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Archive for June, 2017

Ceva has introduced an affordable topical flea control for dogs and cats, called Combiva II.

Combiva II is available at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic for cats 8 weeks and older, weighing at least 5 pounds, and for dogs 7 weeks and older, weighing 3 – 55 pounds.

Affordable effective topical flea control

Combiva II for cats

Affordable effective topical flea control for dogs

Combiva II for dogs

Combiva II has the same active ingredients (imidacloprid / pyriproxyfen) as Advantage II.*

Why does Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommend Combiva II?

Because Combiva II:

  • Effectively kills adult fleas and prevents further re-infestation
  • Kills re-infesting fleas within 2 hours
  • Breaks the flea life cycle and prevents flea eggs and larvae from developing into adult fleas
  • Provides effective once a month flea protection
  • Is waterproof after application
  • Is an affordable option for topical flea control

Questions? Contact Us!

*Combiva II is not manufactured by Bayer. Advantage is a registered trademark of Bayer.

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You probably already know that topical flea control works best when applied directly to your pet’s skin — not on top of the fur.

But did you know that there’s an important step you can take to help the flea control product spread properly, every time? 

It’s brushing! Brushing or combing your pet will remove old, loose fur and clear the path for the topical flea control product to spread over your pet’s body at the skin level, as intended.
(Bonus: removing old, loose fur also keeps skin healthy and prevents fur matting.)

Even pets that appear to have a short, smooth coat can have a sneaky layer of last season’s fur hiding underneath. For this post, I used a metal flea comb and a wire brush to remove old fur from Curly’s coat.

Why grooming your cat before applying flea control products is important

Curly, showing off his handsome coat, after grooming. Flea control application will be much easier now.

 

Removing old loose fur from your pet's coat makes it easier to properly apply flea control products.

Curly’s fur, removed by combing and brushing. (Shaving not required!)

 

Topical flea control spreads at the skin level more easily after old loose fur has been removed.

Removing the thick loose fur makes it easier to apply flea control directly to the skin.

 

This cat has fun playing with the old loose fur that's been taken out of his coat to allow flea control products to be applied directly to his skin.

Curly enjoyed being reunited with his old coat.

Enjoy this video of Curly playing with his fur!

Bonus tip: keep your pet active for at least 30 minutes after applying topical flea control, which helps the product spread faster and more evenly over your pet’s body.

 

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When you can’t take your pet with you, take along a reminder of how much you love your furbabies.

Here are a few pet-inspired accessories that will keep Fido and Fluffy on your mind.

From Charming Charlie:

Happy Kitty Silicone Watch

From Nordstrom Rack:

Betsey Johnson Women’s Princess Cat Crystal Watch

From The Animal Rescue Site:

Pawsitively Beautiful Tote Bag

From The American Kennel Club:

Dog Breed Phone Cases

From Mod Cloth:

Very Well Rained Wallet


From Bradford Exchange:

“Playful Pups” Choose Your Dog Breed Sneakers

From Charlotte Olympia:

Kitty Flats

From Belk:

Hot Sox New Classic Dogs Trouser Socks

BuzzFeed Selections – More quirky pet-themed clothes and accessories

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Baked bean? Nope – it’s an engorged, dead tick, thoughtfully preserved for the enlightenment of future generations of pet owners. Photo by Little Creek Veterinary Clinic.

Can we all agree that ticks are disgusting? Yes? Good!

Now, let’s talk about how to remove ticks from your pet. There are right ways and wrong ways to remove ticks. You’re going to want to do it the right way.

Do This to Remove Ticks:

  • Check for and remove ticks as soon as possible, to help prevent the transmission of disease.
  • Wear gloves, to avoid transmission of disease from the tick.
  • Use tweezers or a tick removal device to do the job.
  • Grasp the tick firmly, as close to the pet’s skin as possible, and pull back slowly and steadily.
  • Clean the area with soap and water after the tick has been removed.
  • Place the tick (or ticks) in a small container and bring it to your pet’s doctor for examination. Different ticks carry different diseases, so tick identification is an important part of treatment.

…But Don’t Do That:

  • Don’t try burning or heating up the tick. You are more likely to injure your pet this way.
  • Don’t try to “smother” the tick with petroleum jelly or fingernail polish. It’s a time-waster, and time is critical in preventing the transmission of tick-borne diseases.
  • Don’t crush or yank the tick, and don’t twist it. Doing so could increase your pet’s risk of exposure to disease.
  • Don’t fret about not removing the mouthparts. Some ticks have very long mouthparts that are cemented in place for the feeding. It’s not worth the hassle of going in after them, according to Dr. Glen Needham, an expert on ticks who recently spoke on the subject with Norfolk veterinarians.

In the Future:

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WELCOME:

  • Abigail
  • Miko
  • Finn
  • Taz
  • Lola
  • Lizzie Mae
  • Linus
  • Mia
  • Black & White Kitty
  • Axl

WE REMEMBER:

  • Skitchell
  • Zoe
  • Ruby
  • Mary

 

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