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Archive for August, 2018

Here’s your chance to attend an official Dog Show — for FREE!

I’ve been to Cat Shows and Bird Shows, but I’ve never been to a Dog Show. Have you? — Jen M.

AKC ALL BREED DOG SHOW – HAMPTON HARVEST CIRCUIT

September 15th -18th, 8 AM – 4 PM
Hampton Roads Convention Center

Langley Kennel Club and Virginia Beach Kennel Club will once again co-host their Annual 4-day AKC Sanctioned Dog Show. This year’s show will be held at the Hampton Roads Convention Center located adjacent to the Hampton Coliseum.

Come out and get up-close and personal with the dogs. Go behind the scenes and talk with the groomers, handlers and breeders. In addition to the Conformation Show, the North American Diving Dogs (NADD) will join us to add a splash of excitement.

You’ll enjoy shopping at the huge variety of dog-related vendors and take something home for your own Champion.

The doors open at 8:00 a.m. and admission and parking are FREE. Come experience the exciting world of an AKC Sanctioned All Breed Dog Show and help cheer your favorite breed to the coveted title of “Best in Show”!

Additional link:
Facebook:  Langley Kennel Club

Event details may change at any time, always check with the event organizer when planning to attend this event or purchase tickets.

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Order food for Labor Day

Little Creek Veterinary Clinic will be closed for the
Labor Day holiday weekend from Saturday, September 1st
through Monday, September 3rd.

Pet emergencies over the holiday weekend
can be handled by BluePearl Town Center (757-499-5463).

Our clinic will re-open on Tuesday, September 4th.

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Reminder: You have more options for flea, tick, and heartworm control + convenient home delivery!

At Little Creek Veterinary Clinic, our flea, tick, and heartworm control options don’t stop at our stockroom doors! 

Choice       Accuracy        Convenience

You have the option of choosing a non-stock product [i.e., one that we do not carry in-clinic] from a trusted source: our vendor-based pharmacy. We will place the order for you, ensuring accuracy in the order. And for your convenience, the products are shipped directly to your door.

Authentic Product       Guaranteed Performance

Some online pharmacies import counterfeit products from overseas or other sources, because they are not authorized by U.S. manufacturers to sell authentic flea, tick, and heartworm control. And some product guarantees are voided when flea, tick, or heartworm control products are purchased through a non-veterinary source.

When you order non-stock products such as Advantage Multi, Bravecto, Revolution for dogs, Sentinel Spectrum, Seresto for cats, Trifexis, or others, through our vendor-based pharmacy, you can be assured you are getting the authentic product along with available manufacturer’s product guarantee.

Contact Us to let us know the name of the product you’d like to order. Remember: some products are by prescription only, and require a doctor’s exam (and possibly a blood test) before ordering.

Bonus Link: Thinking of ordering cheap pet products from your favorite online mega-store? You may want to think twice. Here’s why.

 

 

 

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End your summer vacation with a bang — or a growl, hoot, or roar — with these fun things to do at the Virginia Zoo:

Thursday, August 23rd: Cocktails & Conservation
Take your networking to the next level. Specifically, with cheetahs!Join the Virginia Zoo at Cocktails & Conservation for a night of education, drinks and socializing with the area’s top professionals. The special attraction of the night will be three 3-month old cheetah ambassadors making an appearance after a fascinating presentation from Mary Wykstra, Director of Action for Cheetahs in Kenya, about the species in the wild and measures taken to protect their future.
GET TICKETS HERE

Saturday, August 25th: Bowling For Rhinos (at Pinboys in VB)
Come help us strike out extinction at Tidewater AAZK’s Bowling for Rhinos! It will be a fun evening including bowling, a silent auction, door prizes and more! Bring your family and friends to this all ages event and contribute to international rhino conservation!
GET TICKETS HERE

Friday, August 31st: Zoovies Feat. “Zootopia”
Join the Zoo for a night the whole family will roar about! Bring the kiddos or your friends to Zoovies, an outdoor movie night at the Virginia Zoo. This month we feature Zootopia, a comedic animal tale that is fun for all ages.
GET ADVANCE TICKETS HERE

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3 Weird Pet Problems You’ve Probably Never Heard Of

As a pet owner, you do your best to protect your pet from typical known hazards, such as diseases, traffic, heat stroke, and the like…but there are some weird problems pets can come up with that you’ve probably never heard of. For example:

  1. Tick bite paralysis…While not very common, this very real condition occurs when a female tick releases a toxin into a dog while feeding. Signs of tick bite paralysis show up 6-9 days after a tick has attached itself to a dog. The toxin affects the nerves carrying signals between the spinal cord and muscles. [Cats are less frequently affected by this toxin.]
    It is important to find and remove all ticks on the affected dog — and to bring the pet to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for treatment, especially if the pet is having trouble breathing.
    What are the early warning signs of tick-bite paralysis? Read this article to get the full scoop.
  2. Water intoxication…According to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center, water intoxication, though rare, usually occurs during the warmer months when pets spend time at the beach or in a pool.
    Signs of water intoxication include nausea, vomiting, lethargy, difficulty breathing, and a swollen belly. In severe cases, the pet may be weak, unable to walk properly (stumbling), have seizures, have an abnormally slow heart rate, exhibit hypothermia (low body temperature), or even go into a coma.
    Pets that are suspected of having water intoxication should be taken to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for life-saving treatment.

    Which pets are most at risk for water intoxication? Read this article to find out.
  3. Toxic vomit…If your pet eats a rodent poison containing zinc phosphide, the chemical can mix with stomach acids and water to create dangerous phosphine gas. If your pet vomits, the gas is released into the air, which can lead to poisoning in people and pets. Phosphine gas can smell like garlic or rotting fish — or it may be odorless.
    If you suspect your pet has ingested rodent poison, call the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (1-888-426-4435) and take your pet to the nearest veterinary emergency hospital for treatment.
    Which poisons contain the ingredient zinc phosphide? Read this article to get the list.

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This article is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or suggest a treatment for any disease or disorder. This article is not a substitute for veterinary care or a client-doctor-patient relationship, nor does it constitute such a relationship. Your pet’s veterinarian is the best source of information regarding your pet’s health.

Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff is responsible for outcomes based on information available on this site.

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Today’s guest post is by Dr. Heather Brookshire, a veterinary ophthalmologist at Animal Vision Center of Virginia.
Tips & Tricks: Applying ointment

Administering pills or eye drops to your pet is one thing, but applying ointment over the surface of their eye? Yes, we know. It sounds impossible, but it can be done when you follow these tried and true instructions. Deep breath. Here we go:
  • Place your pet on a table or counter top, with a towel or blanket on the surface so they feel secure. 
  • Before applying the ointment, use a clean, warm washcloth to remove any mucus or discharge from the eye. 
  • Hold your pet gently, but firmly, in front of you with their back towards you. If your pet is wiggly, you may try wrapping them in a blanket to secure them. 
  • Using your non-dominant hand, gently compress the tube to allow a small amount of ointment to escape the tip (approximately ¼ inch in length). 
  • Using the same hand, manually open the eyelid and drape the released ointment on the surface of the eye, taking care not to make contact with the eye. 
  • Gently close the eyelid to assist with dispersion of the ointment on the surface of the eye. 
And remember – if both drops and ointments are part of your pet’s post-care plan, always apply the drop first, and then wait 5-10 minutes before applying the ointment. 

Reprinted with permission.This article is not intended to diagnose
or treat any medical condition and is not a substitute for
an examination by your pet’s veterinarian.

Your pet’s eyes are delicate organs. If you have a concern about your pet’s eyes, 
Contact Us
 to schedule an appointment with our veterinarian.

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