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Archive for July, 2016

Cat found near Lynnhaven Mall in Virginia Beach

Cat found near Lynnhaven Mall in Virginia Beach

Hu found cat 2

This healthy, friendly male cat was hanging out at a business near Lynnhaven Mall and jumped into a vehicle in the wee hours of this morning. The “finder” is looking for the cat’s family, as he is surely missed.

If you recognize this cat, please call Little Creek Veterinary Clinic at 757-583-2619

Note: This cat is not at Little Creek Veterinary Clinic at this time.

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From Little Creek Veterinary Clinic‘s inbox to yours:
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WE’RE GOING TO THE DOGS THIS 
SUNDAY, JULY 31ST! 
Enjoy the Norfolk Botanical Garden with FIDO
and help support our friends at the Norfolk SPCA. 

Fido is just $5  
(Regular Garden admission applies to humans) 
 It’s hot! – remember to bring water for you and your pet.
Don’t be surprised if you see some hunky good-looking men with dogs in the Garden. They’re getting their photo taken for the Norfolk SPCA fundraising calendar  –MAGIC MUTT.
Not Yet a Member? Learn more here.

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This sweet dog was found this afternoon near

Newport Avenue and W. Little Creek Road in Norfolk.

If you recognize her, please help

reunite her with her family.

Call 757-995-3315.

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This month in Norfolk, VA has been hot — now check out these cool events* on tap all over town. We can’t guarantee that pets are allowed at all events (although the Hermitage Museum welcomes well-behaved pets), but you deserve a night out, so hire a pet-sitter and go party!

*Admission fees may apply. Check the links below for information.

Fantail Film Festival (Battleship Wisconsin) – July 23rd, August 6th,
August 20th

Fantail

Showing July 23rd!

 

National Night Out – August 2nd

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

 

Hermitage Museum Sunsets on the River – August 4th
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Zoo Grooves – August 27th
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With daily high temperatures in the 80s and 90s,
it’s time for a reminder on how to prevent deadly heat stroke in pets.

Let your dog chill out this summer!

Let your dog chill out this summer!

For long-time readers of this blog, this post on heat stroke looks familiar. Why? Because I’ve been posting it nearly every year since 2010. Every year, pets suffer heat stroke, but it doesn’t have to be that way. So I’ll keep repeating this column until heat stroke in pets is a thing of the past.

And now, without further ado:

Heat Stroke in Pets

Do you know how to protect your pets from heat stroke during the muggy days of summer?  This goes beyond the usual caveat of “never leave your pet in a car while you go shopping, babysit, attend a sporting event, spy on your ex-boyfriend, etc.  Here are some tips to keep your pet safe in the yard or out and about:

  • Keep pets indoors as much as possible, especially if they are sluggish or panting soon after going outdoors.
  • Limit exercise to brief walks in the coolest parts of the day.  Keep in mind that hot pavement and sand can burn pets’ paws.
  • Provide plenty of cool water.  Check water throughout the day, as it can become hot if left outdoors. 
  • Kennels and pens should have good ventilation and air circulation and should be kept in shaded areas.

Here’s a super-cool idea: Check your dog into Happy Tails Resort
in Norfolk and let her enjoy the indoor swimming pool and play area!

Warning Signs of Heat Stroke or Heat Stress

Your pet may need emergency assistance if it exhibits any of the following signs:

  • Excessive panting and drooling
  • Bright red gums
  • Balance problems
  • Lethargy
  • Staring or anxious expression
  • Labored breathing
  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Failure to respond to commands
  • High fever
  • Collapse

What To Do

Lower your pet’s body temperature by easing him into a cool (not freezing) bath.  Water from the outdoor hose may be hot, so that may not be your best option.  

Bring your pet indoors and place him in a tub, taking care to keep his mouth and nose above water [we use stacks of towels to accomplish this.] 

Apply ice packs to his head and neck. 

Call your veterinarian for further instructions.  In most cases, your pet will be hospitalized for treatment and observation.  By necessity, this sort of care may take place at the 24-hour emergency hospital.

Who Is At Risk of Heat Stroke?

Any pet can have heat stroke, but some are more susceptible than others. All pets need to be protected on hot days.  However, these pets are more likely than others to have a problem:

  • Very young and older pets
  • Short-nosed/pug-nosed breeds
  • Overweight pets
  • Pets with cardiovascular or respiratory disorders
  • Pets with a previous history of heat stress

Heat stroke is a life-threatening emergency.  If you suspect your pet has heat stroke, we recommend taking him to the nearest emergency hospital for comprehensive care.

[Information borrowed from “Summer Pet Tips” by Ralston Purina Company and “Summer Safety Tips” by Firstline magazine.]

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This article was originally published on July 28, 2010.

Photo credit: By Leif Skoogfors (This image is from the FEMA Photo Library.) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

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national_pet_fire_safety_day

I’ll admit, when I began researching information about National Pet Fire Safety Day, I had a particular idea in mind: finding information that helps pet owners keep their pets safe from fire. What I found was different than I expected.

This article by the American Kennel Club and ADT Security Service suggests the purpose of National Pet Fire Safety Day is to raise awareness of how to prevent pets from starting fires.

Yep. You read that correctly. National Pet Fire Safety Day can be all about preventing fires started by pets.

So how might a pet start a fire? We’ve got a few ideas:

  • Cats love to knock things off tables, desks, counters, and other surfaces. Imagine a cat knocking a burning candle or cigarette onto a rug.
  • Dogs occasionally jump up on stoves to get food. A number dogs have knocked stove knobs into the “on” position beneath pots and pans, which have caught fire.
  • Some pets chew on electrical cords, which can create a fire hazard.
  • A pet can grab the cord of a clothes iron or curling iron and pull it down, igniting material on the floor — or the floor itself.

Do these hazards exist in your home? You may need to pet-fireproof your household.

  • Do not leave burning candles unattended, and keep pets out of rooms where there is an open flame. Consider switching to flameless candles.
  • Some stoves have removable knobs to prevent children and pets from accidentally turning on the stove or oven.
  • Put cord covers over exposed wires and cables, or crate your pet so it cannot chew cords while you’re away.
  • Keep pets out of rooms where heated appliances are used.

National Pet Fire Safety Day is also about protecting your pets from fires in the home:

  • Check smoke detectors in the home at least every 6 months to be sure they are working. Change the batteries at those times, also.
  • Affix an “Animals Inside” cling to windows or doors to alert first responders that pets inside will need rescuing.
  • Keep pets carriers and leashes near the door, for a quick evacuation.
  • Keep identification on your pets in case they escape or are brought to a shelter following a house fire. Consider a HomeAgain microchip — a permanent form of pet identification.

By following these tips on National Pet Fire Safety Day and every day, you and your pets can be safer at home.

Bonus: Order your free “Animals Inside” window cling from the ASPCA —  just click here!

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After the go-round with our phones last week,
I’ve decided I need a Moment of Zen.

Here it is:

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(Photo of sunset at Denbigh Park by Jennifer Miele)

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