Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for May, 2018

Here’s a startling statistic: 11 million dogs and cats are diagnosed with cancer each year,

according to the Morris Animal Foundation (MAF). Since 1950, the Morris Animal Foundation has funded over 2,600 studies to improve the lives of dogs, cats, horses, and wildlife. In particular, MAF has been supporting cancer research since 1962, in pursuit of a cure and better quality of life for all animals.

Using research from Colorado State University Flint Animal Cancer Center, MAF has produced this list of 10 Warning Signs of Cancer in Dogs and Cats:

Cancer Warning Signs by Morris Animal Foundation. Click to enlarge.

It is important to remember that other diseases or physical ailments can cause symptoms similar to those listed above. Do not attempt to diagnose cancer on your own. Your pet’s veterinarian, or a specialty practice, can perform diagnostic tests to find out whether your pet’s symptoms are a result of cancer or something else.

In our next blog post, we will share an in-depth review of Morris Animal Foundation’s tips on how to help prevent cancer in pets. See below for a “sneak preview.”

Pet Cancer Prevention Checklist by Morris Animal Foundation. Click to enlarge.

Did you know you can donate to the Morris Animal Foundation? Your donation can help fund the next generation of life-saving research. Donate here.

 

Disclaimer: Information on this site is provided for educational purposes only, and is not meant to diagnose, treat, or cure your pet. Information provided on this site does not take the place of a valid client-patient-doctor relationship, nor does it constitute such a relationship. Your pet’s veterinarian is the best source of information regarding your pet’s health. Your pet may require an examination and testing by a licensed veterinarian in order to provide proper diagnosis and treatment. Neither Dr. Miele nor Little Creek Veterinary Clinic or its staff is responsible for outcomes based on information available on this site. Every pet’s condition is unique and requires the direct care and oversight of its own veterinarian.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

   As pet owners, the last thing we want to think about is the day we say “good-bye” to our beloved dog or cat. Especially as pets are living longer — sometimes as long as 15 to 20 years — they are more and more becoming a steadfast part of our lives: children grow up with their pets, and older pet owners rely on the familiar company of a dog or cat to keep them company as kids leave the nest.

   Inevitably, the time comes when a pet’s health declines beyond the point where medical intervention is helpful. When that happens, whether suddenly or over a period of time, the pet owner is faced with a heartbreaking decision: how and when to help the pet pass away through euthanasia.

   The “when” decision is typically made with the guidance of a veterinarian, who assists you in evaluating your pet’s quality of life and lets you know when further medical treatment will be futile.

   The “how” decision provides more room for choice, unless the decision to euthanize a pet (i.e., put it to sleep) is being made in an emergency setting.

   Historically, pet owners have relied on the family veterinarian to provide euthanasia services. Clients choose this method because they want to use the veterinarian they trust, in a familiar clinical setting. On the other hand, some pet owners will choose a veterinary clinic they have never been to before, and do not plan to return to after the euthanasia. The reason? They do not wish to return to a place with the unhappy memory of their pet’s last moments, and they also wish to separate those memories from their preferred veterinary clinic.

   A new option has arisen in recent years: in-home euthanasiaThis option works well for the following circumstances:

  • the pet is too large to move, and is incapable of walking on its own;
  • the pet owner wishes to be present for the pet’s final moments;
  • the pet owner would like complete privacy, which is difficult in a hospital;
  • the pet owner would like the pet to be in a comfortable, familiar setting, to ease the pet’s stress and fear;
  • the pet owner would like the option of having their other pets and family members present;
  • the pet owner needs to schedule the euthanasia outside of their veterinarian’s regular work hours;
  • the pet owner would like to determine how much time they can spend with their pet after the procedure.

   In-home euthanasia is a specialty practice offered by several Norfolk veterinarians (and elsewhere in Hampton Roads.) In addition to euthanasia and cremation services, some of these practitioners offer grief support.

Contact Us at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic for a list of the local specialty practices that offer in-home euthanasia, and learn whether this option is right for you and your pet.

 

Read Full Post »

What to do when you find a lost pet — Tips by HomeAgain

“You’ve been reading your Lost Pet Alerts, keeping a good lookout, and then, finally, you see a missing pet you know you can help! We don’t want to leave you hanging out there, PetRescuer, so we’ve compiled a list of tips and instructions for the best ways to approach a lost pet and what to do when you have a found pet in your care.

Approaching a Lost Pet

First things first, it’s really important to remember that lost pets are out of their element, and their behavior is often unpredictable. Be mindful of your approach:

  • Walk slowly toward the pet.
  • If the pet starts growling, back away.
  • Don’t make any sudden movements, like a quick grab for a collar, or you may provoke the pet into aggressive behavior.
  • If you can approach the pet without scaring it, try talking to it to give it a little reassurance.
  • Never put yourself at risk when trying to rescue a lost pet. Back away slowly and call animal control for help.

Sick and injured pets are almost always on the defensive, so in those situations, you should call animal control services for help. Even though you want to help, only trained professionals know how to handle these situations in a way that protects the pet and people involved.

What to Do With a Lost Pet

You’re standing toe-to-paw with a lost pet, now what? The first thing you need to do is check for a collar and ID tags and immediately call the number on the tags. Often, a pet will have an owner tag and a vet’s tag. Try to call the owner first, and if she doesn’t answer, try the vet.”

[Did You Know? If you find a dog or cat, Little Creek Veterinary Clinic will scan it for a microchip — FOR FREE — to help you get the pet back home.]

“As you may know, many lost pets don’t have collars. Cats generally don’t wear collars and tags, and lost dogs also have a tendency to lose their collars, too. So it’s pretty common to come across a lost pet without a collar and ID tags.

You have a few options for what to do with a lost pet with no form of visible ID:

  • Take it to a vet clinic or animal shelter to be scanned for a microchip.
    • If you take the pet to a vet clinic, please be aware that they may not shelter the pet until the owner is located–except maybe in the strange circumstance that it’s one of their patients.
  • Call a local shelter with animal control services to come and pick up the pet.
    • Not all shelters have animal control services, so you may have to call more than one.

If a microchip scan positively identifies the pet, then you have to decide whether to keep the pet in your care until the owner arrives or leave it with a shelter. This, of course, is a decision only you can make, and it depends entirely on your circumstances. All PetRescuers need to remember to keep any lost pets separated from their children and other pets. This helps ensure that everyone is safe, so that your good deed doesn’t end badly.

Thanks for all your help and remember to play it safe around lost pets. Happy rescuing!”

***********************

Learn more about why Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends HomeAgain microchips for his patients, then Contact Us to schedule your pet for a quick and easy HomeAgain microchip ID implant.

  1. https://littlecreekvet.com/2014/09/23/getting-your-lost-pet-back-is-just-the-tip-of-the-iceberg-heres-why/
  2. https://littlecreekvet.com/2014/09/18/microchips-are-a-safe-effective-permanent-id-heres-why/
  3. https://littlecreekvet.com/2016/09/13/lost-pet-microchip-recovery/

 

Read Full Post »

Does your cat have itchy ears? The Number One cause of itchy ears in cats is ear mites, according to Dr. Lynette Cole of Ohio State University.

At a recent lecture attended by Norfolk veterinarians and their staff, Dr. Cole listed the top three most common causes of itchy, inflamed ears in cats: parasites, polyps, and allergies.

Ear mites, which are a type of parasite, appear to be tiny white specks that move around, when seen through a magnifier such as an otoscope

Veterinary otoscope, used to examine ears.

 

Looking through an otoscope at a model cat ear.

Seen under a microscope, however, the situation becomes much more clear. Ear mites, known also as Otodectes cynotis, have eight legs and are very active crawlers. And if that weren’t enough Ick Factor — ear mites are arachnids, putting them in the same class as spiders and ticks.

Ear mite removed from a kitten. Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Ear mite removed from a kitten. (2) Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

What’s the first sign of ear mites? Since you can’t see the mites with your naked eye, the first visible sign of a problem may be a layer of crusty, black debris in your pet’s ear. Sometimes it looks like coffee grounds. By the time this debris appears, your cat is probably scratching her ears, which may be what prompts you to look inside the ears.

Since there may be other causes of “crud” in the ears, you’ll want your cat’s veterinarian to examine the ears to find out if ear mites are present. Then, the veterinarian will devise an appropriate treatment plan.

Ear mites can be transmitted from one pet to another, so the veterinarian may advise treating all pets in the household at the same time.

Check out these videos we’ve uploaded to our You Tube channel, featuring the ear mites shown in the photos above. One mite is mired in mineral oil, while the other mite speeds out of view!

Does your cat have itchy ears or suspicious-looking debris inside? Contact Us to schedule an appointment today!

[Our doctor cannot diagnose your pet over the phone or the Internet, so please schedule an appointment today.]

Bonus: Our cat patients that are treated with Revolution to protect against fleas, heartworms, and intestinal worms are also receiving protection from ear mites!

Revolution Rewards details here.

Read Full Post »

As a reminder, Little Creek Veterinary Clinic is closed on Wednesday each week.

If your pet needs immediate medical attention while Dr. Miele is out of the office, please contact BluePearl Emergency Hospital at 757-499-5463.

BluePearl keeps us informed about your pet’s emergency medical care, and helps us keep your pet’s medical records complete.

For non-emergency situations, please Contact Us via internet, email [littlecreekvet@live.com], or phone [757-583-2619 — leave a message.] For those leaving a voice mail message, please be aware that we do not have Caller ID, so it is essential that you slowly and clearly say your preferred contact phone number.

Thank you — and keep in touch!

Read Full Post »