or a specialty practice, can perform diagnostic tests to find out whether your pet’s symptoms are a result of cancer or something else.

In our next blog post, we will share an in-depth review of Morris Animal Foundation’s tips on how to help prevent cancer in pets. See below for a “sneak preview.”

Pet Cancer Prevention Checklist by Morris Animal Foundation. Click to enlarge.

Did you know you can donate to the Morris Animal Foundation? Your donation can help fund the next generation of life-saving research. Donate here.

 

Disclaimer: Information on this site is provided for educational purposes only, and is not meant to diagnose, treat, or cure your pet. Information provided on this site does not take the place of a valid client-patient-doctor relationship, nor does it constitute such a relationship. Your pet’s veterinarian is the best source of information regarding your pet’s health. Your pet may require an examination and testing by a licensed veterinarian in order to provide proper diagnosis and treatment. Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff is responsible for outcomes based on information available on this site. Every pet’s condition is unique and requires the direct care and oversight of its own veterinarian.

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