Archive for the ‘Beyond’ Category

Every once in a while, I step outside the world of cats and dogs at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, to find other creatures worthy of admiration.

Dragonfly

Dragonfly photo by Jen Miele

This week, I visited the garden of a local hospital, and this dragonfly came by to keep me company. He sat patiently for an extended photo shoot, including this close-up. I suspect he enjoyed the attention!

What will you see, on closer inspection of your surroundings?

-Jen M.

Previous Picture Day posts:

https://littlecreekvet.com/2017/05/16/picture-day-fauna-at-local-parks-and-gardens/

https://littlecreekvet.com/2014/12/09/picture-day-christmas-in-colonial-williamsburg/

 

https://littlecreekvet.com/2014/07/15/picture-day-pops-of-color/

https://littlecreekvet.com/2014/05/06/evening-in-the-garden/

https://littlecreekvet.com/2013/04/25/picture-day-a-walk-in-the-parks/

https://littlecreekvet.com/2010/08/03/picture-day-part-2/

 

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If You Care, Leave It There — Wild Baby Animals May Not Need Your Help

Morris Animal Foundation
April 18, 2019

With spring busting out around us, animals of all shapes and sizes are preparing for the arrival of little ones. Nests are built, dens dug and burrows lined with soft material in preparation. However, parenting is a bit different in the wild and you’ll want to know what that means when you come upon a seemingly lost baby animal.

It’s not unusual for a raccoon mom to leave her babies sleeping up in a tree for the day or a doe to leave her young alone and hidden for long stretches of time. These babies are not abandoned. It’s just the parenting style adapted by these species to keep their young safe. 

Intervening when help is not needed is harmful to wildlife, especially young ones. There’s a saying in the wildlife rehabilitation world – if you care, leave it there. One way to help recognize a true wild animal emergency is to learn about the species that live in your backyard and in the wilderness spaces near you. Also, know who to contact in those rare instances that human intervention is necessary. A little knowledge goes a long way in helping you decide what to do – and what not to do – when you come across a baby animal in the wild.

Tips to Help Keep Wild Babies Safe

1. Know Wildlife Parenting Styles
Mother rabbits only feed their kits once or twice a day, usually around dawn and dusk. A doe only visits and nurses their fawn a few times a day to avoid attracting predators. It’s normal to find fully feathered songbird babies on the ground and parents caring for them for several days until these young birds master flying.

2. Assess the Situation
If wildlife babies have good body condition, seem well fed and growing, leave them alone. These animals are not abandoned. In contrast, if you see an animal with poor body condition, visible wounds, bleeding, vomiting, shaking, these animals need help. Consult your veterinarian or contact a wildlife rehabilitation facility near you if you think an animal is in crisis.

3. Rescue or Call in the Professionals?
Rehabilitators can provide you with instructions on how to rescue and transport different species of baby animals. Always wear gloves or other protective clothing when handling any wild animal to minimize your risk of being bitten or scratched.

What about animals higher up on the food chain, like eagles or even young mountain lions? Leave them alone and call in the professionals. Many rehabilitators have a network of volunteers specially trained to rescue and transport these animals.

Never try to rescue an animal that is disoriented, having trouble breathing, acting aggressively or is covered with visible parasites, and make sure your children and pets stay away, too. Call your local animal control agency, whose professionals can safely capture, test and sound the alert if an animal is infected with a transmissible disease such as rabies, distemper, mange and even plague.

4. Re-nesting is OK
If you find an uninjured bird that is a hatchling (featherless, eyes closed) or nestling (starting to develop feathers, eyes open), they often can be re-nested. You can either replace the original nest if it’s been blown down or make an artificial nest and secure it to a tree near where you found the baby bird. Then watch and see if the parents return to care for their young.

If you find an uninjured baby squirrel with its eyes still closed, place the animal in a container near the base of the tree where you found it. Once the baby calls out, the parent will locate it and re-nest the baby for you. In either case, if no bird or squirrel parent returns within several hours of your re-nesting attempt, these animals may need professional help and care to survive.

5. Know Who to Call
See if your veterinarian is part of a rehabilitation network that can treat wildlife or exotics. If not, many clinics, especially emergency clinics, have lists of local rehabilitation facilities and the types of animals they assist. You also can contact your local humane society, the Audubon Society, wild bird stores, your local animal control officer, or an aquarium or marine patrol (for marine reptiles and mammals).

6. If You are Unable to Reach a Professional Immediately
If you can easily handle the wild animal, place the baby in a box with airholes, lined with something soft, like a T-shirt or towel. Keep the animal in a warm, dark, quiet place. Darkness makes the animal feel more secure. To minimize stress, leave the animal alone.

Although this sounds counterintuitive, do not provide food or water, unless instructed by a professional to do so. Different animals have species-specific nutritional needs. Also, providing even a small amount of water runs the risk of the animal getting wet, chilled and even drowning if the animal is small and vulnerable. What seems like an act of kindness may actually do more harm than good.

7. It’s Illegal to Care for Injured Wildlife
In many areas, it is illegal to keep and care for wildlife without a proper license and training. You risk the possibility of being fined so know the laws in your state or region. They are there to protect both you and the animal.

A wildlife baby’s natural parents always are the best option to raise that animal and give it the best chance of survival. Knowing when not to intervene is equally as important as knowing when to rush in and help. Veterinary or rehabilitation professionals are your best resource for saving a life, sometimes by just letting you know to when to leave the animal alone.

Learn more about how Morris Animal Foundation is saving wildlife through our health studies.
Our work is helping researchers develop life-saving diagnostics, treatments and strategies for rehabilitation and rescue organizations, so they can save even more lives. From sea turtles to raptors to marsupials, wherever an animal lives, we are here to help. And we couldn’t do it without the generous support of our animal-loving donors.

This article originally appeared on Morris Animal Foundation’s website here.

More from Morris:

https://littlecreekvet.com/2018/05/17/know-the-warning-signs-of-cancer-in-cats-and-dogs/

https://littlecreekvet.com/2018/05/22/heres-what-you-need-to-know-about-preventing-cancer-in-your-pets/

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If you have bottles of expired or unwanted medications — whether they are human or pet medications — do NOT flush them down the toilet. Flushing drugs may contaminate the water system and the environment. But you need to safely dispose of the medications — so what should you do?

Mark your calendar for Saturday, April 27th, the DEA National Prescription Drug Take Back Day (10 AM to 2 PM.)

“The National Prescription Drug Take Back Day addresses a crucial public safety and public health issue. According to the 2017 National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 6 million Americans misused controlled prescription drugs. The study shows that a majority of abused prescription drugs were obtained from family and friends, often from the home medicine cabinet.
“The DEA’s Take Back Day events provide an opportunity for Americans to prevent drug addiction and overdose deaths,” according to the Drug Enforcement Administration.

Find a collection site near you by following this link and scrolling to Collection Site Locator: https://takebackday.dea.gov

On Take Back Day, most collection sites will be at designated police stations.

The Take Back Day website also lists alternate collection sites, should you miss the official Take Back Day.

Don’t let expired drugs end up in the wrong hands — take advantage of Take Back Day!

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Today, we conclude our journey through Animals in Ancient Art [Part 1 here; Part 2 here], featuring works on view at the Chrysler Museum in Norfolk, VA. The Chrysler Museum is free to the public, so you can enjoy a day strolling amongst the exhibits.

These works of art, used for everyday purposes or ritualistic activities, come from the Roman Empire, Greece, and Egypt. As shown here, animals have long inspired the imaginations of artists and artisans. The oldest object featured in this gallery is an Egyptian tomb lintel with hieroglyphs, dated to 2375-2287 B.C.E. [Before Common Era] — which means it is over 4,300 years old!

[Related: How Do Scientists Date Ancient Things?]

Note: Photos of 4 Egyptian figurines are from Chrysler.org website; my photos of those objects did not turn out well.

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Today we continue our journey through Animals in Ancient Art, featuring works on view at the Chrysler Museum in Norfolk, Virginia. The Chrysler Museum is free to the public, so you can see how impressive these works are, up-close.

As shown here, animals have inspired objects created for daily use and ritual use for many centuries. The bond between humans and animals is not a modern creation; animals have been revered for their strength, wisdom, and as symbols of good fortune throughout history.

Learn more about the symbolism of animals in ancient Chinese art. 

The artworks in this gallery were collected in Persia, China, and Japan. The oldest object in the selection presented here is a Chinese wine jug featuring birds and fish; it is dated to approximately 500 B.C.E. [Before Common Era].

This is only a sampling of the items you’ll find in the museum’s collection. Enjoy!

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Recently, we blogged about Animals In Art, featuring contemporary artworks spotlighting our beloved pets. At Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, we know that animals have been revered throughout human history as a source of fascination and inspiration.

Today, we begin a walk through Animals in Ancient Art, featuring works on view at the Chrysler Museum. The Chrysler Museum is free to the public, so grab a friend or loved one and see these amazing works [some estimated at over a thousand years old!] for yourself.

Today’s journey through Animals in Ancient Art begins in the Americas (Mesoamerica). Many of these sculptures are estimated to have been created in the years 100-900 C.E. [Common Era, aka A.D.], and one may have originated in 100 B.C.E. [Before Common Era]. The “cat cloth” is estimated to have been created in the years 1100 – 1460 C.E. For complete details on the age and origin of each piece, visit the Chrysler Museum. 

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Pet Blessings taking place at area churches in October 2018

Each year in October, Christian churches in Norfolk and beyond celebrate the Feast of St. Francis of Assisi by blessing your pets. Don’t miss out: choose a church, click the link, and get the details!

October 4

*St. Gregory the Great Catholic Church(VB) http://discovermass.com/church/st-gregory-the-great-virginia-beach-va/
Blessing of the Animals will take place on Thursday, October 4 at 5pm in the Pavilion at St. Gregory’s.

October 6

*Christ the King Catholic Church (N) http://christthekingnorfolk.org/calendar
Pet Blessing at 9 AM

*Church of the Holy Family (VB) https://www.holyfamilyvb.org/bulletins/20180930.pdf
On Saturday, October 6, there will be the Blessing of the Animals Service at 11:00 a.m. and a tour of our Church gardens.

*Hidenwood Presbyterian (NN) https://hidenwood.org/
Pet Blessing at 10 AM, outside

*St. Mary Catholic Church (Ch) http://www.clusterparishes.com/
Pet Blessing Service at 9:30 AM

October 7

*St. Andrews Episcopal Church  (NN) http://www.standrews-episcopal.org/upcoming_events
Pet Blessing at 1 p.m. at the River Road entrance to the church
Invite your friends and neighbors and bring any of God’s creatures, large or small.

*Wycliffe Presbyterian (VB) http://wycliffepresbyterian.org/e-news.php
Bring your pets to this special afternoon service at 4 pm on October 7. Please invite your friends and neighbors – spread the news! Donations of animal toys, food or other pet-friendly items are welcome and will be taken to an animal shelter.
(It is recommended that all animals be on a leash or in a secure carrier.)
Contact Bess Mann (496-2833) for more information. (Rain date: October 14)

*Emmanuel Episcopal Church (VB) http://beta.emmanuelvb.com/news-and-events/?month=2018-10
Pet Blessing 3 PM, Side Yard

*Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd (N) http://goodshepherdnorfolk.org/CurrentAnnouncements
Pet Blessing 10:15 AM in the church


October 14

*Episcopal Church of the Ascension (N) https://ascension-norfolk.org/
Blessing of animals and Holy Eucharist Rite II
When: Sunday, October 14, 2018 @11:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Where: Outside

Bonus: Click here for a classic post with prayers for pets!

We have attempted to accurately reflect each church’s information for the event, but be sure to check with your preferred church for accuracy and any last-minute schedule changes, especially in the event of inclement weather.

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