Archive for the ‘General’ Category

Drug take back day October 24th

If you have bottles of expired or unwanted medications — whether they were prescribed for people or for pets — do NOT flush them down the toilet. Flushing drugs may contaminate the water system and the environment. But you need to safely dispose of the medications — so what should you do?

Mark your calendar for Saturday, October 24th, the DEA National Prescription Drug Take Back Day (10 AM to 2 PM.)

“The National Prescription Drug Take Back Day addresses a crucial public safety and public health issue. According to the 2018 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 9.9 million Americans misused controlled prescription drugs — an increase of 3.9 million people since the 2017 survey.

The study shows that a majority of abused prescription drugs were obtained from family and friends, often from the home medicine cabinet.
“The DEA’s Take Back Day events provide an opportunity for Americans to prevent drug addiction and overdose deaths,” according to the Drug Enforcement Administration.

Find a collection site near you by following this link and scrolling to Collection Site Locator: https://takebackday.dea.gov

On Take Back Day, most collection sites will be at designated police stations.

The Take Back Day website also lists alternate collection sites — including many local pharmacies — if you miss the official Take Back Day.

Don’t let expired drugs end up in the wrong hands — take advantage of Take Back Day!

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Does your cat sit and stare at you sometimes? Maybe they are trying to telepathically tell you something of great importance about their health and well-being.

Person high-fiving a grey cat

According to feline health experts, here’s what they may be saying:

  1. The other cat is bullying me and I need my space.

Providing multiple, separate food dishes, feeding areas and litter boxes is one way to reduce aggressive cat-to-cat interactions. Every cat in the household (and you) benefits from separate eating and bathroom areas.

  1. Elevate me.

Cats love high perches so they can easily monitor the space around them. It makes them feel safe and gives them a sense of control over their domain. Build some vertical spaces in your home for your cat. Your cat will thank you!

  1. That lemon-scented plug-in is driving me crazy!

Cats have a keen sense of smell and what we think smells pleasing may be highly irritating to your cat. For example, cats don’t like citrus scents or strong household cleaners, like alcohol or bleach. However, cats do love their own scent and it’s why they rub up against us and the furniture. Do a scent inventory of your house and eliminate smells that may add stress to your cat’s life.

  1. Inside voices, please.

Cats have extraordinary hearing, an adaptation needed as a hunter. They can hear sounds we can’t hear, like the ultrasonic chitchat of mice and rats. So, it’s no wonder that loud sounds can be startling to them.

  1. I want a catio!

If possible, cats should have access to safe, outdoor spaces. Enclosed patios for cats keep them safe from predators, while giving them fresh air and a safe place for bird watching! If a catio is not in your cat’s future, provide them with a room with a view or, if you are adventurous and patient, try leash training them for a safe, outdoor field trip.

  1. Did you know I’m still a predator?

Cat brains are wired to hunt. To keep them from getting bored, provide them with toys that can be pounced on and thrown up in the air to simulate the chase. Also, find ways to play hide and seek with their food, including placing dry food in store-bought feeding balls that mimics hunting. An active cat is a happy cat.

  1. I need a time-out place.

Cats love to hide, especially when they feel threatened. It also gives them a safe and peaceful place to rest outside the hustle and bustle of their human housemates. Give them plenty of hiding options, including boxes, covered carriers or a favorite closet with lots of blankets.

  1. I’ll choose when I want to interact with you.

Always let a cat come to you and signal it wants attention. These signals can be as obvious as jumping in your lap, purring or rubbing up against you. Some cats also are just happy sitting next to you. Cats, just like people, need varying degrees of attention and they’ll let you know how much attention they need to be happy.

  1. I’ve got to scratch.

Most people think cats need to scratch to sharpen their claws. What they are really doing, beside some manicure maintenance, is marking their territory with scent glands in their paws. Provide your cat with scratching posts in areas where they can stretch out and scent away. Cats have different preferences for scratching surfaces so you may need to experiment to find the right fit.

  1. Don’t scold me if I have an accident.

Peeing and pooping outside the box can be a simple matter of the litter box being dirty or using a scented litter your cat didn’t like. But bathroom indiscretions also can indicate a health problem such as kidney disease, diabetes and even arthritis. If accidents become more frequent, it’s time for a cat checkup to make sure there is not an underlying health issue going on.

Providing a comfortable space for your cat, with the resources they need, can dramatically reduce your pet’s anxiety. A more relaxed cat translates into a healthier and well-behaved cat. So, listen to your cat whenever possible. They really are trying to tell you something.

Find out how the Morris Animal Foundation is working every day to improve the lives of dogs, cats, horses, and wildlife around the world.
Click here!


REFERENCES:

Funding a Pressing Need for Feline Behavior Research, Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, April 2020

AAFP and ISFM Feline Environmental Needs Guidelines, Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, February 2013


Photo credit: Snapwire via Pexels

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Did You Know? Your favorite over-the-counter pet products are available through curbside service at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Call 757-583-2619 [or email littlecreekvet@live.com] to place an order — leave a message, if necessary.

We will return your message* to let you know when the item will be ready.

Drive up to our building and we will bring the order out to you and take payment.

*Please note that our current business hours are Monday–Friday 1:30 – 5:00 PM. However, we may be closed on certain days, in order to attend personal appointments. We will strive to return your message as soon as possible within a day.

See the list below this image, for available otc items. Offer is for in-stock items only.

Curbside service available for otc refills

Products available without examination include:

  • Combiva II flea control for small dogs
  • Dasuquin joint supplement tablets
  • Dermal Soothe spray
  • Fly Repellent ointment
  • HomeoPet Anxiety Relief drops
  • HyLyt shampoo
  • Oxyfresh Water Additive
  • PetzLife Oral Care gel
  • Pill crusher
  • Seresto canine flea & tick collars
  • VetriMega Probiotic
  • VetzLife Oral gel

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Is your pet’s microchip information up-to-date? It’s time to find out!

1 in 3 family pets will get lost…

microchipped pets are more likely to be returned to their homes…

however…

it is estimated that only 6 out of every 10 pet microchip IDs are registered in a searchable database — and some that are registered may contain outdated owner contact information.

A microchip ID is a valuable tool for reuniting lost pets with their families — but only if the chip is registered with current contact information.

You can check your pet’s microchip ID registry status in two ways:

  1. If you know your pet’s microchip ID number, visit www.petmicrochiplookup.org and enter the ID number. If registered, you can then contact the appropriate database [the contact info will be provided] to update your phone number and address.
  2. If you do not know your pet’s microchip ID number, bring your pet to a veterinarian, such as Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, for a free microchip scan. [Most chips can be read by our universal scanner.] Once the microchip ID number has been discovered, you can enter it into www.petmicrochiplookup.org and follow the instructions.

If your pet is not registered in any database, Pet Microchip Lookup will tell you the chip’s manufacturer and contact information so that you can register your pet’s microchip ID right away.

Contact Us to find out how we can scan your pet for a microchip.

Microchip ID statistics


This post originally appeared on August 15, 2019.

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June is American Humane’s Adopt-a-Cat Month, and they’ve put together a tip sheet to help you bring home a new fur-ever friend (or two!)

Mid-coated brown cat

Cat Adoption Checklist

Thinking of adopting a cat? First, check out these helpful tips, gathered by American Humane.

  • If you’re thinking about adopting a cat, consider taking home two. Cats require exercise, mental stimulation, and social interaction. Two cats can provide this for each other. Plus they’ll provide more benefits to you. Cats’ purring has been shown to soothe humans as well as themselves – and they have an uncanny ability to just make you smile. A great place to start your search is online. Sites like petfinder.com let you search numerous shelters in your area simultaneously to help narrow your search and more quickly find the match that’s right for you and your new feline friend.
  • Find a cat whose personality meshes with yours. Just as we each have our own personality, so do cats. In general, cats with long hair and round heads and bodies are more easygoing than lean cats with narrow heads and short hair, who are typically more active. Adoption counselors can offer advice to help you match the cat’s personality with your own.
  • Pick out a veterinarian ahead of time and schedule a visit within the first few days following the adoption. You’ll want to take any medical records you received from the adoption center on your first visit. Kittens in particular should accompany you to make the appointment – even before the exam itself – so staff can pet the cat and tell you that you’ve chosen the most beautiful one ever.
  • Make sure everyone in the house is prepared to have a cat before it comes home. Visiting the shelter or animal control facility should be a family affair. When adopting a new cat with existing pets at home, discuss with the adoption facility how to make a proper introduction.
  • Budget for the short- and long-term costs of a cat. Understand any pet is a responsibility and there’s a cost associated with that. A cat adopted from a shelter is a bargain; many facilities will have already provided spaying or neutering, initial vaccines, and a microchip for permanent identification.
    [Links added to this post by LCVC]

Click for the final 5 steps to success!


Photo credit: Alena Koval via Pexels.com

Author credit: American Humane

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April’s Animal Health Awareness Events

Much of the world is in limbo right now,
but Nature continues her work!

Check out what’s in store for April:

  • ASCPA’s Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Month
  • American Red Cross’s Pet First Aid Awareness Month
  • Prevention of Lyme Disease in Dogs Month [link]
  • National Frog Month [sounds ribbetting –get it?]
  • National Heartworm Awareness Month [link]
  • April 11 — National Pet Day
  • April 12-18 — National Dog Bite Prevention Week [link]
  • April 12-18 — National Animal Control Officer Appreciation Week
  • April 14 — National Dolphin Day
  • April 16 — Biomedical Research Awareness Day  [link]
  • April 17 — National Bat Appreciation Day [link, link]
  • April 17-23 — National Pet ID Week [link]
  • April 22 — Earth Day [link]
  • April 24 — Hairball Awareness Day
  • April 25 — World Penguin Day
  • April 25 — World Veterinary Day
  • April 26 — National Kids and Pets Day
  • April 29 — National Guide Dog Day
  • April 30 — National Adopt a Shelter Pet Day

 

 

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Animated snowflakes

I saw a little snow.

Very little.

And now we’re back to work.

Enjoy the day!

 

 

 


Falling snow gif by Webweaver

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Good news!

Our phones and other machines are working again, so the robot rebellion is on hold for a bit.

Now the only question is: Will the snow impact our schedule?

Stay tuned!

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We are sorry to report that our phone service has been spotty since last week, since a tech visit by our phone service provider to clear static from the lines. However, we did not appreciate the full extent of the problem until today.

At this time, our answering machine cannot connect to the phone system and record your messages. Our fax machine is unable to receive faxes. And it appears that one of our phones is not working. 

The good bit of news is that the front desk phone is working and we have discovered a work-around in order to run the credit card machine. Please do not notify our phone service provider, though; we’re afraid they’ll come back out and “fix” those, too!

If you have been trying to reach us and were unsuccessful, we share in your frustration. We hope to have a resolution this week.

In the meantime, please Contact Us with your non-emergency issues and questions.

In an emergency, call 757-499-5463.


UPDATE: Robocalls have no problem getting through, as usual. *eyeroll*

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