Archive for the ‘General’ Category

If your dog or cat has an emergency,
will you know what to do before you
take your pet to the veterinary hospital?

 

You can learn CPR and First Aid for cats and dogs at a class held November 24th in Williamsburg, VA (details and link below).

WHAT: Pet Emergency Education presents Canine and Feline CPR and First Aid Certification Class

WHEN: Sunday, November 24, 2019 from 1:30 – 4:30 PM

WHERE: James City County Library, 7770 Croaker Rd., Cosby Room, Williamsburg

COST: $69.95 up to $138.95, depending on level of registration

“Pre-registration required and ends 7 days prior to the class”

REGISTER HERE and learn details of the subjects covered in class

Note from Pet Emergency Education: “Although emergency first aid can improve the outcome of an animal that is experiencing a medical emergency, our company and our instructors will recommend that owners/caregivers seek veterinary care in all instances.”

Disclaimer: This post is provided for informational purposes. Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff are associated with this event and, as such, do not offer any guarantee or warranty on this class, its contents, or any outcomes as a result of attending this class.

Always check the event status for cancellations or rescheduling. 

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There are so many things going on in September that we can’t fit them all on our Facebook header.

Here’s the list, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association:

September is…

*Catalyst Council’s Happy Cat Month
*Animal Pain Awareness Month ​

*National Disaster Preparedness Month
*Pet Sitter Education Month
*National Food Safety Education Month
*National Service Dog Month
*Responsible Dog Ownership Month

National Iguana Awareness Day
September 8

National Pet Memorial Day
September 8
Second Sunday in September

National Teach Ag Day
September 19

National Elephant Appreciation Day
September 22

National Deaf Dog Awareness Week
September 22-28
Last full week of September starting with a Sunday

Sea Otter Awareness Week
September 22-28
Last full week of September starting with a Sunday

National Farm Safety & Health Week
TBA

World Rabies Day
September 28​

Which event is most important to you?

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August 15th is National Check the Chip Day — and for good reason:

1 in 3 family pets will get lost…

microchipped pets are more likely to be returned to their homes…

however…

it is estimated that only 6 out of every 10 pet microchip IDs are registered in a searchable database — and some that are registered may contain outdated owner contact information.

A microchip ID is a valuable tool for reuniting lost pets with their families — but only if the chip is registered with current contact information.

You can check your pet’s microchip ID registry status in two ways:

  1. If you know your pet’s microchip ID number, visit www.petmicrochiplookup.org and enter the ID number. If registered, you can then contact the appropriate database [the contact info will be provided] to update your phone number and address.
  2. If you do not know your pet’s microchip ID number, bring your pet to a veterinarian, such as Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, for a free microchip scan. [Most chips can be read by our universal scanner.] Once the microchip ID number has been discovered, you can enter it into www.petmicrochiplookup.org and follow the instructions.

If your pet is not registered in any database, Pet Microchip Lookup will tell you the chip’s manufacturer and contact information so that you can register your pet’s microchip ID right away.

If your pet does not have a microchip ID — a permanent form of identification — Contact Us to schedule an appointment to ‘chip your pet.

Microchip ID statistics

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If You Care, Leave It There — Wild Baby Animals May Not Need Your Help

Morris Animal Foundation
April 18, 2019

With spring busting out around us, animals of all shapes and sizes are preparing for the arrival of little ones. Nests are built, dens dug and burrows lined with soft material in preparation. However, parenting is a bit different in the wild and you’ll want to know what that means when you come upon a seemingly lost baby animal.

It’s not unusual for a raccoon mom to leave her babies sleeping up in a tree for the day or a doe to leave her young alone and hidden for long stretches of time. These babies are not abandoned. It’s just the parenting style adapted by these species to keep their young safe. 

Intervening when help is not needed is harmful to wildlife, especially young ones. There’s a saying in the wildlife rehabilitation world – if you care, leave it there. One way to help recognize a true wild animal emergency is to learn about the species that live in your backyard and in the wilderness spaces near you. Also, know who to contact in those rare instances that human intervention is necessary. A little knowledge goes a long way in helping you decide what to do – and what not to do – when you come across a baby animal in the wild.

Tips to Help Keep Wild Babies Safe

1. Know Wildlife Parenting Styles
Mother rabbits only feed their kits once or twice a day, usually around dawn and dusk. A doe only visits and nurses their fawn a few times a day to avoid attracting predators. It’s normal to find fully feathered songbird babies on the ground and parents caring for them for several days until these young birds master flying.

2. Assess the Situation
If wildlife babies have good body condition, seem well fed and growing, leave them alone. These animals are not abandoned. In contrast, if you see an animal with poor body condition, visible wounds, bleeding, vomiting, shaking, these animals need help. Consult your veterinarian or contact a wildlife rehabilitation facility near you if you think an animal is in crisis.

3. Rescue or Call in the Professionals?
Rehabilitators can provide you with instructions on how to rescue and transport different species of baby animals. Always wear gloves or other protective clothing when handling any wild animal to minimize your risk of being bitten or scratched.

What about animals higher up on the food chain, like eagles or even young mountain lions? Leave them alone and call in the professionals. Many rehabilitators have a network of volunteers specially trained to rescue and transport these animals.

Never try to rescue an animal that is disoriented, having trouble breathing, acting aggressively or is covered with visible parasites, and make sure your children and pets stay away, too. Call your local animal control agency, whose professionals can safely capture, test and sound the alert if an animal is infected with a transmissible disease such as rabies, distemper, mange and even plague.

4. Re-nesting is OK
If you find an uninjured bird that is a hatchling (featherless, eyes closed) or nestling (starting to develop feathers, eyes open), they often can be re-nested. You can either replace the original nest if it’s been blown down or make an artificial nest and secure it to a tree near where you found the baby bird. Then watch and see if the parents return to care for their young.

If you find an uninjured baby squirrel with its eyes still closed, place the animal in a container near the base of the tree where you found it. Once the baby calls out, the parent will locate it and re-nest the baby for you. In either case, if no bird or squirrel parent returns within several hours of your re-nesting attempt, these animals may need professional help and care to survive.

5. Know Who to Call
See if your veterinarian is part of a rehabilitation network that can treat wildlife or exotics. If not, many clinics, especially emergency clinics, have lists of local rehabilitation facilities and the types of animals they assist. You also can contact your local humane society, the Audubon Society, wild bird stores, your local animal control officer, or an aquarium or marine patrol (for marine reptiles and mammals).

6. If You are Unable to Reach a Professional Immediately
If you can easily handle the wild animal, place the baby in a box with airholes, lined with something soft, like a T-shirt or towel. Keep the animal in a warm, dark, quiet place. Darkness makes the animal feel more secure. To minimize stress, leave the animal alone.

Although this sounds counterintuitive, do not provide food or water, unless instructed by a professional to do so. Different animals have species-specific nutritional needs. Also, providing even a small amount of water runs the risk of the animal getting wet, chilled and even drowning if the animal is small and vulnerable. What seems like an act of kindness may actually do more harm than good.

7. It’s Illegal to Care for Injured Wildlife
In many areas, it is illegal to keep and care for wildlife without a proper license and training. You risk the possibility of being fined so know the laws in your state or region. They are there to protect both you and the animal.

A wildlife baby’s natural parents always are the best option to raise that animal and give it the best chance of survival. Knowing when not to intervene is equally as important as knowing when to rush in and help. Veterinary or rehabilitation professionals are your best resource for saving a life, sometimes by just letting you know to when to leave the animal alone.

Learn more about how Morris Animal Foundation is saving wildlife through our health studies.
Our work is helping researchers develop life-saving diagnostics, treatments and strategies for rehabilitation and rescue organizations, so they can save even more lives. From sea turtles to raptors to marsupials, wherever an animal lives, we are here to help. And we couldn’t do it without the generous support of our animal-loving donors.

This article originally appeared on Morris Animal Foundation’s website here.

More from Morris:

https://littlecreekvet.com/2018/05/17/know-the-warning-signs-of-cancer-in-cats-and-dogs/

https://littlecreekvet.com/2018/05/22/heres-what-you-need-to-know-about-preventing-cancer-in-your-pets/

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If your dog or cat is 4 months or older, it should have a current Rabies vaccination, which will be issued along with a Rabies tag. When placed on your pet’s collar, the tag provides valuable information to help people return your pet if he or she runs away.

Tags
But did you know there is another tag your pet should be wearing?
It’s the city pet license tag. 

All dogs are required to be licensed by the city in which they live.  Most local cities, such as Chesapeake, Hampton, Newport News, Norfolk and Virginia Beach, issue cat licenses, as well.  Pet licenses must be renewed each year and are granted to pets that have a current Rabies vaccination.

There is a small cost involved, and pet owners typically receive a discount on licensing fees for each spayed or neutered pet.  Senior citizens may receive an additional discount on fees for spayed or neutered pets.

     Click on your city’s name for information on license fees, due dates, and issuing agencies.

The Commonwealth of Virginia requires all dogs and cats over four months old to be vaccinated against Rabies. 

Virginia has also instituted a law requiring veterinarians to forward Rabies vaccination information to local city treasurers.  The treasurer compares information received from the veterinarians with its roster of licensed animals.  If an owner has not purchased a license, the treasurer will mail a notice to the owner requesting compliance.

Veterinarians are not required to report unlicensed animals to city agencies.  Our concern is the public health aspect of ensuring that pets and their owners are protected against Rabies, since Rabies is present in Hampton Roads.  Pet owners are responsible for complying with pet license rules in their city of residence.

A final note: a microchip ID is not a substitute for a Rabies or city license tag, nor are the tags a substitute for a microchip ID. Each form of identification has its own merits. To protect your pet with permanent identification that will not wear off, get lost, or be removed by a stranger, ask us for the HomeAgain microchip on your pet’s next visit.

******************************************************************
This article originally appeared January 22, 2015.

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May 2019 check-up and vaccine reminders have been sent out.

If your pet is due for boosters or other services
at this time of year, check your Inbox, Spam folder,
or snail-mailbox for a notice from us.

Or Contact Us at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic,
to find out when your pet is due next for services.

 

Special delivery!

 

Images from The Graphics Fairy.

 

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If you have bottles of expired or unwanted medications — whether they are human or pet medications — do NOT flush them down the toilet. Flushing drugs may contaminate the water system and the environment. But you need to safely dispose of the medications — so what should you do?

Mark your calendar for Saturday, April 27th, the DEA National Prescription Drug Take Back Day (10 AM to 2 PM.)

“The National Prescription Drug Take Back Day addresses a crucial public safety and public health issue. According to the 2017 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 6 million Americans misused controlled prescription drugs. The study shows that a majority of abused prescription drugs were obtained from family and friends, often from the home medicine cabinet.
“The DEA’s Take Back Day events provide an opportunity for Americans to prevent drug addiction and overdose deaths,” according to the Drug Enforcement Administration.

Find a collection site near you by following this link and scrolling to Collection Site Locator: https://takebackday.dea.gov

On Take Back Day, most collection sites will be at designated police stations.

The Take Back Day website also lists alternate collection sites, should you miss the official Take Back Day.

Don’t let expired drugs end up in the wrong hands — take advantage of Take Back Day!

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