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Archive for January, 2017

A Warm Welcome:

  • Twinkie
  • Kona
  • Luna
  • Maggie May
  • Snickerdoodle
  • Gracie-Mae
  • Archer
  • Balto
  • Buddy
  • Shy
  • Windy
  • Sunny
  • Storm
  • Nadine

A Fond Farewell:

  • Molly
  • Baby Kitty
  • Sunshine
  • Missy
  • Chester
  • Wally

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On Tuesday, we learned about the combination of vaccines that make up the canine DHPP booster, commonly referred to as “the distemper shot.” Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends that all dogs living in the Hampton Roads region receive their distemper-combo booster, along with the Rabies vaccine. The distemper-combo booster protects dogs against the most common, and deadly, canine diseases.

Cats also receive a cocktail of vaccinations, typically rolled into one shot. Since many cats are allowed to roam outdoors unsupervised, it is especially important to keep cats vaccinated against Rabies and other diseases. This is a closer look at the components of the FVRCCP vaccine, sometimes known as the “feline distemper shot.”

FVR is for Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, aka Feline Herpesvirus-1, a severe upper respiratory disease that, once contracted, often remains in the cat’s body. Recurrent outbreaks throughout the cat’s life are common. Signs include fever, congestion, runny eyes and nose, sores and crusts on the face, lip ulcers, mouth breathing, coughing, sneezing, and drooling. Vaccination helps reduce the severity of signs.

C is for Calicivirus, an upper respiratory disease that can cause fever, blisters on the tongue, and may turn into pneumonia.

C is for Chlamydiosis, a bacterial respiratory infection that is highly contagious. Signs include conjunctivitis, sneezing, runny eyes, excessive drooling, and coughing.

P is for Feline Panleukopenia, aka Feline Distemper, a contagious virus that causes fever, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, depression, dehydration, and can lead to death.

Is your cat due or past due to receive its booster vaccinations? Contact Us to schedule an appointment with our veterinarian today!

Note: Other vaccines are available to cats, including Rabies and Feline Leukemia. However, those vaccines are given in a separate injection and, for our purposes, are not considered part of the distemper combinations.

Lg Caduceus

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If you’ve ever wondered what all those funky initials stand for in your dog’s annual “distemper shot,” we’ve got the answer for you.

You may see any of the following combinations:

  • DA2PP
  • DHPP
  • DHLPP
  • DHPPC

All of those abbreviations are variants of the distemper-combination vaccine, which may include extra vaccines given according to a pet’s lifestyle.

So what do those letters actually stand for?

D is for Distemper, a highly contagious virus that can cause death in dogs. Distemper affects the respiratory and nervous systems. Signs include coughing, fever, lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and seizures.

A2 is for Adenovirus type 2 /
H is for Adenovirus type 1 (aka Hepatitis)
. Adenovirus 2 and Adenovirus 1 are so closely related that a vaccine against one will work against both diseases. Adenovirus 2 is a respiratory illness that causes coughing, retching, and conjunctivitis. Hepatitis affects the liver and leads to fever, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. In some cases, Hepatitis will damage the kidneys, also.
 

P is for Parainfluenza, a very contagious respiratory disease. Signs include a dry, hacking cough.

P is for Parvovirus, a deadly virus that spreads quickly among dogs. Signs include vomiting, bloody diarrhea, loss of appetite, and lethargy. In some puppies, Parvovirus attacks the heart.

C is for Coronavirus, a severe intestinal disease that often mimics the signs of Parvo and can occur in puppies vaccinated against Parvovirus. Corona also can appear in conjunction with Parvo, worsening the disease symptoms. Signs include vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, weight loss, lethargy, and excessive thirst.

L is for Leptospirosis, a bacterial infection spread by wild animals. Dogs often acquire the disease by drinking contaminated water outdoors. Signs include high fever, jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes), bloody stools, exhaustion, and hemorrhage. If your pet becomes infected with Leptospirosis, you can get sick from it, too.

Dr. Donald Miele, a Norfolk veterinarian, recommends that all dogs living in the Hampton Roads region receive their distemper-combo booster, along with the Rabies vaccine. The distemper-combo booster protects dogs against the most common, and deadly, canine diseases.

Is your dog due or past due to receive its booster vaccinations? Contact Us to schedule an appointment with our veterinarian today!

Note: Other vaccines are available to dogs, including Rabies, Bordetella, Canine Influenza, and Lyme Disease. However, those vaccines are given in a separate injection and, for our purposes, are not considered part of the distemper combinations.

Coming up next: Alphabet Soup, Part 2: What’s in your cat’s FVRCP vaccine?

Lg Caduceus

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Don’t let your love of baseball be dampened by a disability. Kids [4 and over] and adults with any type of disability are welcome to join the Ocean View Little League Challenger Dodgers & Mets.

[Learn about the Little League Challenger Division here.]

Sign-up cost is $15 per player. Register today! Contact information for Coach Gary Owens is listed on the flyer below:

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Play ball!

Did You Know?
What’s the connection between Little Creek Veterinary Clinic and Little League Baseball? Our veterinarian spent his youth in Williamsport, PA, home of the Little League World Series!

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Little Creek Veterinary Clinic has survived the first local blizzard of 2017, which dumped over 11 inches of powdery snow into our parking lot.

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Snow at the bottom of our porch steps was piled nearly a foot deep.

(It’s not just hurricanes and tropical storms —
other weather events get names, too.
Learn about winter storm names here.)

We dug out from under much of the snow, and let the sun do the rest of the work of clearing our lot. Meanwhile, Dr. Miele was snowbound at home, so the clinic remained closed until today.

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We are back up and running and more warm days are ahead, so if your pet is due for its annual vaccination boosters, this is the perfect time to Contact Us about scheduling an appointment.

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It’s time for the Norfolk Admirals’
annual Pucks and Paws event.

Game night is Friday, January 20th, at 7:30 PM.

Tickets are available only until
January 18th, 11:59 PM.

Proceeds from your dog’s ticket benefits local animal shelters.

Don’t delay – claim a spot for you and your pup today!

pucks-and-paws

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Today’s guest post is by Dr. Heather Brookshire, a veterinary ophthalmolgist at the Animal Vision Center of Virginia.
FOCUS on Ocular Health
By Dr. Heather Brookshire
Many severe ocular conditions can be prevented or avoided by identifying them early and becoming familiar with the conditions for which your pet may be predisposed. For instance, many brachycephalic breeds (dogs with short noses) are predisposed to the development of corneal ulcers due to increased exposure of their eyes, among other factors. 
                 
Many purebred dogs (especially Poodles, Labradors, Golden retrievers, Boston terriers, miniature Schnauzers, Cocker spaniels, etc.) are predisposed to heritable cataract formation. While we currently cannot prevent cataracts from forming, when caught early, surgery can be performed with a high success rate to remove the cataract and restore vision. 
Glaucoma (increased eye pressure) is another common heritable/genetic condition that can be successfully treated with early detection. When undiagnosed and untreated, this condition can cause a chronic headache sensation for your pet and irreversible blindness. Breeds predisposed to glaucoma include the Basset hound, Cocker spaniel, Boston terrier, Flat-coated retriever, Golden retriever, Chow Chow, Shiba Inu, Shar pei, Poodle, Siberian husky and many more. 

For more information on your pet’s specific breed, an excellent resource is the Inherited Diseases in Dogs Database. The directory, compiled at Cambridge Veterinary School, is great not only for heritable eye diseases, but all diseases suspected to have a genetic basis. If you feel that your pet may be at risk for eye disease, it is always a good idea to have the eyes evaluated by your family veterinarian or a veterinary ophthalmologist to catch the problem early and help prevent blindness.

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Reprinted with permission.This article is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical condition and is not a substitute for an examination by your pet’s veterinarian.

Your pet’s eyes are delicate organs. If you have a concern about your pet’s eyes, Contact Us to schedule an appointment with our veterinarian.

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